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Is Shutter Speeds  
User currently offlineLHSebi From Germany, joined Jan 2004, 1049 posts, RR: 8
Posted (10 years 2 months 1 week 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 2486 times:

Hello,
I just got the 75-300 IS lens for my birthday today, and I am very excited to get shooting with it. Before I go out for my first serious shoot at the airport, I want some help. Exactly how much slower can I go with IS on, and not get blurred shots. I know it all depends on the person shooting, but picture me, as an amateur photographer, with a semi-steady hand Big grin. Any help will do. Also, is it not wise to turn on the IS at night? Thanks!

Sebastian


I guess that's what happens in the end, you start thinking about the beginning.
10 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineRotor1 From Tajikistan, joined Mar 2003, 230 posts, RR: 3
Reply 1, posted (10 years 2 months 1 week 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 2454 times:

As a general rule, they say you should never use lower than the inverse of the focal length you're using as a shutter speed, IE 300mm stay above 1/300th. As a general rule with IS systems (aside from the 70-200 and such advanced ones) I cut that in half and call that the safe low. You should be able to do a 1/30th sec shot at 75mm without worry, and a 300mm shot at 1/160th or 1/125th without worry. Panning helps mess this up, especially with an IS system that doesn't know if you are panning or what (earlier generation Canon IS systems, like yours and that on my Olympus).

I've been able to push even further down, with less reliability. If you hold steady and/or have good panning skills (when applicable), and a good shutter pull, you can go way, way low. Take extra shots, just in case.

Best I've done and still gotten razor sharpness was 1/2 second at 200mm. Took about 100 pics and maybe 2 came out.

Have fun, experiment, and don't trust the LCD screen (if you have a digi). Take lots of pictures and only delete the painfully obvious mess-ups (chopped the plane in half, so blurry you can't tell what type of aircraft it is, etc)

-Mike



The best aviation photo I've ever taken was rejected by Airliners.net
User currently offlineLHSebi From Germany, joined Jan 2004, 1049 posts, RR: 8
Reply 2, posted (10 years 2 months 1 week 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 2446 times:

Mike,
Thanks a lot for your answer. That helps a lot. I will keep that rule of thumb in mind. Forgot to mention: I use the 300D. Any others?

Sebastian



I guess that's what happens in the end, you start thinking about the beginning.
User currently offline2912n From United States of America, joined Oct 2001, 2013 posts, RR: 8
Reply 3, posted (10 years 2 months 1 week 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 2444 times:

Like everything else, get out and practice with it. When I got my IS lens I put the camera on HQ jpeg and just shot everything that moved in many different light conditions at various settings to see what I could do with it.

I have used my 70-200 indoors in gym lighting at 1/30th with nice results. But lots of trash as well.


User currently offlineCkw From UK - England, joined Aug 2010, 730 posts, RR: 16
Reply 4, posted (10 years 2 months 1 week 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 2393 times:

Practice is the only answer - it depends on so many factors (wind, cold, when you had your last cup of coffee). You need to find your own "safe zone". After much practice I have for each lens a minimum shutter speed which I can rely on in pretty much any situation, a slower one which I'll use in ideal conditions and an emergency minimum where I would expect to get perhaps 1 in 3 sharp.

Of course you can get lucky, and I've got away with shots as slow as 1/15th using 600mm ... but I would never count on that!

Cheers,

Colin



Colin K. Work, Pixstel
User currently offlineKaddyuk From Wallis and Futuna, joined Nov 2001, 4126 posts, RR: 26
Reply 5, posted (10 years 2 months 1 week 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 2376 times:

600mm @ 1/15th Feck me thats a steady hand haha  Smile

Thanx for the Rule Of Thumb Rotor.



Whoever said "laughter is the best medicine" never had Gonorrhea
User currently offlineCkw From UK - England, joined Aug 2010, 730 posts, RR: 16
Reply 6, posted (10 years 2 months 1 week 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 2370 times:

600mm @ 1/15th Feck me thats a steady hand haha

As I say, I wouldn't rely on it  Smile But more realistically, I was shooting a dinner-dance last Saturday with lots of available light candid shots - using the 70-200mm (mostly at 200mm) I was shooting between 1/15th and 1/30th and got around 60% success rate ... and most that didn't work were due to people moving, not the camera.

But there are plenty who will tell you that IS is a gimmick  Smile

Cheers,

Colin




Colin K. Work, Pixstel
User currently offlinePH-OTO From Netherlands, joined Mar 2002, 434 posts, RR: 31
Reply 7, posted (10 years 2 months 1 week 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 2367 times:

This one was shot at 350mm with 1/90th

View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Martin Boschhuizen - AirTeamImages



This one also 1/90th but around 100mm and the plane doing 150 mph
http://www.airliners.net/procphotos/rejphoto.main?filename=A08004_N415MC.jpg

OK, it was rejected, but I think this is a pretty impressive performance


Martin




Look very closely between the lines of this message, and you will see the captain beating up the jumpseater
User currently offlineMygind66 From Spain, joined May 2004, 1058 posts, RR: 12
Reply 8, posted (10 years 2 months 1 week 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 2307 times:

One thing not commented is if you are using a tripod it is recommended to use the IS. This is what Canon says in the user manual. What I don't know is because is not working while in the tripod or is dangerous and can be broken. What do you think about?

Kike


User currently offlineJeffM From United States of America, joined May 2005, 3266 posts, RR: 52
Reply 9, posted (10 years 2 months 1 week 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 2304 times:

IS only works when there is camera movement. When properly mounted on a tripod, you null the effects of both rate gyros. Rate gyros only output error correction when movement is detected on the sensitive axis. No movement, zero output, zero correction to the lens. The only thing you are doing is wasting battery life. I've tried it on a tripod with no ill effects. A gyro spins just as nice stationary as it does hand held.

User currently offlineMygind66 From Spain, joined May 2004, 1058 posts, RR: 12
Reply 10, posted (10 years 2 months 1 week 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 2296 times:

Thanks for the explanation Jeff.
Time to go to bed (1,00h am here in Mallorca, Spain).  Sleepy
Kike


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