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High Noon Photographs...  
User currently offlineMaiznblu_757 From United States of America, joined Mar 2002, 5112 posts, RR: 50
Posted (10 years 5 months 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 2471 times:

Does anyone have any luck getting good photos with the sun high in the sky? Everytime I shoot during this condition, my photos have a strange color to them. Obviously, its best to shoot with the sun directly to your back, but, I am curious to here your thoughts.

[Edited 2004-05-25 05:55:43]

18 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineJe89_w From United States of America, joined Mar 2002, 2362 posts, RR: 9
Reply 1, posted (10 years 5 months 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 2433 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
PHOTO SCREENER

Yeah, I also tend to get a strange color balance to my photos, which can be quite tricky to correct. Also with that type of "pancake light", the contrast level is a bit skewed (I tend to get a lot of dark shadows under the plane).

User currently offlineN317AS From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (10 years 5 months 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 2431 times:

We never see sun in Seattle Big grin, so I guess I'll be no help.

User currently offlineBronko From United States of America, joined Jul 2001, 810 posts, RR: 11
Reply 3, posted (10 years 5 months 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 2398 times:

Turn the contrast down in camera, and set the exposure compensation down -1. Also use a lens hood and shoot RAW for further tweakage ability.

Works great for me, even on unpainted Boeing's.



Jet City Aviation Photography
User currently offlineFireguy274 From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 299 posts, RR: 7
Reply 4, posted (10 years 5 months 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 2258 times:

I use the lens hood, shoot in raw and I set the metering to spot metering....Artie

User currently offlineMikephotos From United States of America, joined Oct 2000, 2923 posts, RR: 54
Reply 5, posted (10 years 5 months 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 2239 times:

Unless it's a rare aircraft that you'll probably never see again, best advice for high-noon shooting is....not shooting. For common items why bother? Lower parts of the fuselage are dark, tops are blown. Sure you can get shots accepted here with DSLRS and high-noon shooting but they are just horrible to look at.

Michael


User currently offlineCodeshare From Poland, joined Sep 2002, 1854 posts, RR: 1
Reply 6, posted (10 years 5 months 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 2242 times:

Fireguy274 - spot metering, I think that is the trick. I used 3D-Matrix (I use a Nikon F80) and the fuselages came out overexposed and indeed I had rejections for badcolor.




How much A is there is Airliners Net ? 0 or nothing ?
User currently offlineMaiznblu_757 From United States of America, joined Mar 2002, 5112 posts, RR: 50
Reply 7, posted (10 years 5 months 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 2193 times:

Thanks Bronko,
Ill try that.


User currently offlineFireguy274 From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 299 posts, RR: 7
Reply 8, posted (10 years 5 months 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 2182 times:

Mikephotos why dont you pick out which of my pics were taken at high noon Mike....I think youd be surprised...Artie

User currently offlineMikephotos From United States of America, joined Oct 2000, 2923 posts, RR: 54
Reply 9, posted (10 years 5 months 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 2168 times:


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Artie Caissie



Here's one that's either high-noon or slight back-lit. Either way, I would avoid shooting in those conditions/times. Yes, the photo is sharp, composed nicely, and acceptable but it just does nothing for me lighting wise. Please don't take that the wrong way, I was not pointing fingers at anyone in particular or accusing you directly.

Mike


User currently offlineTS From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 10, posted (10 years 5 months 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 2167 times:

I don't even bother to shoot around noon. I really don't like the light. Still, there are some weeks in December & January when you can shoot all day in nice light.

Thomas


User currently offlineMikephotos From United States of America, joined Oct 2000, 2923 posts, RR: 54
Reply 11, posted (10 years 5 months 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 2161 times:

Thomas,

Here in NY high-sun is only a factor during late spring & summer. Fall and Winter high-sun is not a factor and you can shoot from 8am til it starts turning yellow (3pm or so). During the mid-summer, I will only shoot early morning until 930am-10am and then 4pm on.

Mike


User currently offlineFireguy274 From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 299 posts, RR: 7
Reply 12, posted (10 years 5 months 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 2152 times:

I see your point Mike. In Boston where they land on several different runways depending on the wind perfect conditions are not all the frequent, Not to mention most of the internationals come in between noon and three. I love late afternoon light myself but 9 times out of ten they seem to be using the wrong runway....Artie Good eye by the way photo was taken at 12:14:06...lol

[Edited 2004-05-25 21:28:11]

User currently offlineMikephotos From United States of America, joined Oct 2000, 2923 posts, RR: 54
Reply 13, posted (10 years 5 months 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 2143 times:

Hey Artie, no one said this stuff was easy  Smile I know what you mean. It seems when you're going out to shoot they never use the runways you want or prefer for the certain time of day.

Mike


User currently offlineAKE0404AR From United States of America, joined May 2000, 2535 posts, RR: 46
Reply 14, posted (10 years 5 months 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 2125 times:

Artie,

You can set your watch....Swiss is always on time!

Vasco


User currently offlineFireguy274 From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 299 posts, RR: 7
Reply 15, posted (10 years 5 months 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 2107 times:

Yes they are Vasco..lol

User currently offlineMaiznblu_757 From United States of America, joined Mar 2002, 5112 posts, RR: 50
Reply 16, posted (10 years 5 months 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 2084 times:

Would Auto White Balance have an effect on the way the photos turn out when the sun is high?


What is the easiest way to set your Auto White Balance? Is it as simple as taking a photo and setting it based on that photo or should I take a full frame photo of a white piece of paper before I begin shooting?


User currently offline2912n From United States of America, joined Oct 2001, 2013 posts, RR: 8
Reply 17, posted (10 years 5 months 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 2060 times:

Auto white is just that...auto.

You can do cutom WB by shooting a white card and using that data. I believe you are better off using either auto or daylight settings.


User currently offlineMaiznblu_757 From United States of America, joined Mar 2002, 5112 posts, RR: 50
Reply 18, posted (10 years 5 months 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 2048 times:

Thanks, I guess that didnt make much sense.

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