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Over-exposed Image Problem  
User currently offlineLHSebi From Germany, joined Jan 2004, 1049 posts, RR: 8
Posted (10 years 2 months 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 2196 times:

Hello again!
I was hoping some of the more experienced photographers here can give me a hand, or anyone that has tips for that matter!  Big thumbs up Anyways, whenever I go to take photos at my home airport of DUS, most/all photos turn out over-exposed. The LH livery being white doesn't help for that matter! I just got 9 pics rejected, mainly because there were very bright spots on the planes. I have a 300D...any help please! Is it possible to change something, so that the camera underexposes, and I can fix that in photoshop afterwards? Thanks in advance to all that care  Big grin

Sebastian

BTW: here are some of those pics:

http://airliners.net/procphotos/rejphoto.main?filename=DABEK_july8_dus_overrunwaystrobe.jpg

http://airliners.net/procphotos/rejphoto.main?filename=DAGEE_july8_dus_overrunway.jpg

http://airliners.net/procphotos/rejphoto.main?filename=DAIQE_july8_dus_siderearsmoke.jpg



I guess that's what happens in the end, you start thinking about the beginning.
17 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineMikec From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2004, 247 posts, RR: 13
Reply 1, posted (10 years 2 months 5 days 19 hours ago) and read 2178 times:

You need to change the exposure compensation (EV) on the camera - hold the button on the back that has a square split in two with a dark and light half and then move the control wheel backwards - you'll see the exposure display on the screen move to the left (under exposing), 1/3 of a stop at a time. On sunny days with white liveries, like LH, try either 1/3 or 2/3 under exposure and see how it comes out. Remember it's much easier to fix a slightly underexposed image afterwards - if you overexpose, the detail is lost forever and can't be put back in photoshop.

Michael.

Edit: I didn't look at the rejected photos before but after looking at them, it seems the sun wasn't behind you, so you end up with a bright background, and a duller subject as the sun wasn't lighting the side you were photographing. It would help you a lot if you could shoot in a place/time of day where the sun was behind you lighting the aircraft.

[Edited 2004-07-18 21:34:09]

User currently offlineIL76 From Netherlands, joined Jan 2004, 2237 posts, RR: 48
Reply 2, posted (10 years 2 months 5 days 19 hours ago) and read 2174 times:

Sebastian,
These 3 shots are all back-lit. This is a tough condition to take nice shots. Try to find a different spot that has the sun in your back, or go here at an earlier or later time in the day when the sun is at a better position.
Backlit shots can be done, but are simply difficult for nice results...
Regarding the overexposure, on sunny days I usually underexpose 1/3 or 2/3 stop (Canon 10D).
Hope this helps.
Eduard

Edit: Michael was faster. Big grin

[Edited 2004-07-18 21:37:03]

User currently offlineLHSebi From Germany, joined Jan 2004, 1049 posts, RR: 8
Reply 3, posted (10 years 2 months 5 days 19 hours ago) and read 2164 times:

Thanks you two! I will try the underexposing next time I go out! I hadn't been using that before.

Sebastian



I guess that's what happens in the end, you start thinking about the beginning.
User currently offlineINNflight From Switzerland, joined Apr 2004, 3766 posts, RR: 59
Reply 4, posted (10 years 2 months 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 2128 times:

Hello Sebastian!

As I use a 300D myself, I'm familiar with your problem!
At the beginning of a spotting day, take a few images of "usual" aircraft ( Lufthansa 737s? ) and check your settings!
Zoom into the images on the LCD screen and then adjust the exposure. Do this, whenever light changes... like clouds in front of the sun, etc...

Regarding the editing... Adobe Photoshop CS has a nice feature, only know the German name, but shouldn't be a problem for you.

Go to Bild - Anpassen - Tiefen / Lichter...

With the Lights feature, you can turn an overexposed image into a normal exposed one, but the quality will drop the more you use it!


Good luck,

Florian



Jet Visuals
User currently offlineMygind66 From Spain, joined May 2004, 1058 posts, RR: 11
Reply 5, posted (10 years 2 months 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 2090 times:

Sebastian..

I don't think the photos are overexposed but as Eduard said light conditions were in the three pics very hard. Looks like you were photographing in PMI in summer time...
Before changing things in the camera take a pic in good light conditions..

Good luck

Enrique


User currently offlineSulman From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 2035 posts, RR: 32
Reply 6, posted (10 years 2 months 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 2034 times:

Sebastian,

Use the 'info' button when looking at your test shots. After a while, you'll become familiar with what the histogram is telling you, and the hardware also has a useful exposure telltale - it will blink the pixels that it considers overexposed. You'll see this alot in areas of blue sky, but it's useful on highlighted parts of aircraft too.

If the sun is out at all, I underexpose at 2/3rds (two notches of the wheel). As Mike says, it's easier to lighten the aircraft during editing if it's a little dark.



It takes a big man to admit they are wrong, and I am not a big man.
User currently offlineEjazz From United Arab Emirates, joined May 2002, 722 posts, RR: 33
Reply 7, posted (10 years 2 months 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 2032 times:

Sebastian

Sulman has mentioned something I find very useful and important, the Histogram. It will show you how well your shot was exposed and what corrections if any are needed. Try and use it.

Good luck

Bailey



Etihad Girl, You're a great way to fly.
User currently offlineLHSebi From Germany, joined Jan 2004, 1049 posts, RR: 8
Reply 8, posted (10 years 2 months 4 days 14 hours ago) and read 1970 times:

Hi all,
Thanks for all the help! So seeing the histogram, as long as the lines don't go over the upper boundary, I am ok with the exposure. Is that a correct assumption? Thanks again!

Sebastian  Big thumbs up



I guess that's what happens in the end, you start thinking about the beginning.
User currently offline2912n From United States of America, joined Oct 2001, 2013 posts, RR: 8
Reply 9, posted (10 years 2 months 4 days 14 hours ago) and read 1967 times:

Here is a link to an article about reading a histogram. (I have the D60 book from these folks...very nice and helpful in easy to understand language.)

Learning to read and understand the histogram can really help you out. Great tool.

http://www.shortcourses.com/10D/histograms.htm#How%20to%20Read%20a%20Histogram


User currently offlineClickhappy From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 9633 posts, RR: 68
Reply 10, posted (10 years 2 months 4 days 13 hours ago) and read 1948 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
PHOTO SCREENER

come on, shooting with a DSLR and not knowing what a histrogram is, or why a backlit shot is underexposed  Insane What is the world coming to?

[Edited 2004-07-20 04:13:28]

User currently offlineBronko From United States of America, joined Jul 2001, 810 posts, RR: 11
Reply 11, posted (10 years 2 months 4 days 9 hours ago) and read 1925 times:

Turn the in camera contrast down one step lower than the default, that will help a lot.


Jet City Aviation Photography
User currently offlineLHSebi From Germany, joined Jan 2004, 1049 posts, RR: 8
Reply 12, posted (10 years 2 months 4 days 4 hours ago) and read 1906 times:

2912n, thanks for the link, I will try to use that next time!

Clickhappy, thanks for your constructive comment. It's always nice to see the more experienced photographers helping the lesser.

Sebastian



I guess that's what happens in the end, you start thinking about the beginning.
User currently offlineJofa From Sweden, joined Apr 2002, 320 posts, RR: 15
Reply 13, posted (10 years 2 months 4 days 4 hours ago) and read 1901 times:

The one thing that will change the appearence of your pictures the most is choosing another time of day to take them. Try early mornings or late evenings when the sun is low, and make sure you have it (the sun) in your back.
BTW, i agree some with clickhappy... people gotta try walking before running =)


User currently offlineLHSebi From Germany, joined Jan 2004, 1049 posts, RR: 8
Reply 14, posted (10 years 2 months 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 1893 times:

BTW, i agree some with clickhappy... people gotta try walking before running =)

Yes, but perhaps some help in the transition is not out of order. Thanks for the tip though, I will try that. A problem with DUS though, is that the sun rises/sets basically at either end of the runway, so you sort of always have the sun in a difficult position.

Sebastian



I guess that's what happens in the end, you start thinking about the beginning.
User currently offlineSulman From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 2035 posts, RR: 32
Reply 15, posted (10 years 2 months 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 1878 times:

Sebastian,

Reading Histograms is something that is best learnt just by going through your own images. It's not terribly complex - you'll get a feel for it after a while. It can also be misleading; try shooting a white aircraft in a bright blue sky: Even with correct exposure the Histogram will look high key, and may even suggest the image is blown.

Also, don't fret about it. This is the kind of mistake you'll tend to avoid once you understand the camera better.



It takes a big man to admit they are wrong, and I am not a big man.
User currently offlineJan Mogren From Sweden, joined Dec 2000, 2043 posts, RR: 50
Reply 16, posted (10 years 2 months 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 1871 times:

>So seeing the histogram, as long as the lines don't go over the upper boundary, I am ok with the exposure. Is that a correct assumption?<

No. You have to check you don't go too much to the right side of the histogram.
/JM



AeroPresentation - Airline DVD's filmed in High Definition
User currently offlineAviopic From Netherlands, joined Mar 2004, 2681 posts, RR: 41
Reply 17, posted (10 years 2 months 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 1820 times:

Another thing is the metering mode you are using.
I suppose you left it in standard evaluation mode which something i can't work with and there for rarely use.
You might try spot(partial) metering instead, it works for me.
For sure when something white(not wide) is coming up.

Good luck.



The truth lives in one’s mind, it doesn’t really exist
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