Sponsor Message:
Aviation Photography Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Best Exposure Settings - Night Photography  
User currently offlineCYEGsTankers From Canada, joined Oct 2004, 245 posts, RR: 1
Posted (9 years 11 months 1 week 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 5660 times:

Fellow contributors,
Question. In regards to night photography, what exposure settings should an Olympus C5050 be on to capture the twinkle of lit aircraft? Mainly the
anti-collision and winglet bulbs? I seem to be missing something.
Any advice much appreciated
Here's the topic.  Smile

http://www.airliners.net/open.file/691918/M/

Richard


[Edited 2004-10-18 19:07:07]

[Edited 2004-10-18 19:08:41]

9 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineMikephotos From United States of America, joined Oct 2000, 2923 posts, RR: 54
Reply 1, posted (9 years 11 months 1 week 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 5597 times:

Any exposure longer than 1-2 seconds should do the job of capturing the beacons. Try longer exposures, adjusting your f-stop to expose properly. A tripod would be recommended so you can take advantage of lower-noise ISO's like 200 instead of having to go 1600.

Mike


User currently offlineCYEGsTankers From Canada, joined Oct 2004, 245 posts, RR: 1
Reply 2, posted (9 years 11 months 1 week 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 5527 times:

Question. In regards to night photography, what exposure settings should an Olympus C5050 be on to capture the twinkle of lit aircraft? Mainly the
anti-collision and winglet bulbs?
To follow up the post here is the photo.
Richard


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Richard Barsby - Aviation Photography CYEG



Thanks Mike I will try adjusting the f-stop more.


User currently offlineMikephotos From United States of America, joined Oct 2000, 2923 posts, RR: 54
Reply 3, posted (9 years 11 months 1 week 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 5513 times:

Richard,

Not familar with the C5050 so can't really help but also a bit confused? You're asking how you to capture the beacons and wingtip lights but yet, you got them in your photo just fine? Longer exposure times with smaller apertures is usually my settings for night shots. To be safe, I'll usually bracket some shots as well.

Mike


User currently offlineStaffan From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (9 years 11 months 1 week 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 5497 times:

If you mean the "star" effect on the lights you need a small aperture. The effect comes from diffraction of the light as it passes through the aperture diaphragm in the lens. The number of "rays" depend on the number of blades in the aperture diaphragm. Usually compact digicams only go down to f/8 so you should try that for the best effect, if possible even smaller. There are also star filters that give a similar effect.

Staffan


User currently offlineGmonney From Canada, joined Jan 2001, 2159 posts, RR: 20
Reply 5, posted (9 years 11 months 1 week 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 5485 times:

Most of my pictures are around 4 seconds and with my old camera i would set the apature at F8.0 the highest the camera would go. The ISO should be at 100 for the best results... just play around with it.... i would say set the apature at F8.0 and play around with the shutter speed.

Grant



Drive it like you stole it!
User currently offlineMikephotos From United States of America, joined Oct 2000, 2923 posts, RR: 54
Reply 6, posted (9 years 11 months 1 week 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 5481 times:

Ah, thanks for clearing that up Staffan, wasn't sure what he meant.

Mike


User currently offlineCYEGsTankers From Canada, joined Oct 2004, 245 posts, RR: 1
Reply 7, posted (9 years 11 months 1 week 23 hours ago) and read 5398 times:

Sorry, yes thats exactly what my question was refering to.
"star" effect on the lights.
I see so many night photos that have that effect and want to make that a goal of mine.
Richard


User currently offlineLindy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (9 years 11 months 1 week 22 hours ago) and read 5365 times:

Here is little plug  Big grin
I took this picture at F/11 - 5 seconds exposure.


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Rafal Szczypek



Rafal


User currently offlineJeffM From United States of America, joined May 2005, 3266 posts, RR: 51
Reply 9, posted (9 years 11 months 1 week 22 hours ago) and read 5331 times:

".."star" effect on the lights..."

..an inexpensive star filter is the easiest way. They come in many different point densities. But, you can also take a woman's nylons and stretch them firmly over the lens and rubber banded to get the same effect in a clinch....


Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
Night Photography: Questions posted Tue Nov 7 2006 11:48:14 by AirbusA346
Night Photography Rejection... posted Wed Oct 25 2006 23:34:20 by Atomother
Best Spotting Settings For A EOS Digital Rebel posted Sun Sep 17 2006 23:50:11 by Airlinelover
Night Photography Tips Required posted Sat Aug 13 2005 22:48:06 by Stu1978
Night Photography - Advice? posted Sat Jan 1 2005 18:23:48 by Philhyde
Best Scanner For Aviation Photography posted Thu Jul 1 2004 19:33:24 by Aa7E7
Help With Night Photography posted Thu May 13 2004 08:42:15 by Concord977
Trigger Device For Night Photography posted Sun Feb 8 2004 09:08:50 by Paulinbna
Hand Held Action Night Photography Is Painful posted Fri Nov 14 2003 03:00:31 by Clickhappy
Best Aircraft Museums For Photography? posted Fri Aug 15 2003 06:57:38 by Pilothighflyer