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Your Best Editing Tip....  
User currently offlineGlennstewart From Australia, joined Jun 2003, 1124 posts, RR: 54
Posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 8887 times:

Hi All,

There are many new DSLR photographers coming on board.
Given the necessity to edit DSLR shots prior to upload to Airliners.net, I thought it would be a great idea to start a simple thread about editing tips.

Rather than provide a whole workflow (which would bore everyone to death), please reply with your best possible recommendation with editing.

i.e. the tip you could give someone new, that they may not have otherwise tried.

Glenn Stewart


Respected users.... If my replies are useful, then by all means...
35 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineGlennstewart From Australia, joined Jun 2003, 1124 posts, RR: 54
Reply 1, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 8858 times:

I'll kick off with this one:

Crop/Resize in one step with Photoshop

1. When using crop tool, place the size you wish to crop to in the width/height boxes in tool bar.
I use:
[1200 px] [800 px]

2. Draw box around area you wish to crop and resize to

3. Press enter


Glenn Stewart



Respected users.... If my replies are useful, then by all means...
User currently offlineChrisH From Sweden, joined Jul 2004, 1136 posts, RR: 16
Reply 2, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 8826 times:


And my tip would be incremental downsizing, wich improves quality! I.e go from full res > 2500px > 2000 etc. in about 4-5 steps.

this also enables you to improve on a pic that might not have been tack sharp from the beginning, as you can sharpen various areas in different stages. It takes some experimenting though.



what seems to be the officer, problem?
User currently offlineINNflight From Switzerland, joined Apr 2004, 3766 posts, RR: 59
Reply 3, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 8820 times:

Might sound a bit stupid, but try to shoot like there is no editing!
Of course finding the perfect settings for a day is not always easy, but you should try.
I often hear people saying "it's overexposed ( or not level, badcontrast,etc ) but I can fix this later on anyway."

Sure you can, but quality will not be the same.

Florian



Jet Visuals
User currently offlineSulman From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 2035 posts, RR: 32
Reply 4, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 8811 times:

Simple sharpening technique I use:

1) Create a duplicate layer of your unsharpened image.
2) Apply USM to this layer.
3) Identify prominent jaggies.
4) Use the eraser tool at opacity settings between 50% and 100% and 'rub out' the jaggies. Sounds weird but it works.

USM settings:

If the image is at 1024 pixels wide, I start with 500% radius 0.2 threshold 0. Sounds alot but it's actually a very, very fine application of USM, and seldom works at all well on images larger than 1024.

If working larger than 1024, I start at 300%, radius 0.3, and threshold 0. This is typically too strong, and I scale back the percentage setting to something between 100-250.

My ultimate aim is to use enough to not have to remove any jaggies, although of course this is sometimes inevitable.

Cheers


James



It takes a big man to admit they are wrong, and I am not a big man.
User currently offlineINNflight From Switzerland, joined Apr 2004, 3766 posts, RR: 59
Reply 5, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 8787 times:

I think everybody can learn here, thank you for the ( just tried, very good! ) tips James!


Jet Visuals
User currently offlineKlgaviation From United States of America, joined Jun 2004, 243 posts, RR: 3
Reply 6, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 8750 times:

Manually adjust color balance!!!

It can make all the difference...

Chris



There is a fine line between a picture and a photo. The latter seems to be disappearing.
User currently offlineJavibi From Spain, joined Oct 2004, 1371 posts, RR: 41
Reply 7, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 8702 times:

Very interesting thread!

Most of you know about it, but when I was even more than a newbie than now, to find out about this leveling technique, explained here by Jan Mogren, was very useful:

http://www.airliners.net/discussions/aviation_photography/read.main/76567/6/

Saludos

j

P.S: James, I just tried your tip and I like it! Thanks.



"Be prepared to engage in constructive debate". Are YOU prepared?
User currently offlineFergulmcc From Ireland, joined Oct 2004, 1916 posts, RR: 52
Reply 8, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 8683 times:

This is a great thread, keep them it comming!  Big thumbs up

I'm new but one thing I found usefull is Neat Image. It really does clean up your photo and make it look clear and crisp, if you can say that.

Cheers

Fergul Big grin

PS Thanks for that link Saludos, good read. I've also tried James's tip works well!! Thanks Guys  Big thumbs up



Zambian Airways, Where the Eagles fly free!!
User currently offlineWietse From Netherlands, joined Oct 2001, 3809 posts, RR: 55
Reply 9, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 8667 times:

Beware of applications like NeatImage. They are not meant to be used in all photographs, you should only use them if conditions forced you to shoot at a high ISO speed. In my 2 years DSLR useage, I have never seen the need for something like neatimage. Never. (aviation wise that is)


Wietse de Graaf
User currently offlineJavibi From Spain, joined Oct 2004, 1371 posts, RR: 41
Reply 10, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 8633 times:

Wietse

That's because you do not shoot high ISO handheld cockpit shots!  Smile

Seriously, I agree, NeatImage and the like have to be applied carefully and in rare occasions. But it can save some shots nevertheless.

Regards

j



"Be prepared to engage in constructive debate". Are YOU prepared?
User currently offlinePsych From United Kingdom, joined Nov 2004, 3048 posts, RR: 58
Reply 11, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 8605 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

On this Neat Image issue - as my telephoto shots are not taken with a pro lens they do require a decent amount of sharpening to get them up to scratch. This does usually cause grain in the sky (or other similar featureless aspects of the image) and I have found that Neat Image does a really good job of eradicating this self-created graininess without having an adverse effect on the detailed image.

Back to the main thread - one of the key issues I have learned is not to apply sharpening until the photo has been resized. The USM obviously has an effect on the pixels and it took me a bit of time to realize that the full size image out of the camera responds very differently to the sharpening process than does, say, a 1200 wide image.

For me, the sharpening process, together with sorting out the Levels histogram to get the correct settings for the image, are the most crucial things. I would also agree with James above that his suggested strategy for removing jaggies is an excellent skill to learn - again, especially for those of us who need to apply a reasonable amount of sharpening to get the photo looking right.

Paul


User currently offlineIL76 From Netherlands, joined Jan 2004, 2237 posts, RR: 48
Reply 12, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 8590 times:

This does usually cause grain in the sky.

Tip: Do not sharpen the sky (or any other patches without detail).

Simply because there is nothing to sharpen in the sky. Photoshop will still try to sharpen, causing grain to come out. Solution: Deselect the sky by first selecting it using the magic wand tool and then inversing the selection.

Eduard


User currently offlineLindy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 13, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 8586 times:

Glennstewart,

Now I'm using your tip  Smile Its working fine and saves some time  Smile

Thanks,
Rafal


User currently offlineDendrobatid From United Kingdom, joined Nov 2004, 1668 posts, RR: 61
Reply 14, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 8561 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
HEAD SCREENER

There is another thread 'Ideal upload size' which seems to be running along the same lines as this one.
I have put some comments about thresholds and USM on there that might be of interest but I won't repeat them here.
Have a look if you're interested
Mick Bajcar


User currently offlineMfz From Germany, joined Aug 2004, 259 posts, RR: 2
Reply 15, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 8535 times:

@ IL76

Maybe a stupid question, but I'll post it anyway...  Wink/being sarcastic:

How can you only sharpen parts of a photo and for exapmle leave the sky out? I see what you mean about the sky just getting grainy as it is already sharp most of the times, but how do I actually exclude the sky when applying USM? Thanks for hint...

Best regards,

Michael



Extra Bavariam non est vita et si est non est ita! --- My flights: http://my.flightmemory.com/mfz
User currently offlineF9Widebody From United States of America, joined Sep 2003, 1604 posts, RR: 10
Reply 16, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 8521 times:

You must use any of the selection tools to select only the plane. What IL76 was referring to is using the magic wand to select the sky (since it ususally of one color) and then go to Selection > Inverse (I believe it is) so that instead of the sky being selected, the plane will. You could also just use the lasso tool to select the plane if you want. Holding Ctrl / Alt while selecting will also add to or remove from your current selection, allowing you to select in increments.

Regards



YES URLS in signature!!!
User currently offlineFergulmcc From Ireland, joined Oct 2004, 1916 posts, RR: 52
Reply 17, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 8522 times:

As Eduard says

Use the magic want in the tool selection, click on the sky and then the sky will be selected. Then right click on the sky and a menu will appear with it will be inverse selection.

Thanks Eduard

Fergul  Big thumbs up



Zambian Airways, Where the Eagles fly free!!
User currently offlineChrisH From Sweden, joined Jul 2004, 1136 posts, RR: 16
Reply 18, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 8511 times:


another good method is using quickmask mode.

press Q once
press B to select brush, rightclick somewhere to select size of brush and type.
paint the aircraft (use a soft brush, doesnt matter if some sky gets painted)
press Q again. Now you have a selection of the sky or the plane depending on your quickmask settings.

press Ctrl + shift + I to inverse selection if needed.

then apply your sharpening or colorcorrection or whatever you want.




what seems to be the officer, problem?
User currently offlineSulman From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 2035 posts, RR: 32
Reply 19, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 8513 times:

The threshold figure for the magic wand is very useful - it determines how sensitive the algorithm that controls the magic wand is. If you've got an a/c that has a colourful background you will find that the magic wand has trouble picking it out - lower the threshold and you can use the shift key & left mouse button to add more of a selection, and alt & LMB to subtract an area from the selection. Experimentation is the key.

With regard to the layer USM tip, I forgot to mention that you must select layers>merge down when you're done, or you will have a big fat .psd file when you come to save it.


Cheers


James

Edit: Incidentally I should mention that one of the USM tips originated from Gary Watt, who is a screener here, and the other came from a Canon document posted by Colin Work.

[Edited 2005-01-04 18:32:02]


It takes a big man to admit they are wrong, and I am not a big man.
User currently offlineErwin972 From Netherlands, joined May 2004, 500 posts, RR: 44
Reply 20, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 8502 times:

Ah, Photoshop tips, I can't stop myself from throwing in another easy trick.


How to spice up dull pictures, boost some colors and contrast etc. in a simple way and with a redo possibility?



1. Load a picture
2. Go to the "Layers" window and click on "Create adjustment layer"
3. Here you can look at the histogram
4. Make adjustments by dragging the triangles. Best thing to do is to drag the outer triangles a bit to the inside but don't let them overlap the black in the histogram-graphic.
5. Hit OK

You now have levels on a layer: anytime you want you can make some more adjustments!

This method creates some dramatic improvement and is way more preferable then the "auto-levels" function.

Not happy with the results? Open the adjustment layer (double-click) hit "Alt" and you will see a reset button.

Some more advanced info: you can adjust the 3 basic colors independently. By clicking "alt" and simultaneously dragging the triangles you can view in the picture which parts are going to be overblown or underexposed. With the middle triangle you can adjust grey point and experiment some more with brighter/darker.


Kind regards,
Erwin



My gear: Nikon, Sony, Red, Sachtler etc.
User currently offlinePsych From United Kingdom, joined Nov 2004, 3048 posts, RR: 58
Reply 21, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 8481 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Eduard

I was aware of that as an idea - to deselect the area you don't want to be sharpened. But I have found that even if you mess with the feathering figure you can often see in the resulting picture the 'join' between the selected and deselected bits of the photo. Maybe I should work harder getting that feathering done better, but when you live in Manchester so many of your shots are taken with cloud that deselecting the sky and not something else becomes an art in its own right - so much messing with the threshold figure is necessary. Smile

Paul


User currently offlineIL76 From Netherlands, joined Jan 2004, 2237 posts, RR: 48
Reply 22, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 8451 times:

Hi, back again...

Ok, when using the magic wand tool, not everything is selected the first time you click in the sky (I generally use threshold 5-10). If you press "shift" as you click other parts in the sky, they get added to the selection. If you accidently select a piece of the aircraft aswell, undo the last addition and lower the threshold and try again until you have the whole sky (or other detail-less areas) selected. Then inverse the selection.
To prevent the inverted selection now also containing the edges of the airplane, I expand the selection with one pixel (selection>modify>expand). Then I do my first round of USM (low setting 50, 0.3, 0). Then I expand the selection again with one pixel and go for the next round of USM, and so forth until I get the sharpening I want (There's the solution to seeing the the edge of your selection, Paul!). This whole excersize can also be done using feathering, but I do it like described above.

Also, an extra plus to not sharpening the sky is the reduced file size when saving. JPEG can do more compression on low detail areas. If your sky is grainy, your file size will be larger...

Cheers,
Eduard


User currently offlineAviopic From Netherlands, joined Mar 2004, 2681 posts, RR: 41
Reply 23, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 8380 times:

Crop/Resize in one step with Photoshop
1. When using crop tool, place the size you wish to crop to in the width/height boxes in tool bar.
I use:
[1200 px] [800 px]
2. Draw box around area you wish to crop and resize to
3. Press enter


This is exactly the method i use but with one difference, i fill the resolution box as well for web purposes with 96dpi.
It keeps the file size down and the extra resolution isn't used anyway.


Tip: Do not sharpen the sky (or any other patches without detail).

Simply because there is nothing to sharpen in the sky. Photoshop will still try to sharpen, causing grain to come out. Solution: Deselect the sky by first selecting it using the magic wand tool and then inversing the selection.

Good tip Eduard something i do all the time in a different way though.
Try Fred Miranda's sharpening pro with the levels and sharpening tweak enabled which gives you the perfect tool to isolate the subject from the background before sharpening.
If you still find to much noise in the sky simply select it with the magic wand and use the smart blur filter(lightly).
Don't use thingies like Neatimage or other tools as Wietse already mentioned, the only thing they do is blurring the whole image.


Willem




The truth lives in one’s mind, it doesn’t really exist
User currently offlineWietse From Netherlands, joined Oct 2001, 3809 posts, RR: 55
Reply 24, posted (9 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 8387 times:

I wholeheartedly agree with Willem. Get the appropiate FM Intellisharpen plugin (there are different versions for every camera). My basic workflow is like this:

1. Open image in PS CS RAW convertor
2. Fine tune the exposure
3. add 1 or 2 with the "shadows" slider
4. Bump the contrast
5. bump the saturation

Convert

6. Check if the pic is level, if not, rotate using the Jan Mogren method
7. Crop to exclude borders (while keeping the same aspect ratio for ATI)
8. Adjust the levels of the image by enclosing the histogram (like Edwin's pic)
9. Run Fred Miranda's Intellisharpen plugin on the full size image. (highest setting)
10. resize to 1024 wide
11. Add 1 or 2 passes of 50%, 0.2, 0 Unsharp mask over the image to make up for the softness caused by step 10.
12. Save as a JPEG at quality level 12
13. resize to 800x533
14. one more pass of US like in step 11
15. Save in my ATI folder

This is what I do to the images that I send to A.net and ATI. For just a normal A.net image, leave out steps 13-15.

Good luck  Big grin



Wietse de Graaf
25 Jan Mogren : >fill the resolution box as well for web purposes with 96dpi.
26 ChrisH : Willen: Filling in 96dpi wont do diddly squat. First of all monitors are 72dpi. Secondly, thats the only resolution the picture can be shown in on a m
27 Post contains images Aviopic : I have to confess that i never really tried Jan and Chris just figured that a 96ppi file would be smaller then a 300ppi file, i will give it a go thou
28 9A-CRO : a trick to improve dull or hazy colours: use USM with following parameters: Amount:20% Radius:40 pix Thr:0 try moving radius a bit down or up for bett
29 Benyhone : I like Florian's idea. Realistically though, my goal is to keep workflow to a minimum. When you shoot a variety of subjects for a variety of purposes
30 Post contains links and images Sulman : A little more on the USM layer technique: 1) Start with the image you want to sharpen, in this case, a pretty flat ERJ145 shot. 2) Go to the 'layers'
31 Post contains images Erwin972 : One more tip for an efficient Photoshop use: ACTIONS. With pre-made actions you can automate regular tasks with photoshop and this makes life a lot e
32 Glennstewart : I must thank everyone for their brilliant tips. I'm sure none of us know every trick under the sun... I've been going through trying out many of the a
33 Post contains images Fergulmcc : Can I just ask what photshop you's are using, Certain tools like the measure tool in the link that Saludos posted is not available on the PS Elements
34 Erwin972 : That would be Photoshop CS over here. Mmm, I have the Adobe user guide book still wrapped in plastic. Should read it during the next holiday or so. K
35 Mfz : Hi guys! Thanks a lot to all of you who replied to my questions of how to only select/unselect the sky! I will try the different methods before my nex
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