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Advice For Shooting Slide Film For The First Time.  
User currently offlineArmitageShanks From UK - England, joined Dec 2003, 3609 posts, RR: 15
Posted (9 years 3 months 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 8570 times:

Hey everyone.

I just got a Minolta X-370 with a 50mm f1.7 lens and I want to mess around with slide film. I really have no clue how it differs from regular print film. I was wondering if any of you can point me in the right direction where I can find some advice on what to do.

Of you slide shooters, what should I do to get the basics down? I don't want to do any aviation photography, btw.

18 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineN101AA From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 14 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (9 years 3 months 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 8570 times:

Quoting ArmitageShanks (Thread starter):
I don't want to do any aviation photography

Then why post in an Aviation Photography forum? There are plenty of other places on the 'net to get photography advice...


User currently offlineMartinairYYZ From Canada, joined Nov 2003, 1209 posts, RR: 7
Reply 2, posted (9 years 3 months 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 8561 times:

Quoting N101AA (Reply 1):
Then why post in an Aviation Photography forum? There are plenty of other places on the 'net to get photography advice...

I thought people int he photography forum had respect! Bah!

Weel Armitageshanks, the best slide film to really show off the colours is undoubtedly Fuji Velvia...... try it, or Fuji Provia out to get the most amazing colours (with correct exposure ofcourse) that you will see..... especially great for landscapes! Other than that, Kodak Ektachrome (spelling?) and Kodachrome are the best general-use colour slide films.... off to be dnow, but if you need more help,. just ask!

Cheers



Chelsea Football Club supporter.
User currently offlineWietse From Netherlands, joined Oct 2001, 3809 posts, RR: 55
Reply 3, posted (9 years 3 months 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 8552 times:

Quoting N101AA (Reply 1):
Then why post in an Aviation Photography forum? There are plenty of other places on the 'net to get photography advice...

Yeah, what the hell is this about?

Whatever...

Pinning the exposure just right is most important. There is no Photoshop here. It has to be spot on. For the rest it is just a matter of personal preference.

Wietse



Wietse de Graaf
User currently offlineArmitageShanks From UK - England, joined Dec 2003, 3609 posts, RR: 15
Reply 4, posted (9 years 3 months 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 8535 times:

Thanks to all of you that have advised me so far. It seems bracketing would be ideal for slide film. I shall get some Fuji Velvia and Fuji Provia and see how those come out.
___________________

N101AA, you waste two of your 8 total posts to tell me off? Nice.

I figured I would get more mileage in the PHOTOGRAPHY forum than the non-aviation forum. Maybe you should suggest deletion of this thread.

[Edited 2005-04-28 06:31:44]

User currently offlineTimdeGroot From Netherlands, joined Apr 2002, 3674 posts, RR: 65
Reply 5, posted (9 years 3 months 22 hours ago) and read 8511 times:
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Try bracketing your exposure, by -0.3 stops.

Tim



Alderman Exit
User currently offlineStealthZ From Australia, joined Feb 2005, 5678 posts, RR: 45
Reply 6, posted (9 years 3 months 20 hours ago) and read 8490 times:
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Hi,
Yes bracketing is important... wish I had done it more often when shooting slide film. Biggest thing to remember is it does not have the latitude of negative film... but when you get everything right.. you will be blown away by the image!!

regards

Chris



If your camera sends text messages, that could explain why your photos are rubbish!
User currently offlineN949WP From Hong Kong, joined Feb 2000, 1437 posts, RR: 1
Reply 7, posted (9 years 3 months 19 hours ago) and read 8484 times:

With regard to slide film, it's better to err on the side of underexposure. A good deal of details can be retrieved from the dark areas of an underexposed slide when you put it through a scanner and make the right adjustments. Whereas for an over-exposed slide, the details lost in the overblown highlights tend to be irrecoverable. That's just my experience.

Oh BTW, avoid Velvia if you're photographing people. The intense colors and contrast of Velvia will make your subjects look weird and unnatural.

'949


User currently offlineDC10Tim From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2005, 1406 posts, RR: 14
Reply 8, posted (9 years 3 months 16 hours ago) and read 8449 times:

Quoting N949WP (Reply 7):
Oh BTW, avoid Velvia if you're photographing people. The intense colors and contrast of Velvia will make your subjects look weird and unnatural.

Agreed. My dad shoots on 35mm and put a Velvia 100 roll through his Minolta Dynax 5 last summer. The colours were horrible. Very, very saturated.

Stick to Fuji Provia 100F if you're wanting the very best quality and accurate colours. It's one of (if not the) finest grain films on the market.

Tim.



Obviously missing something....
User currently offlineArmitageShanks From UK - England, joined Dec 2003, 3609 posts, RR: 15
Reply 9, posted (9 years 3 months 14 hours ago) and read 8420 times:

Thanks. I would be using it for people photography more than anything, so I guess I will stick with Provia 100F.

User currently offlineSulman From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 2035 posts, RR: 32
Reply 10, posted (9 years 3 months 14 hours ago) and read 8418 times:

You'll get some top results with that 50mm 1.7 - should look beautiful if you're doing portrait work.

James



It takes a big man to admit they are wrong, and I am not a big man.
User currently offlineAviopic From Netherlands, joined Mar 2004, 2681 posts, RR: 42
Reply 11, posted (9 years 3 months 13 hours ago) and read 8403 times:

Quoting MartinairYYZ (Reply 2):
the best slide film to really show off the colours is undoubtedly Fuji Velvia

Yes but your equipment needs to be top with a fast lens.

Quoting DC10Tim (Reply 8):
My dad shoots on 35mm and put a Velvia 100

Velvia 100 ? thought Velvia comes in 50 only..... in my days as slide shooter for sure.
Most common for aviation is Kodak K64 though although I never liked it.
Personally I have always been in favor of Velvia which I used with an ISO setting of 40 but I would recommend it to you as a first time user because they are expensive.
My advice would be to go for Provia 100 and/or 400F both are very good and a bit more allround.

Good luck,
Willem



The truth lives in one’s mind, it doesn’t really exist
User currently offlineWietse From Netherlands, joined Oct 2001, 3809 posts, RR: 55
Reply 12, posted (9 years 3 months 12 hours ago) and read 8393 times:

Velvia 100 is a new slidefilm Willem  Wink

If you want to start off, just use Sensia. A little more grain, but much cheaper.

Wietse



Wietse de Graaf
User currently offlineAviopic From Netherlands, joined Mar 2004, 2681 posts, RR: 42
Reply 13, posted (9 years 3 months 12 hours ago) and read 8383 times:

Quoting Wietse (Reply 12):
Velvia 100 is a new slidefilm Willem

A very nice way to say you "old bugger"    Wietse 
Still in the US ? .......... let's hope they keep you there   
hehe

ps. still i think Provia F is the best option, it's not expensive and a lot better then Sensia........ in my days of course.  Smile

[Edited 2005-04-28 20:43:27]


The truth lives in one’s mind, it doesn’t really exist
User currently offlineTimdeGroot From Netherlands, joined Apr 2002, 3674 posts, RR: 65
Reply 14, posted (9 years 3 months 11 hours ago) and read 8372 times:
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From what I've heard the current Ektachrome is pretty good. Never tried it myself though.

Provia is the best allrounder I think, and you can push to 200 without much problems. Personally I don't like Provia's color and find it somewhat softer in the edges than K64, which is still my film of choice.

Plan to do more slideshooting myself this summer, there's just something magical to it that you don't get with digital Wink

Cheers
Tim



Alderman Exit
User currently offlineStaffan From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 15, posted (9 years 3 months 11 hours ago) and read 8371 times:

I don't like ektachrome, I found the colours to be a bit "milky" and low contrast compared to provia and kodachrome.

Staffan


User currently offlineKey From Netherlands, joined Feb 2005, 99 posts, RR: 2
Reply 16, posted (9 years 3 months 11 hours ago) and read 8371 times:

Being a slides-only guy, I agree with the others. Velvia can be great for nature, especially flowers, but my main film is Provia 100F. It has the sharpness and cost of KR64 (or even a bit lower) but the speed and easiness of development of Sensia - in Europe, that is. For test purposes, shoot away with Sensia at half the price, and expect to adapt only to its quality when changing to Provia.

Exposure generally is equal to negative film, with the already made very important remark that if being a bit off you should be on the dark side. I hardly ever bracket, only when in real doubt. With your typical aircraft against a bright grey sky-situation a +.7 correction usually does the trick. Spot metering is tricky and has to be used really well, but center-weighted metering can do magic for moving aircraft.

Enjoy!
Erik



... slides!
User currently offlineStealthZ From Australia, joined Feb 2005, 5678 posts, RR: 45
Reply 17, posted (9 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 8336 times:
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Quoting Aviopic (Reply 11):
Personally I have always been in favor of Velvia which I used with an ISO setting of 40

Never quite understood this, Always been told, and had great success with slide film like EK100 etc by underexposing a bit ie setting EK100 at ISO125. Setting Velvia50 at ISO40 would result in overexposure.. at least in my understanding.

Regards

Chris



If your camera sends text messages, that could explain why your photos are rubbish!
User currently offlineTimz From United States of America, joined Sep 1999, 6785 posts, RR: 7
Reply 18, posted (9 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 8308 times:

"Thanks. I would be using it for people photography more than anything..."

Get somebody to loan you an 85 or 105 mm lens. When you try it you'll probably prefer it to the 50 mm.

I think you'll eventually find bracketing isn't as vital as guys make it sound. Shoot a scene twice, a half-stop apart, and many times you won't be able to decide which one you like better. In other words, "correct" exposure isn't always obvious. If you're out in the sun you'll eventually learn what exposure works there and then you can just stick with that, maybe making slight adjustments for the sun's altitude above the horizon.


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