Sponsor Message:
Aviation Photography Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Canon 300D Settings  
User currently offlineEGFF From UK - Wales, joined Sep 2001, 2201 posts, RR: 12
Posted (9 years 1 month 3 weeks 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 5002 times:

Firstly, i do apologise if this is a subject that has popped up time after time, i tried a search of the forum but couldn't find anything.
I got myself a Canon 300D and am in the process of scanning through the manual trying to get myself familiarised with the different settings, buttons, etc.
I was just wondering what's the best setting to use for taking pics, so if you have a 300D any feedback is very much appreciated.
Regards,
Shaun


All together or not at all
66 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineSean377 From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2001, 1225 posts, RR: 41
Reply 1, posted (9 years 1 month 3 weeks 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 4985 times:

I'm in much the same position as you. I think the camera make and model is not so important, moreso the lens that's on the front of it. What I've learned so far is that all lenses are different, some producing softer images than others (particularly zooms at the extents of their ranges) and that many lenses produce their sharpest image at around f/8 - f/11. For that reason, a lot of people shoot in Av mode (aperture priority) to ensure that's what they get. From my (limited) experience, this produces adequate shutter speeds on a fine day.

Sean
EGNT

[Edited 2005-06-04 13:07:39]


Flying is the second greatest thrill known to man... Landing is the first!
User currently offlineQantasA332 From Australia, joined Dec 2003, 1500 posts, RR: 26
Reply 2, posted (9 years 1 month 3 weeks 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 4983 times:

I don't use a 300D myself, but pretty much everyone I know who does recommends f/8.0 as the ideal f-stop quality-wise. So, if conditions are such that you get acceptable shutter speeds for the particular situation you're in, I suppose f/8.0 in Av mode would be good.

That's a start, I'm sure many experienced 300D users will jump in with more tips...  Wink

Cheers,
Gabriel


User currently offlineJkw777 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (9 years 1 month 3 weeks 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 4979 times:

Hello Shaun,

Firstly, Welcome to the world of Digital Photography using a DSLR.

There are no "best settings" for taking pictures, but it is easy enough to determine which settings are best for different conditions.

In sunny conditions, usually it is best to set your camera to the following:
Using "AV" Mode, ISO - ISO100, Aperture - f/8.0 or there abouts

If the conditions are somewhat cloudier, some factors need to change:
Using "AV" Mode, ISO - ISO200, Aperture - f/5.6-f/8.0

I would definitely do a lot of trial and error work when out shooting different conditions, to familiarise yourself with the camera and the different weather conditions as there are no basic settings.

Don't be too disappointed if you return from the airport with a card full of wasted images, the whole process of digital photography is a learning curve for all of us.

Good luck, regards,

Justin  Smile


User currently offlineDC10Tim From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2005, 1406 posts, RR: 14
Reply 4, posted (9 years 1 month 3 weeks 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 4957 times:

Hi Shaun,

I always shoot in Av mode and ideally with an aperture of between f8 and f11. Try not to use anything above ISO 200 if the light permits.

One thing I have found with shooting at f8 though this week, is to be careful when taking a photo of something close that is at an angle to you. The depth of field isn't as large as I expected and it's possible to get the rear of the aircraft out of focus slightly.

Regards,

Tim.



Obviously missing something....
User currently offlineJkw777 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (9 years 1 month 3 weeks 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 4952 times:

Quoting DC10Tim (Reply 4):
One thing I have found with shooting at f8 though this week, is to be careful when taking a photo of something close that is at an angle to you. The depth of field isn't as large as I expected and it's possible to get the rear of the aircraft out of focus slightly.

In that instance you would need to reduce the aperture to f/11.0 +, to increase DOF.

Regards,
Justin  Smile


User currently offlineSean377 From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2001, 1225 posts, RR: 41
Reply 6, posted (9 years 1 month 3 weeks 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 4952 times:

Quoting DC10Tim (Reply 4):
One thing I have found with shooting at f8 though this week, is to be careful when taking a photo of something close that is at an angle to you. The depth of field isn't as large as I expected and it's possible to get the rear of the aircraft out of focus slightly.

I'd noticed this too. Shooting a long-ish aircraft that is coming towards you may need the aperture nudged a few stops (towards f22). But watch the shutter speeds!

I agree about shooting in the lowest ISO that the light permits (I believe the Nikon D70 starts at ISO200. Is this a not a drawback?).

Sean



Flying is the second greatest thrill known to man... Landing is the first!
User currently offlineJkw777 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (9 years 1 month 3 weeks 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 4948 times:

Quoting Sean377 (Reply 6):
(I believe the Nikon D70 starts at ISO200. Is this a not a drawback?).

That is correct, but to be honest it's not a significant draw back in the grand scheme of things.

Cheers,
Justin  Smile


User currently offlineDC10Tim From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2005, 1406 posts, RR: 14
Reply 8, posted (9 years 1 month 3 weeks 2 days 15 hours ago) and read 4900 times:

Quoting Jkw777 (Reply 5):
In that instance you would need to reduce the aperture to f/11.0 +, to increase DOF.

Yeah I'd not encountered any trouble on f8 before, at the viewing park at MAN, for example, where you can get quite close. It was earlier last week when I was at Doncaster where the taxiway is VERY close to the fence and the 737 I was shooting was coming at an angle. The rear end of the aircraft turned out to be slightly blurred.

Quoting Sean377 (Reply 6):
I agree about shooting in the lowest ISO that the light permits (I believe the Nikon D70 starts at ISO200. Is this a not a drawback?).

All the Nikon lovers will linch me for saying this, but it would really put me off only being able to go down to ISO 200. I'm sure they still produce reasonable pics though  Wink



Obviously missing something....
User currently offlineChrisH From Sweden, joined Jul 2004, 1136 posts, RR: 16
Reply 9, posted (9 years 1 month 3 weeks 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 4884 times:

It's actually kind of a relief not having ISO 100, cause ISO 200 is noise-free and I get better speeds = sharper shots. It could be a drawback in other types of photography tho.


what seems to be the officer, problem?
User currently offlineFlyingZacko From Germany, joined May 2005, 583 posts, RR: 6
Reply 10, posted (9 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 4815 times:

Hi Shaun,

this is my first post on A.net, but I hope I can still be of some help to you. I actually do own an EOS 300D and a couple of weeks ago I bought an 28-300mm lens for it too. With the new lens it was like starting all over again. What you want to do at this time of the year, since there are a lot of hours in the sun, is to shoot at an ISO of 100 or 200 at the most since the higher the ISO, the more grain your picture will have. I either take my shots in the P mode, or in the Av mode. P stands for program where you can select the AF sensors, instead of shooting on the complete automated mode where you can't adjust anything. When shooting in the Av mode on the other hand, you can adjust the aperture settings. Like others have said before you should go with something close to f8.0 since with this kind of aperture you will be able to shoot at good shutter speeds, but your shots will also have good overall sharpness usually. That is what you mainly want to look out for when taking shots, and also the lighting plays a factor, but you might already know which type of light is good for shots and which is not. If you need further advice, do not hesitate to ask.

Cheers,


Sebastian



Canon 40D + 24-70 f/2.8 L + 70-200 f/4 L + Speedlite 430EX
User currently offlineEGFF From UK - Wales, joined Sep 2001, 2201 posts, RR: 12
Reply 11, posted (9 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 4775 times:

I'd like to thank everyone that has contributed to this post, it has helped alot and given me a rough idea of the basics.
I wont have a chance to get to the airport till this coming thursday, according to the forcast it's gonna be warm and sunny so AV mode sounds good with ISO 100 and f8.0, it's a start for me so i will try that out and see how i get on.
Just one more thing, i see that there a quite a few quality options, there are 2 options each for Large, Medium and Small and then onviously RAW but i was just wondering what you guys mainly use?
Thanks once again for the feedback,
Shaun



All together or not at all
User currently offlineAirplanepics From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2003, 2730 posts, RR: 41
Reply 12, posted (9 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 4772 times:

Quoting EGFF (Reply 11):
Just one more thing, i see that there a quite a few quality options, there are 2 options each for Large, Medium and Small and then onviously RAW but i was just wondering what you guys mainly use?

Only use Large (the top one on the menu).

When you feel confident, you could switch over to RAW.....but That's all down to personal preference.



Simon - London-Aviation.com
User currently offlineFlyingZacko From Germany, joined May 2005, 583 posts, RR: 6
Reply 13, posted (9 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 4765 times:

I was trying to quote Airplanepics response, but I didn't know how. Sorry for that, but he's exactly right. I only use Large as well. When you are shooting on RAW however there is no "interpretation" there yet however, like for instance when you shoot on Large it will be a jpeg and for that certain format the information contained by the picture is interpreted with a this (jpeg) algorithm. RAW however is really huge size-wise compared to Large and so long I have been satiesfied with the Large setting.

Sebastian



Canon 40D + 24-70 f/2.8 L + 70-200 f/4 L + Speedlite 430EX
User currently offlineDvmpaunch From Canada, joined Aug 2000, 68 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (9 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 4761 times:

I have a question. What internal settings do you guys use? ie: saturation colour etc. I think I've mastered the f8.0 factor but I always have to do a lot of photoshop to get the colours just right on the 300D.

Regards
Darryl


User currently offlineQantasA332 From Australia, joined Dec 2003, 1500 posts, RR: 26
Reply 15, posted (9 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 4741 times:

Quoting Dvmpaunch (Reply 14):
What internal settings do you guys use? ie: saturation colour etc.

It's usually best to select the most neutral in-camera parameters, and adjust everything in photoshop (yes, you may always have to do a lot, however DSLRs are designed with post-processing in mind). Again, I'm not a 300D user, however I believe the neutral parameter on the 300D is Parameter 2.

Cheers,
Gabriel


User currently offlineJumboJim747 From Australia, joined Oct 2004, 2464 posts, RR: 45
Reply 16, posted (9 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 4739 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Make sure you are in sRGB mode and i personally would prefer to have the white balance on AUTO


On a wing and a prayer
User currently offlineFlyingZacko From Germany, joined May 2005, 583 posts, RR: 6
Reply 17, posted (9 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 4735 times:

Quoting Dvmpaunch (Reply 14):
I have a question. What internal settings do you guys use? ie: saturation colour etc. I think I've mastered the f8.0 factor but I always have to do a lot of photoshop to get the colours just right on the 300D.

I do the same thing though. I usually use photoshop too, if the colors aren't the way I want them to be, but I never change any of the camera settings for that concerning saturation or colour.

Cheers,

Sebastian



Canon 40D + 24-70 f/2.8 L + 70-200 f/4 L + Speedlite 430EX
User currently offlineDC10Tim From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2005, 1406 posts, RR: 14
Reply 18, posted (9 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 4726 times:

Quoting QantasA332 (Reply 15):
Again, I'm not a 300D user, however I believe the neutral parameter on the 300D is Parameter 2.

This is one of the other quirks of the 300D I have found. 'Parameter1' sets everything to +1, wheras 'Parameter2' puts everything to 0. I always shoot in 'Parameter2' as I found the "in camera" sharpening applied by 'Parameter1' to leave you with too many jaggies on resizing. 'Parameter2' still can do to an extent, but it's not half as bad.

Tim.



Obviously missing something....
User currently offlineEGFF From UK - Wales, joined Sep 2001, 2201 posts, RR: 12
Reply 19, posted (9 years 1 month 2 weeks 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 4670 times:

I'm taking in everything that everyone is saying, i've had more time now to use the camera, i've been out in the garden trying all kinds of different settings and i think now i know roughly the basics to get some nice shots.
Obviously it will take time as there is so much to learn, as time goes on i'll get better and better, i'm still chuffed to have made the switch to DSLR as i have been using a Sony F707 for the past 3yrs.
If anybody has anymore info or feedback please post, the more feedback i can get the quicker i'll learn.
Regards,
Shaun



All together or not at all
User currently offlineJkw777 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 20, posted (9 years 1 month 2 weeks 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 4666 times:

The key to learning is to practice practice practice.

Keep at it, keep experimenting. If you do need more help, you know there are plenty of people here that can help you.

Good luck,
Justin  Smile


User currently offlineEGFF From UK - Wales, joined Sep 2001, 2201 posts, RR: 12
Reply 21, posted (9 years 1 month 2 weeks 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 4662 times:

Thanks for your kind words and a helping hand Justin, it's very much appreciated ... i just gotta wait now to put it to the test (which isn't gonna be for another week or so, boo hoo)
I suppose the longer i wait the better it's gonna be when i do finally get to the airport and let loose :P
Regards,
Shaun



All together or not at all
User currently offlineA388 From Netherlands Antilles, joined May 2001, 9720 posts, RR: 11
Reply 22, posted (9 years 1 month 2 weeks 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 4646 times:

Wow, this type of feedback I was also looking for. Even though I've had my EOS300D for quite some time now, I'm still learning from this forum. Like EGFF has said, thank you very much for the tips. It just happens to be that I will go to the airport tomorrow so I will also take into account the tips I've read here Big grin

Cheers,

A388


User currently offlineA388 From Netherlands Antilles, joined May 2001, 9720 posts, RR: 11
Reply 23, posted (9 years 1 month 2 weeks 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 4638 times:

I forgot to ask this, do the f8.0-f11 Av settings also apply for arriving/departing aircraft (in other words fast moving objects) or is it better to use the Tv settings in this case? I did that a few times but the images came out blurry with lower quality.

A388


User currently offlineFlyingZacko From Germany, joined May 2005, 583 posts, RR: 6
Reply 24, posted (9 years 1 month 2 weeks 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 4625 times:

Quoting A388 (Reply 23):
I forgot to ask this, do the f8.0-f11 Av settings also apply for arriving/departing aircraft (in other words fast moving objects) or is it better to use the Tv settings in this case? I did that a few times but the images came out blurry with lower quality.

You rather wanna go for the Av setting there instead of the Tv setting if not even P.

Cheers,
Sebastian



Canon 40D + 24-70 f/2.8 L + 70-200 f/4 L + Speedlite 430EX
25 JeffM : You can leave it on AV, open it up some (f stop) to increase your shutter speed, or bump your iso up to 200 if your still having problems with blur.
26 Sean377 : It's already been said, but sticking with a default f8 in AV mode will help towards catching the sharpest possible images, as this value tends to be
27 IwantaBBJ : Re. the shutter speeds: We have talked about getting adequate shutter speeds.... But what is adequate and what not? I remember of hearing a rule of th
28 Staffan : It depends, the rule of thumb says 1/focal length as the limit to what's hand holdable and what's not. If you have shaky hands you might want to have
29 FlyingZacko : See, that's why I love A.net! There are so many people here that all care about the same stuff and everyone knows some information that the others don
30 Post contains images JeffM : Staffan, it's not necessary to include the crop factor to the "old rule" since you are not adding any real focal length, just using less of the image
31 FlyingZacko : JeffM, very true what you said about sharp photos being the result of good technique. Do you have experience shooting with focal lengths above 300mm w
32 JeffM : Yes, but I've been taking pictures of airplanes since the late 70's. I've got a lot of practice. I can't give you an exact setting...that is the poin
33 Psych : That's an important point Jeff - there often seems to be a lot of confusion relating to this particular issue. I think the above 'rule of thumb' is a
34 Post contains links Jan Mogren : Crop factor should be included. Some of that interesting stuff at the end of this thread RE: Sigma 50-500 Why No OS? (by Staffan May 4 2005 in Aviatio
35 JeffM : Good points Paul. That is the reason I have switched to using a hand held incident meter. It measures light falling on the entire scene, not just the
36 JeffM : I disagree, but if you need to include it, by all means do. Many don't use that "rule of thumb" anyway, but I can see where it might be a helpful gui
37 Sean377 : I was led to believe that IS was to eliminate hand shake in low light conditions on a still, rather than moving subject, and was not designed for mov
38 JeffM : No, Mode II is is designed for moving objects. It allows movement horizontally and surpresses vertical movement, it does not eliminate it. Mode I sur
39 Jan Mogren : Jeff, you are ex military no? You thought of my example with that laser thingy? /JM
40 Sean377 : Ah, I see, is this Mode II specific to certain lenses, or is that now standard on all IS lenses? Sean
41 JeffM : Jan, are you talking about this? There would be many variables that could effect this, and the one we are talking about (shutter speed) isn't one of t
42 Post contains images Jan Mogren : That is the one Jeff. Let's not call it a "have to rule". You agree we will see the shake better at 1km. Should be the same as shooting with a higher
43 Post contains images Staffan : Here we go again That's right. Imagine using a 300 mm lens on a full frame. Now imagine shooting the same lens with a 1.6 crop, in which of these case
44 JeffM : Neither, it is the same. You're just not seeing the rest of the frame. Focal length has everything to do with it. It is pure physics. You are moving
45 Staffan : Let me rephrase: Imagine using a 300 mm lens on a full frame. Now imagine shooting the same lens with a 1.6 crop, in which of these cases will the sam
46 Post contains images JeffM : No, let me..... Actual movement is EXACTLY the same, Apparent movement based on looking at a smaller part of that image has no effect. Done with this
47 Staffan : The main difference between different focal lengths is the crop. Staffan
48 Highguy76 : Has anyone experimented with different White Balance settings? I usually use AWB, but have had some good results usuing the shade setting, especially
49 Jan Mogren : Funny thing is that we agree on "Actual movement is EXACTLY the same" but not the "Apparent movement based on looking at a smaller part of that image
50 Post contains images Psych : I am very interested in this debate about the crop factor. I have to say my understanding is just as Jeff has described it above. In a previous thread
51 Thunderbird1 : So when you guys use the "Large" filesize setting, how do you scale down? Simply using a 50% resize? I've gotten some bad results in the past using a
52 JohnP : I resize using Photoshop Elements and have always had good luck. Different programs will undoubtedly use different algorithms for the resize which can
53 JeffM : 300mm is 300mm any way you look at it. It is not going to move any more with a small sensor, or a larger sensor behind it. The only thing that can ma
54 JumboJim747 : This crop factor is making me very confused. Please can someone shed some light on it for me as im not the worlds brightest person. Say for example i
55 Post contains links and images JeffM : Jim, What you see in the viewfinder is normally about 97% or so of the entire image, regardless if it is film or digital. The crop factor is this... A
56 Psych : I am really pleased to see such an intellectually 'rigorous' debate here - congratulations to all concerned. Particular thanks from me to JeffM and Jo
57 Sean377 : Jim, that's a great post, should make it a lot clearer to most people. One thing I'm now a little baffled about - a 70-200mm on my 20D is said to be 1
58 Staffan : The actual movement on the sensor will be the same, but as I wrote in the other thread this is only relevant if you print all your photos 1.6 times sm
59 Post contains images Staffan : The whole 1/focal length rule is not a physical law on when motion blur appears but merely a guide to where average joe should start to worry about bl
60 JumboJim747 : JeffM That is the best description i could have asked for to answer my question. I thank you very much for taking the time and effort to explain this
61 Post contains images A388 : This thread/post is indeed very handy even though I sometimes have difficulty with understanding/following the conversations when more technical terms
62 FlyingZacko : That is exactly right. When in Av mode you set the Aperture and the camera sets the shutter speed accordingly and vice versa when shooting in Tv. If
63 A388 : I see now, thanks FlyingZacko. I will go to Schiphol tomorrow near the runway to practice. I would have to be very quick when photographing a departin
64 Post contains images EGFF : A388, i would say using the AV mode is the much better option, you'll have your aperture of f8.0 and with the fast moving aircraft your shutter speed
65 Sean377 : Manual mode (in my opinion) is for creating artistic shots, where time is not a problem. Put your camera in manual mode when shooting moving aircraft
66 Fleitao : Hi A388, You can. Assuming it's a 300D you have, you just have to press the AV+- button on the back of your camera and while holding it turn the dial
Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
Canon 300D Settings posted Wed Apr 7 2004 06:37:50 by Mx330
Canon Parameter Settings posted Sat Aug 5 2006 20:03:02 by F4phantom
Canon 300D Interest? posted Wed Apr 19 2006 19:01:41 by Miamiair
Cannon 300d Settings posted Sun Feb 5 2006 00:13:20 by United905
Canon 300D (Rebel) - Parameters posted Mon Jan 16 2006 23:05:38 by Mhodgson
Broken Canon 300D Sub-Mirror Spring posted Thu Oct 20 2005 23:12:09 by DLX737200
Canon 300D posted Sat Feb 19 2005 13:33:44 by United905
Canon 300D...or What's Better For The Price? posted Tue Dec 28 2004 11:38:25 by Andz
Canon 300D + Sigma 50-500 APO ...experience!? posted Mon Dec 27 2004 14:27:50 by Wernair
Help With Canon 300D And Photoshop Elements posted Sat Nov 27 2004 17:45:57 by Simon Cooper