Sponsor Message:
Aviation Photography Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Broken Olympus OM-20  
User currently offlineBeowulf From Singapore, joined Jul 2003, 734 posts, RR: 14
Posted (8 years 10 months 3 weeks 6 days ago) and read 2929 times:

Hello,

I am asking for some advice what to do about a camera of mine. With my SLR cameras I have not gone digital and do not plan to do so any time soon. A few years ago, I bought a used Olympus OM-20 while being in France on a semester-abroad program because I had traded one of my planned courses for a photography course and thus didn't have a proper camera with me. When I use color negative film, one doesn't see any problems because the printing machines in the stores adjust a photographer's mistake. However, when I use b/w negative film, where I do the prints myself, or color positive film, it becomes evident that the pictures are all overexposed. Since I have an OM-2, as well, and the OM-20 was just a quick and cheap buy (now I know why  grumpy  ), I haven't cared a lot about this issue. Then a few months ago, I found a small, but long established, camera repair shop and brought my OM-20 there to have it checked. The guy told me that the electronic device which measures the light is broken and cannot be repaired since Olympus doesn't have any spare parts left.

Overall, I am not shedding tears over the camera, but I wonder what I shall do with it now. I thought of selling it on eBay, mentioning that it had this defect. Any suggestions or ideas?

Nick

7 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineViv From Ireland, joined May 2005, 3142 posts, RR: 28
Reply 1, posted (8 years 10 months 3 weeks 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 2920 times:

Why not use manual settings, and deliberately under-expose each shot in relation to the settings selected by the camera?


Nikon D700, Nikkor 80-400, Fuji X Pro 1, Fujinon 35 f/1.4, Fujinon 18 f/2
User currently offlineBeowulf From Singapore, joined Jul 2003, 734 posts, RR: 14
Reply 2, posted (8 years 10 months 3 weeks 5 days 19 hours ago) and read 2913 times:

Quoting Viv (Reply 1):
Why not use manual settings, and deliberately under-expose each shot in relation to the settings selected by the camera?

Good suggestion, but how do I find out by how much I need to underexpose?

Nick


User currently offlineViv From Ireland, joined May 2005, 3142 posts, RR: 28
Reply 3, posted (8 years 10 months 3 weeks 5 days 19 hours ago) and read 2912 times:

By trial and error. Start with one stop, and go up and down from there. It will cost you, say, 10 shots of film.

Once you have found the right correction, it should be the same for all shots.



Nikon D700, Nikkor 80-400, Fuji X Pro 1, Fujinon 35 f/1.4, Fujinon 18 f/2
User currently offlineDLKAPA From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (8 years 10 months 3 weeks 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 2897 times:

If you're shooting black and white and developing it yourself are you sure you aren't processing it incorrectly?

User currently offlineBeowulf From Singapore, joined Jul 2003, 734 posts, RR: 14
Reply 5, posted (8 years 10 months 3 weeks 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 2876 times:

Quoting DLKAPA (Reply 4):
If you're shooting black and white and developing it yourself are you sure you aren't processing it incorrectly?

Yes, because the color positive film shows the same symptoms and I don't process that myself. Moreover, as you I wrote, I had the camera in for a "service."

Nick

[Edited 2005-12-03 09:15:56]

User currently offlineBeowulf From Singapore, joined Jul 2003, 734 posts, RR: 14
Reply 6, posted (8 years 10 months 3 weeks 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 2871 times:

Quoting Viv (Reply 3):
By trial and error. Start with one stop, and go up and down from there. It will cost you, say, 10 shots of film.

Ah, o.k., like bracketing. How is work with an external light meter? I have never had one, thus my question.

Nick


User currently offlineViv From Ireland, joined May 2005, 3142 posts, RR: 28
Reply 7, posted (8 years 10 months 3 weeks 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 2866 times:

Quoting Beowulf (Reply 6):
How is work with an external light meter?

You don't need one. Here's what you do:

Set aperture priority on the camera. Set your chosen aperture (say f8). Look at what shutter speed the camera gives you. Increase that speed by one stop. If photos are still over-exposed, increase speed by half a stop. Or, if photos are under-exposed, reduce speed by half a stop.

If you use shutter priority, the same procedure applies, just increase or decrease the aperture while keeping the same shutter speed. Remember, one stop of aperture equals one stop of shutter speed.

You may need to do this a few times, varying the exposure compensation by one or two stops up or down, until you get it right.

Once you get it right, apply that amount of exposure compensation to all your photos.



Nikon D700, Nikkor 80-400, Fuji X Pro 1, Fujinon 35 f/1.4, Fujinon 18 f/2
Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
Olympus OM-40 posted Thu Jul 27 2000 03:07:45 by Shamrock77
Canon EOS300D Broken CCD, Costs? posted Thu Nov 30 2006 03:42:18 by A388
Anyone In PHL Taking Pics Today (8/20)? posted Mon Aug 21 2006 01:32:05 by UAL Bagsmasher
Canon EOS350D Or Olympus E-500 posted Mon Jul 31 2006 10:22:43 by GeorgL
Please Help! I Think My Camera Is Broken! posted Fri Jun 2 2006 15:16:45 by AirKas1
Olympus Evolt E-500 Memory Question posted Tue Feb 21 2006 05:17:05 by Indy
Olympus XD M256 Card Problem posted Sun Jan 8 2006 11:24:22 by Apollo13
Olympus E-500 posted Fri Dec 16 2005 01:22:54 by ANITIX87
Sigma 10-20, Anyone Using It? posted Thu Dec 8 2005 04:05:57 by Clickhappy
LHR 20/11/2005 posted Sat Nov 19 2005 10:24:50 by Cosec59