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Sorry....Polariser Again!  
User currently offlineGranite From UK - Scotland, joined May 1999, 5577 posts, RR: 63
Posted (14 years 4 months 1 week 4 days 14 hours ago) and read 1021 times:
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Hi all

I'm off to LHR next weekend and planning to take my polariser with me......hopefully the weather will be sunny.

I am pretty dumb, polariser wise.

Can anyone tell me, if I want the sky to be more blue, do I turn the polariser so it looks blue or does it go the other way?

It's a circular one I have.

Any help for a dumbo would be appreciated  

Regards
Gary Watt
Aberdeen, Scotland


14 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineCkw From UK - England, joined Aug 2010, 767 posts, RR: 16
Reply 1, posted (14 years 4 months 1 week 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 921 times:

Well basically what happens is that the polarizer cuts reflected light and glare - it won't make the sky more "blue" but will increase the contrast between sky and cloud - which perceptually I guess amounts to the same thing!

What you see thru the lens is what you get ... BUT the effectiveness of the polarizer depends on your position in relation to the prevailing light - ideally I think you want to be at 90 degrees to the sun for maximum effect - shots with the sun directly behind will benefit less. Also, be careful if the front of your lens rotates while focusing, as this changes the orientation of the filter. There is generally one position where the effect is very marked, but even a slight divergence reduces the effect considerably.

Cheers,

Colin



Colin K. Work, Pixstel
User currently offlineCityBird MD-11 From United States of America, joined Apr 2000, 31 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (14 years 4 months 1 week 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 914 times:

Hi, Gary

As Colin stated, what you see is what you get. You must be 90 degrees to the sun for maximum effect.

The biggest problem that I have is getting the lab to process these shots correctly. They seem to do a fine job with non-aviation related photos, but when you put an airplane in the shot, watch out  I've taken some gorgeous landscape and architecture shots with a circular polarizer, though. Just make sure to mention to your lab that this filter was used.

Happy shooting,
Norm


User currently offlineJasonm From Australia, joined May 2000, 238 posts, RR: 4
Reply 3, posted (14 years 4 months 1 week 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 903 times:

You might want to consider the 82A,B filter for warmer color temperatures..??

Cheers,
Jason
Adelaide, South Australia


User currently offlineAke0404AR From United States of America, joined May 2000, 2535 posts, RR: 45
Reply 4, posted (14 years 4 months 1 week 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 905 times:

Hello Gary,

here you can see two examples of you the polarizer can effect the pic.

with polarized filter

Click for large version
Click here for full size photo!

Photo © Vasco Garcia



without polarized filter

Click for large version
Click here for full size photo!

Photo © Vasco Garcia



I only use it when it's really sunny, as I takes a lot of light away when you shot at a cloudy day.
I like the saturated colors the filter can create, I took some really nice shots of Sailboats @ Boston Sail 2000.

When it comes to processing, I never had any problems with prints, but I had problems with slides.

I definitely would give it a shot. You will see the difference.

If you like I can e-mail you some examples, let me know.

Regards

Vasco



User currently offlineMirage From Portugal, joined May 1999, 3125 posts, RR: 14
Reply 5, posted (14 years 4 months 1 week 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 899 times:

Sorry to use your topic to make a question but as it is related with polarizing...well here it goes:

I have a Vivitar 55mm polariser that has given me catastrophic results on a Vivitar 70-210mm lens, I just couldn't focus the pictures. How do I know if it is a circular filter or not?

thanks
Luis, Faro, Portugal


User currently offlineChris28_17 From United States of America, joined Jul 2000, 1439 posts, RR: 10
Reply 6, posted (14 years 4 months 1 week 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 894 times:

Wow, ive had the same problem about 20% of the time with my polarizer... the auto focus seems to be clueless and the pics are just sckrewy; i have a canon EOS rebel S with a 35-80mm and a 75-300mm with IS and both have had focusing problems now and then with my polarizer...

thanks..

CHRIS


User currently offlineGranite From UK - Scotland, joined May 1999, 5577 posts, RR: 63
Reply 7, posted (14 years 4 months 1 week 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 888 times:
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Hi all

Thanks for all your help on the polariser.

If it works out OK for me you will see the results, if not, you won't  

Regards
Gary Watt
Aberdeen, Scotland


User currently offlineScotty From UK - Scotland, joined Dec 1999, 1875 posts, RR: 3
Reply 8, posted (14 years 4 months 1 week 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 887 times:

HI Gary

I have a circular polarizer on all my lenses all the time. The guys are right - what you see is what you get. But its most effective for landing/take off shot where you have blue sky background and the sun at an angle - less effective for shots on the ground.


User currently offlineCkw From UK - England, joined Aug 2010, 767 posts, RR: 16
Reply 9, posted (14 years 4 months 1 week 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 886 times:

I don't have the tech details to hand, but basically polarizers come in two forms - "linear" and "circular". The former type can totally confuse some types of autofocus systems and deceive some metering systems. The circular type gets round this problem - I'm not aware of anyway of checking which type you have once you've thrown away the box!

Cheers,

Colin



Colin K. Work, Pixstel
User currently offlineChris28_17 From United States of America, joined Jul 2000, 1439 posts, RR: 10
Reply 10, posted (14 years 4 months 1 week 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 883 times:

Colin your right, i just got back from my camera store and yes my particular problem was indeed caused by my linear polarizer.

A new circular polarizer is about $40 ... this is probably worth while to get althought my funds are not quite good enought yet...

problem solved? hopefully

CHRIS


User currently offlineGranite From UK - Scotland, joined May 1999, 5577 posts, RR: 63
Reply 11, posted (14 years 4 months 1 week 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 877 times:
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Hi all

Well, at LHR there is tons of things so if the polariser doesn't work on some shots, it won't be a big loss......unless there is no sun  

Regards
Gary Watt
Aberdeen, Scotland


User currently offlineCkw From UK - England, joined Aug 2010, 767 posts, RR: 16
Reply 12, posted (14 years 4 months 1 week 2 days 13 hours ago) and read 869 times:

Well Gary, since the British summer seems to be reverting to its usual form the whole thing is probably a bit academic! Seriously, I find using the polariser to be worthwhile when you've got clear blue skies, with perhaps a few white clouds ... haze etc. (rain!) render it pointless.

Cheers,

Colin



Colin K. Work, Pixstel
User currently offlineTomH From United States of America, joined May 1999, 960 posts, RR: 2
Reply 13, posted (14 years 4 months 1 week 14 hours ago) and read 861 times:

I've only used my polarizer a few times, though I have had it about 25 years. As previously mentioned, it really soaks up the light, perhaps by as much as 2 f-stops. A circular polarizer is basically two fine-mesh screens. The screen nearest the object lens is stationary, (if you have srewed it on tight enough!) while the screen closest to the subject can be rotated. My rotating screen has a mark on the barrel that enables me to quickly align it towards the sun for maximum filtration. When using the polarizer you are applying mechanical filtration to the incoming light in such a way that the reflected light (such as that coming from dust in the atmosphere, or from a canopy) is attenuated. I think this is because reflected light is not in the same phase orientation as the source light. Well, that's about as far out on this limb as I want to get. Oh, one more thing, the polarizer works very well with B&W film, giving you a nice dark sky and puffy clouds-which is all you normally have at LHR, right?

User currently offlineRindt From Germany, joined May 2000, 930 posts, RR: 13
Reply 14, posted (14 years 4 months 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 851 times:

Hey

I've had some bad results with a polarizer, but then again, I've only tried it with an "already-slow-lense". When you're shooting something with 80-100mm at F5.6 at 1/125th without a filter, adding a filter will cut the light by at least an F-stop. I think a filter is great with faster lenses especially when you're shooting a United Airlines plane... it seems to be hard to be able to read the white "United Airlnes" on slides of mine. Maybe it's a scanning problem, but I notice it on other's pictures too. A filter would probably make the titles more legible.

Regards,
Rob



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