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Do I Need A Filter?  
User currently offlineLukasMako From Austria, joined Feb 2006, 88 posts, RR: 1
Posted (8 years 8 months 1 week 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 3161 times:

Hi,

During my last spotting I as an amateur discovered that the pictures during strong sunshine and greater heat are pretty much worthless while in the evening the pictures are getting very good.

Here a sample of a typical picture at day:

http://www.airliners.net/addphotos/big/ready/DSC_0069-ANET-TEST.JPG

Was taken with a D50 and Nikkor AF-S DX 55-200mm (ED)

Now I checked everthing and its all set up correctly. THe same happens with each of my Nikkor lense.

I guy which I met during spotting told me to use a filter. Now what filter do I need ...

12 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineViv From Ireland, joined May 2005, 3142 posts, RR: 28
Reply 1, posted (8 years 8 months 1 week 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 3150 times:

Contrary to popular myth, there is no such thing as a filter that will eliminate the shimmer caused by heat haze.

Heat haze kills shots. There is no cure. Shoot in the early morning and late evening and avoid the heat of the day.



Nikon D700, Nikkor 80-400, Fuji X Pro 1, Fujinon 35 f/1.4, Fujinon 18 f/2
User currently offlineThierryD From Luxembourg, joined Dec 2005, 2081 posts, RR: 51
Reply 2, posted (8 years 8 months 1 week 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 3150 times:
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A filter won't help you in this case Lukas.
I know this spot in VIE pretty well out of my own experience since I stood there for about 3 hours one day and shot some 70 shots of which more than 50 were worthless for uploading due to the heat haze you get which radiates from the ground.
Though a filter might help you reduce the overbrightness on the airplane fuselage it will not be able to get rid of the heat haze and thus will not help you get A.net acceptable shots.
Best thing to do in VIE -where you rarely get near to the planes- during summer is either to only photogrpah planes while they're already/still in the air where you won't get any heat haze and/or photograph in the early morning and in the evening where heat haze also is not a problem anymore.

Thierry



"Go ahead...make my day"
User currently offlineLukasMako From Austria, joined Feb 2006, 88 posts, RR: 1
Reply 3, posted (8 years 8 months 1 week 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 3119 times:

Hi,

Thanks for your help,
The pictue was taken at temperatures just below 20°C. I ask myself how they look like at about 35°.

Whatever ... so what is a UV-filter good for. Should I use one generally. A few people already told me to get one.


User currently offlineThierryD From Luxembourg, joined Dec 2005, 2081 posts, RR: 51
Reply 4, posted (8 years 8 months 1 week 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 3113 times:
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Quoting LukasMako (Reply 3):
Whatever ... so what is a UV-filter good for

Check this out:

http://dpfwiw.com/filters.htm#uv

Thierry



"Go ahead...make my day"
User currently offlineViv From Ireland, joined May 2005, 3142 posts, RR: 28
Reply 5, posted (8 years 8 months 1 week 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 3112 times:

On a digital camera, good only for protecting the lens from scratches. Will have no effect on the image.


Nikon D700, Nikkor 80-400, Fuji X Pro 1, Fujinon 35 f/1.4, Fujinon 18 f/2
User currently offlineJeffM From United States of America, joined May 2005, 3266 posts, RR: 51
Reply 6, posted (8 years 8 months 1 week 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 3109 times:

Quoting LukasMako (Reply 3):
so what is a UV-filter good for

Well, aside from making your wallet lighter, nothing at all for digital cameras.

Quoting LukasMako (Thread starter):
Now I checked everthing and its all set up correctly.

What did you use to check?


User currently offlineLukasMako From Austria, joined Feb 2006, 88 posts, RR: 1
Reply 7, posted (8 years 8 months 1 week 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 3104 times:

Quote:
What did you use to check?

Ehm ... I mean cleaning the lens, setting up the autofokus into the correct mode, all these simple things.


User currently offlinePsych From United Kingdom, joined Nov 2004, 3064 posts, RR: 58
Reply 8, posted (8 years 8 months 1 week 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 3064 times:
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Guys - it is worth mentioning that although heat haze is at its worst in warm summer months, it can still be a problem at other times.

I rediscovered decades-old physics lessons recently, as I found on a chilly day at Manchester last week that horrible heat haze could still wreck my photos. The ambient air temperature doesn't have to be hot - I was in a woolly hat that day. My rudimentary understanding is that it is all about the relative densities of the air and the mixing that occurs as the warmer air rises. Enough warmth from the sun to generate a lot of radiated heat (by something good at that like black tarmac) going in to cold air will cause heat haze. What is good about the winter (or either end of the day) is that there is less solar energy to be radiated back upwards.

The differing densities of air mixing alters the physics of the light passing through, hence the 'wobbly' effect. No amount of technology on the end of your camera can affect that physics.

Paul


User currently offlineLukasMako From Austria, joined Feb 2006, 88 posts, RR: 1
Reply 9, posted (8 years 8 months 1 week 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 3043 times:

Hi

Quote:
Purple Fringing Artifact
To my knowledge, the only practical optical role for UV filters in digital photography relates not to scatter, but to an artifact known as "purple fringing" (PF). PF is most commonly seen in digital images but also occurs in film images. It typically appears as a multipixel band of bright purple surrounding the peripheral edges of dark objects cast against a bright background. Central edges are spared. Backlit leaves set against a bright sky are a common PF scenario. A widely accepted theory of purple fringing has yet to emerge, but it's most likely a high-order lens aberration akin to but different from run of the mill chromatic aberration, which instead produces soft red and green fringes on opposite sides of affected objects.

Actually I am also realizing this problem. When opening the aperture higher than 6.3 it always happens. Sometimes even with 7.1.
Any Help you can give me with that problem


User currently offlineDC10Tim From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2005, 1406 posts, RR: 14
Reply 10, posted (8 years 8 months 1 week 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 3005 times:

What I don't understand is why heat-haze isn't visible to the naked eye unless it's really bad. It just doesn't seem to make sense.

Tim.



Obviously missing something....
User currently offlineJeffM From United States of America, joined May 2005, 3266 posts, RR: 51
Reply 11, posted (8 years 8 months 1 week 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 2998 times:

Quoting DC10Tim (Reply 10):
What I don't understand is why heat-haze isn't visible to the naked eye unless it's really bad. It just doesn't seem to make sense.

You can see it if you look hard enough. But, it's moving (rising hot air) and is much easier to see when frozen in time.


User currently offlineD L X From United States of America, joined May 1999, 11569 posts, RR: 52
Reply 12, posted (8 years 8 months 1 week 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 2997 times:

Quoting LukasMako (Reply 3):
The pictue was taken at temperatures just below 20°C.

This picture was shot when the temperature was about -15*C.

http://i39.photobucket.com/albums/e199/D_L_X/DTW%20Feb18/Heat_Hazed_DSC_0018.jpg

Heat haze strikes whenever there is temperature differential... not just when there is heat.



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