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STS-115 Photography  
User currently offlineEksath From United States of America, joined Aug 2004, 1295 posts, RR: 25
Posted (7 years 11 months 1 week 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 2990 times:
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ARTICLE EDITOR

We are looking go to go for sunday or monday or ... Smile. I know some folks are trying to "catch" the launch. Here is some relevant NASA status reports for those people which can help plan ahead. Good luck!  Smile

-----------------------STATUS REPORT: S-082206 ----------------------
NASA'S SPACE SHUTTLE PROCESSING STATUS REPORT

Mission: STS-115 - 19th International Space Station Flight (12A) -
P3/P4 Truss Segment and Solar Arrays
Vehicle: Atlantis (OV-104)
Location: Launch Pad 39B
Launch Date: Aug. 27, 2006, 4:30 p.m. EDT
Crew: Jett, Ferguson, Tanner, Burbank, MacLean and Stefanyshyn-Piper
Inclination/Orbit Altitude: 51.6 degrees/122 nautical miles

At Launch Pad 39B, closeout of the orbiter's aft compartments
continues, and pressurization of the orbiter's maneuvering system,
reaction control system and main propulsion system is under way.
Stowage of flight crew equipment in the crew module is ongoing.
Payload bay preparations will resume Wednesday. Final closeouts on
the solid rocket boosters and the external fuel tank will be
completed today.

In Houston, the STS-115 crew is conducting the final ascent simulation
today. The crew will arrive at Kennedy Space Center on Thursday.

-------------------RELEASE: 53-06--------------------------------------

AIRSPACE, BRIDGES AND WATERWAY RESTRICTIONS IN EFFECT FOR STS-115

For the STS-115 launch of Space Shuttle Atlantis, NASA managers are
urging all aircraft pilots and boaters to fully comply with the
airspace, bridges and waterway restrictions imposed around Kennedy
Space Center prior to and during shuttle launches and landings.

"As always, we are coordinating with officials from the U.S. Air Force
Eastern Range, Federal Aviation Administration and the U.S. Coast
Guard to help provide a safe launch environment for the shuttle crew
and for interested spectators," said KSC Launch Director Mike
Leinbach. "Violating these restrictions is not only unsafe for the
astronauts and support crews, it's unsafe for the violator."

The first launch opportunity is Sunday, Aug. 27, with liftoff targeted
for 4:30 p.m. EDT. This launch time is approximately in the middle of
a 10-minute launch window. At NASA's request, Air Force and Coast
Guard surveillance aircraft will patrol KSC's airspace boundaries on
launch day. Violators will be intercepted by patrol forces,
thoroughly investigated and subject to FAA enforcement action. A
number of restrictions remain in effect around KSC during the hours
immediately following the launch of a space shuttle.

The following are restrictions that apply to pilots, boaters and motor
vehicle operators using the airspace, waterways, or roads and bridges
that lead to KSC.

KSC AREA AVIATION RESTRICTIONS

For the launch of Atlantis on mission STS-115, all restricted areas
surrounding KSC will be active and the area covered by flight
restrictions has once again been expanded for this launch. The length
of time the restrictions will be in effect prior to launch has also
been extended.

Due to international terrorist activities, heightened security is
essential to protect the space shuttle as a national asset. An
inadvertent unauthorized incursion into the area of the Cape
Canaveral Temporary Flight Restriction (TFR) could cause a scrub in
the launch of Atlantis, the activation of airspace defenses and an
FAA enforcement action. Local pilots are asked to help NASA by
respecting these temporary but necessary restrictions so the launch
can occur on time and without incident.

The Eastern Range restricted airspace for KSC and Cape Canaveral Air
Force Station is in effect on a continuous basis and is off limits to
general aviation pilots. Access is limited to official aircraft only.
The restricted airspace normally covers the area bounded by the
Indian River to the west, Port Canaveral to the south, the city of
Oak Hill to the north, and three miles over the Atlantic Ocean to the
east.

On launch day, these restricted areas will be expanded by the TFR and
will be activated at approximately launch minus 7 hours. It will
continue in effect until approximately 20 minutes after launch, after
which the standard restricted areas for KSC and Cape Canaveral Air
Force Station will be in effect. On Aug. 27, the TFR will be
activated at 9:24 a.m. EDT. The launch is targeted to occur at 4:30
p.m. EDT. Should the launch be scrubbed during the terminal
countdown, the TFR will remain in effect until 5:54 p.m. For the next
launch attempt, pilots should check NOTAMS for the hours the TFR will
be in effect.

General aviation and VFR operations are prohibited within a
30-nautical-mile radius of Launch Pad 39-B from the surface to (but
not including) 18,000 feet (located on the Melbourne VOR/DME
004-degree radial at 30.6 nautical miles). Among the public-use
general aviation airports affected within this area are Space Coast
Regional Airport in Titusville, Arthur Dunn Airpark in Titusville,
Merritt Island Airport on Merritt Island and Massey Ranch in
Edgewater.

Within an airspace radius between 30 and 40 nautical miles of Pad
39-B, a discrete transponder code must be obtained and clearance
granted from air traffic control before entering this airspace.
Continuous radio communications must be maintained.

Before flight, pilots should contact the St. Petersburg FAA Flight
Service Station at 1-800/WxBrief (1-800/992-7433) for details of the
restrictions contained in the NOTAMS. In flight, outside Orlando
Class B airspace, pilots should contact Orlando Approach control on
134.95. In the Melbourne area, contact Orlando Approach control on
132.65. In the New Smyrna Beach area, contact Orlando Approach
control on 125.35. Flight Service can also be reached locally by
radio on the Titusville RCO at 123.6 or the Melbourne RCO on 122.6.
Advisories will also be available from the control tower at Space
Coast Regional Airport in Titusville at 118.9 megahertz.

Among the public-use airports affected within the 30- to
40-nautical-mile radius in which flight is permitted but under
positive air traffic control are Orlando International Airport,
Orlando Executive Airport, Orlando-Sanford International Airport, the
New Smyrna Beach Municipal Airport, Melbourne International Airport
and Valkaria airport. Pilots are encouraged to consult the most
recent FAA aeronautical chart for Orlando Class B airspace dated Feb.
16.

BRIDGES AND ACCESS HIGHWAYS CONTROLLED FOR LAUNCH

The opening and closing of bridges over waterways surrounding KSC will
be strictly controlled during the hours immediately before and after
the launch period for each space shuttle mission.

Bridges affected by the launch include:

* Port Canaveral Barge Canal (State Road 401);

* Indian River/NASA Causeway West (Intracoastal Waterway);

* Merritt Island Barge Canal (Merritt Island State Road 3);

* Haulover Canal Bridge (State Road 3, north of KSC).

Restraints on bridge openings for boat traffic begin three hours
before launch. The bridges may be opened for five minutes at the
following points in the launch countdown: T-180 minutes, T-150
minutes, T-120 minutes, T-90 minutes and T-65 minutes. Adding 20
minutes to these times and subtracting that amount from the opening
of the launch window (4:24 p.m.) will result in an approximate time
of openings.

Bridges will remain closed to boat traffic until 90 minutes after
liftoff (T+90). They may then open for five minutes at T+90, T+120
minutes and T+150 minutes. Bridge operations will return to normal
three hours after launch (T+180 minutes).

Should the shuttle be required to perform a return-to-launch-site
landing at KSC, all bridges would remain closed to boat traffic from
45 minutes before landing until at least one hour after landing.

State Road 3 from the Gate 2 Pass and Identification Building to State
Road 405 (NASA Causeway) via Space Commerce Way will be closed on
launch day, Aug. 27, beginning at 8:30 a.m. NASA Causeway between the
KSC Visitor Complex and the U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame will also be
closed starting at that time. Only badged employees and guests with
passes will be permitted access. These roads will reopen
approximately two hours after launch.

On the Merritt Island Wildlife Refuge, State Road 406 and County Road
402 leading to Titusville, as well as State Road 3 south of the
Haulover Canal bridge, will close at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, Aug. 23,
and reopen approximately two hours after launch.

KSC AREA BOATING RESTRICTIONS

Waterways and boating near KSC will be strictly controlled prior to
and during the launch of Atlantis on STS-115.

Safety and security requirements, including Air Force range safety
impact limit lines, will go into effect as early as three days before
launch. Other requirements will be phased into effect through sunset
the night before launch. A general description of the area follows:

ATLANTIC OCEAN: Beginning on L-3 days (Thursday, Aug. 24, at 8 a.m.)
and continuing through launch, a general exclusion zone will be in
effect three miles offshore from the Haulover Canal, near the north
end of KSC, and southward to Port Canaveral. Four hours prior to
launch, all ocean-going traffic will be restricted from entering an
area measured from nine miles north and south of the launch pad and
extending 64 miles east into the ocean. An additional three-mile-wide
exclusion zone will be extended eastward along the flight path of the
space shuttle.

INDIAN RIVER: Restrictions apply from the NASA Causeway north to the
Haulover Canal and east of the Indian River's main channel.
Restrictions begin on L-3 days (Aug. 24).

MOSQUITO LAGOON: This area south of the Haulover Canal in the Mosquito
Lagoon is off limits to all boats beginning the day before launch
(L-1 day).

BANANA RIVER: Security limits begin at the Banana River Barge Canal
south of KSC at the State Road 528 crossing and extend north. This
restriction is effective 16 hours prior to launch.

All boating restrictions will be lifted approximately one hour after
launch.

Boating interests should monitor Coast Guard Channel 16 broadcasting
from Port Canaveral. The Coast Guard, the Fish and Wildlife Service,
and KSC security forces share responsibility for enforcing the
boating guidelines.


World Wide Aerospace Photography
48 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineJumboJim747 From Australia, joined Oct 2004, 2464 posts, RR: 44
Reply 1, posted (7 years 11 months 1 week 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 2972 times:
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Great information Suresh cheers.
I was always interested in shuttle launches but never understood why it takes so long to get the show back on the road when a launch gets cancelled if you can assist in this quick question it would be appreciated.
Cheers



On a wing and a prayer
User currently offlineJkw777 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (7 years 11 months 1 week 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 2959 times:

Excellent news, I look forward to seeing some pictures from this one! I'm a quiet lover of Space Travel, it amazes me everytime! I'll never forget my STS-77 launch in 1996!  Smile

Cheers,
Justin  Smile


User currently offlineDazed767 From United States of America, joined May 1999, 5490 posts, RR: 51
Reply 3, posted (7 years 11 months 1 week 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 2948 times:

I'm hoping to make it out as well, lived here all my live and haven't gone to the coast for a launch!  sigh 

User currently offlineEksath From United States of America, joined Aug 2004, 1295 posts, RR: 25
Reply 4, posted (7 years 11 months 1 week 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 2948 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
ARTICLE EDITOR

Quoting JumboJim747 (Reply 1):
Great information Suresh cheers.
I was always interested in shuttle launches but never understood why it takes so long to get the show back on the road when a launch gets cancelled if you can assist in this quick question it would be appreciated.
Cheers

Glad this stuff helps.

To answer your question, it depends principally on the reason for the scrub. Sometimes it is simple issues otherwise it can take weeks i.e. fuel sensor issue on ST-114 last year.

Once a non technical scrub happens (e.g. weather- the launch criteria is pretty strict for lightning,clouds etc in the approx. 30 miles radius, or an errant boater in the safety zone, errant GA pilot etc). The next launch window comes into play. Could be the next day or anything after. The fuel tank needs to be drained and refueled. Sometimes a half de-tanking happens. But there a series of safety proceedures that kick on all systems. If any one of these is out of spec, then the techical and flight team need to evaluate and overide or fix it.

Also, launches can be very work intensive in terms of support staff. Back up landing sites in Spain and North Africa have to staffed and the weather needs to be good there. If the Orbiter can't make orbit and she is beyond returning to KSC, she will land in Spain or North Africa (i think it is Morocco (sp?))

So a lot of things come into play. A proceedure of 3 days ON with a stand down day followed by another 2 day ON sequence kicks in if a sequential window of multiple days exists (i.e. 2 weeks of consecutive launch windows)
Some of this has to do with making sure support staff get rest. Flying the shuttle calls upon alot of work which involves 24 hour work by the staff.

Hope this makes sense.



World Wide Aerospace Photography
User currently offlineJumboJim747 From Australia, joined Oct 2004, 2464 posts, RR: 44
Reply 5, posted (7 years 11 months 1 week 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 2940 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting Eksath (Reply 4):
Hope this makes sense.

Are you kidding me ?
That makes a hell of a lot of seance and i really appreciate you taking the time for such a detailed response to my question.
I really appreciate it thank you.



On a wing and a prayer
User currently offlinePsyops From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (7 years 11 months 1 week 4 days 14 hours ago) and read 2882 times:

I myself am looking forward to seeing some typically killer shots, especially from the new 600mm monster

Pete


User currently offlineEksath From United States of America, joined Aug 2004, 1295 posts, RR: 25
Reply 7, posted (7 years 11 months 1 week 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 2859 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
ARTICLE EDITOR

Guys...

THE COUNTDOWN HAS STARTED!  Smile

Here is the official sequence of events. Hope this helps.



COUNTDOWN MILESTONES
*all times are Eastern

Launch-3 Days (Thursday, Aug. 24)

Prepare for the start of the STS-115 launch countdown
Perform the call to stations (11:30 a.m.)
Countdown begins at the T-43 hour mark (noon)
Begin final vehicle and facility closeouts for launch
Check out backup flight systems
Review flight software stored in mass memory units and display systems

Load backup flight system software into Atlantis' general purpose
computers
Remove flight-deck platforms (8:30 p.m.)
Complete preparation to load power reactant storage and distribution
system (11 p.m.)

Launch-2 Days (Friday, Aug. 25)

Activate and test navigational systems (1 a.m.)
Flight deck preliminary inspections complete (4 a.m.)

Enter first built-in hold at T-27 hours for duration of 4 hours (4
a.m.)

Clear launch pad of all non-essential personnel
Perform test of the vehicle's pyrotechnic initiator controllers

Resume countdown (8 a.m.)

Begin operations to load cryogenic reactants into Atlantis' fuel cell
storage tanks (8 a.m.)

Enter 10-hour built-in hold at T-19 hours (4 p.m.)

Demate orbiter mid-body umbilical unit (4:30 p.m.)
Resume orbiter and ground support equipment closeouts

Launch-1 Day (Saturday, Aug. 26)

Resume countdown (2 a.m.)

Final preparations of the shuttle's three main engines for main
propellant tanking (2 a.m.)
Begin filling pad sound suppression system water tank (4 a.m.)
Pad sound suppression system water tank filling complete (7 a.m.)
Close out the tail service masts on the mobile launcher platform
Begin star tracker functional checks (9:50 a.m.)

Enter planned hold at T-11 hours for 13 hours, 34 minutes (10 a.m.)

Activate orbiter's inertial measurement units
Activate the orbiter's communications systems
Install film in numerous cameras on the launch pad (10:55 a.m.)
Flight crew equipment late stow (3:10 p.m.)
Move Rotating Service Structure to the park position (7 p.m.)
Perform ascent switch list
Fuel cell flow-through purge complete

Resume countdown at T-11 hours (11:34 p.m.)

Launch Day (Sunday, Aug. 27)

Activate the orbiter's fuel cells (12:45 a.m.)
Clear the blast danger area of all non-essential personnel
Switch Atlantis' purge air to gaseous nitrogen (1:20 a.m.)

Enter planned 2-hour built-in hold at the T-6 hour mark (4:34 a.m.)

Launch team verifies no violations of launch commit criteria prior to
cryogenic loading of the external tank
Clear pad of all personnel

Resume countdown (6:34 a.m.)

Chilldown of propellant transfer lines (6:34 a.m.)
Begin loading the external tank with about 500,000 gallons of
cryogenic propellants (about 6:44 a.m.)
Complete filling the external tank with its flight load of liquid
hydrogen and liquid oxygen propellants (about 9:34 a.m.)
Final Inspection Team proceeds to launch pad

Enter planned 3-hour built-in hold at T-3 hours (9:34 a.m.)

Perform inertial measurement unit preflight calibration
Align Merritt Island Launch Area tracking antennas
Perform open loop test with Eastern Range

Resume countdown at T-3 hours (12:34 p.m.)

Crew departs Operations and Checkout Building for the pad (12:40 p.m.)

Complete closeout preparations in the White Room
Check cockpit switch configurations
Flight crew begins entry into the orbiter (about 1:10 p.m.)
Astronauts perform air-to-ground voice checks with Launch and Mission
Control
Begin to close Atlantis' crew hatch (about 2 p.m.)
Begin Eastern Range final network open loop command checks
Perform hatch seal and cabin leak checks
Complete White Room closeout
Closeout crew moves to fallback area
Primary ascent guidance data is transferred to the backup flight
system

Enter planned 10-minute hold at T-20 minutes (3:14 p.m.)

NASA test director conducts final launch team briefings
Complete inertial measurement unit preflight alignments

Resume countdown at T-20 minutes (3:24 p.m.)

Transition the orbiter's onboard computers to launch configuration
Start fuel cell thermal conditioning
Close orbiter cabin vent valves
Transition backup flight system to launch configuration

Enter estimated 40-minute hold at T-9 minutes (3:35 p.m.)

Launch director, Mission Management Team and NASA test director
conduct final polls for "go/no go" to launch

Resume countdown at T-9 minutes (about 4:21 p.m.)

Start automatic ground launch sequencer (T-9 minutes)
Retract orbiter crew access arm (T-7:30)
Start mission recorders (T-6:15)
Start Auxiliary Power Units (T-5)
Arm solid rocket booster and external tank range safety safe and arm
devices (T-5)
Start liquid oxygen drainback (T-4:55)
Start orbiter aerosurface profile test (T-3:55)
Start main engine gimbal profile test (T-3:30)
Pressurize liquid oxygen tank (T-2:55)
Begin retraction of the gaseous oxygen vent arm (T-2:55)
Fuel cells to internal reactants (T-2:35)
Pressurize liquid hydrogen tank (T-1:57)
Deactivate bi-pod heaters (T-1:52)
Deactivate solid rocket booster joint heaters (T-1)
Orbiter transfers from ground to internal power (T-0:50 seconds)
Ground Launch Sequencer go for auto sequence start (T-0:31 seconds)
Booster gimbal profile (T-0:21 seconds)
Ignition of three space shuttle main engines (T-6.6 seconds)
Booster ignition and liftoff (T-0)

CREW FOR MISSION STS-115
Commander: Brent Jett
Pilot: Chris Ferguson
Payload Commander (MS1): Joe Tanner
Mission Specialist (MS2): Dan Burbank
Mission Specialist (MS3): Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper
Mission Specialist (MS4): Steve MacLean

SUMMARY OF STS-115 LAUNCH DAY CREW ACTIVITIES

Sunday, Aug. 27
6:30 a.m. -- Crew wakes up
7 a.m. -- Breakfast
*10:55 a.m. -- Television coverage from crew quarters
Noon -- Weather briefing
*12:10 p.m. -- Don flight suits
*12:40 p.m. -- Depart for launch pad
*1:10 p.m. -- Arrive at White Room and begin ingress
*2:25 p.m.-- Close crew hatch
*4:30 p.m. -- Launch



World Wide Aerospace Photography
User currently offlineChris78cpr From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2004, 2819 posts, RR: 51
Reply 8, posted (7 years 11 months 1 week 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 2810 times:

When is this baby due back???

Im gonna come out to Orlando maybe in a few days and im gonna book my tkt to try and coincide with seeing this one! Ive always wanted to see it!

Cheers, Chris



5D2/7D/1D2(soon to be a 1Dx) 17-40L/24-105L/70-200F2.8L/100-400L/24F1.4LII/50F1.2L/85F1.2LII
User currently offlineEksath From United States of America, joined Aug 2004, 1295 posts, RR: 25
Reply 9, posted (7 years 11 months 1 week 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 2801 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
ARTICLE EDITOR

Quoting Chris78cpr (Reply 8):
When is this baby due back???

If it launches on 8/27 then return is on 9/7 at 1204H (landing at KSC). This is the current estimate. A day may get added depending on operational conditions and the alternate is Edwards AFB.



World Wide Aerospace Photography
User currently offlineEksath From United States of America, joined Aug 2004, 1295 posts, RR: 25
Reply 10, posted (7 years 11 months 1 week 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 2761 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
ARTICLE EDITOR

Hey guys,

Yesterday's lightning strike on the pad seems to be worse than expected. We are no go for rollback of structure hence the countdown is stopped. Partial transcprit is below:

Photography wise...Monday at 4:04pm will be the next attempt if everything is up to spec.

SATURDAY, AUGUST 26, 2006
1923 GMT (3:23 p.m. EDT)

Technicians performing launch pad inspections this morning reported smelling a charred odor near the liquid hydrogen vent arm that extends from the service tower to the backside of the external tank. Engineers will be inspecting all of the wiring and circuitry to verify the pyrotechnics that fire at liftoff to separate the arm from the shuttle weren't harmed in the lightning strike.

1920 GMT (3:20 p.m. EDT)

In addition to the data reviews, engineers will be looking at one of Atlantis' power buses that had a voltage shift during the lightning strike and the various orbiter systems that feed off that power bus.

1910 GMT (3:10 p.m. EDT)

Yesterday's lightning strike appears to be the most powerful to ever hit a space shuttle launch pad. Mission managers opted to delay launch of Atlantis until no earlier than Monday so engineers could continue gathering data about the health of shuttle and ground systems -- from electronics to pyrotecnics -- and ensure all equipment survived the lightning event without damage.

Engineers have noted a couple of indications of the strike on one of the shuttle's power bus systems and on the launch pad hydrogen vent arm. But thus far they don't have enough information yet to know if there are any problems.

The mission management team will meet at 10 a.m. Sunday to review the progress of the engineering work.



World Wide Aerospace Photography
User currently offlineFleitao From Portugal, joined Feb 2005, 30 posts, RR: 1
Reply 11, posted (7 years 11 months 1 week 2 days 6 hours ago) and read 2745 times:

Hi All,

Quoting Eksath (Reply 4):
Back up landing sites in Spain and North Africa have to staffed and the weather needs to be good there

Lajes AB in Azores is also one of the qualified runways for STS missions, altough it is only for emergengy landings. And there are more, here is the complete listing.

http://www.globalsecurity.org/space/facility/sts-els.htm

Rgds

Francisco Leitão



An Airbus is not a Playstation with wings.
User currently offlineEksath From United States of America, joined Aug 2004, 1295 posts, RR: 25
Reply 12, posted (7 years 11 months 1 week 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 2732 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
ARTICLE EDITOR

Quoting Fleitao (Reply 11):
ajes AB in Azores is also one of the qualified runways for STS missions, altough it is only for emergengy landings. And there are more, here is the complete listing.

Given the 51.6 degree inclination launch angle to make the ISS orbit, the following are the abort sites for STS-115.

Return-to-launch site (RTLS)
Kennedy Space Center Shuttle Landing Facility
TransAtlantic abort landing (TAL)
Primary – Zaragoza (Spain);
alternates Moron (Spain) and Istres (France)
Abort-to-orbit (ATO)

Upon return
Landing
Primary – Kennedy Space Center Shuttle Landing Facility;
alternate White Sands Space Harbor (Texas)



World Wide Aerospace Photography
User currently offlineEksath From United States of America, joined Aug 2004, 1295 posts, RR: 25
Reply 13, posted (7 years 11 months 1 week 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 2705 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
ARTICLE EDITOR

Heads up. This candle is not going to be lit till tuesday..maybe. Smile

Hurrican Ernesto may cause the rollback to VAB if tuesday or wednesday launch is not made.

here is the statement:

Atlantis won't launch until at least Tuesday.

NASA decided sometime overnight to expand its postponement from 24 to 48 hours to allow more time for evaluation of potential damage from a lightning strike at the pad on Friday.

That means Atlantis is now reset for launch no earlier than 3:36 p.m. on Tuesday. The countdown remains in a hold at T-minus 11 hours.



World Wide Aerospace Photography
User currently offlineElpinDAB From United States of America, joined Apr 2005, 468 posts, RR: 4
Reply 14, posted (7 years 11 months 1 week 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 2674 times:

Great info Suresh!
Thanks for keeping us posted. Hopefully it will go up before Hurricane Ernesto passes!


User currently offlineSulman From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 2035 posts, RR: 32
Reply 15, posted (7 years 11 months 1 week 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 2674 times:

It's cool having our very own rocket scientist keeping us posted on things! Thanks for the info Suresh!


It takes a big man to admit they are wrong, and I am not a big man.
User currently offlineEksath From United States of America, joined Aug 2004, 1295 posts, RR: 25
Reply 16, posted (7 years 11 months 1 week 16 hours ago) and read 2639 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
ARTICLE EDITOR

Thanks guys for the feedback. It is great for the ego  

Sorry,guys...forget about shooting STS 115 launch shots..for now..
This candle is not going to be lit anytime soon.

Lightning strike on friday pushed back launch and now Ernesto.
The problem is winds speeds > 45MPH requires that the Stack be inside the VAB. The move from the pad to the VAB takes about 6-8 hours from first motion. So while there is the possibility of a launch tomorrow, a scrub will make it precarious in getting in back to the VAB before the strom hits on wednesday.

Workers are working on getting it back to the VAB now. First motion is currently set for tuesday 1315 H EST. The plan is to get it back out on Friday. Spend 8 days getting it ready to launch and make the end of the window. But, this is cutting it very very close....

http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/storm_graphics/AT05/refresh/AL0506W+gif/115600W_sm.gif

[Edited 2006-08-28 16:03:22]


World Wide Aerospace Photography
User currently offlineEksath From United States of America, joined Aug 2004, 1295 posts, RR: 25
Reply 17, posted (7 years 11 months 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 2574 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
ARTICLE EDITOR

This is unprecendented! The crawler is heading BACK to the pad...the return of Atlantis to the VAB was stopped! We are reversing (well, the crawler can travel forward in both ways)! 7 days approx. to launch if this gamble works! I guess the Russians refused to give up the end of the window!

This decision definitely is quite bold.....this could make or break the program!

I hate to see the end of the STS program because a freakng hurricane wiped out an orbiter on the pad. We are rolling the dice against Mother Nature this time.

here is the live webcam shots. You can clearly see the Stack on the crawler. it moves quite slow (1 MPH). This picture will switch to another view once the Stack is out of the picture. It should be about 5 hours to get back to the pad (est)

http://science.ksc.nasa.gov/shuttle/countdown/video/chan2large.jpg


http://science.ksc.nasa.gov/shuttle/countdown/video/chan3large.jpg

[Edited 2006-08-29 21:25:17]

[Edited 2006-08-29 21:27:53]


World Wide Aerospace Photography
User currently offlineLurch From United States of America, joined Jul 2008, 0 posts, RR: 1
Reply 18, posted (7 years 11 months 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 2481 times:

The info Below is from the NASA Shuttle site.

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/main/index.html

New Launch Date Set for STS-115
As launch preparations resumed at NASA's Kennedy Space Center's Launch Pad 39B on Thursday, mission managers set Sept. 6 as the new date for the launch of Atlantis on Mission STS-115 to the International Space Station. Liftoff time would be 12:29 p.m. EDT.

It would appear that Atlantis is going up after all!


User currently offlineEksath From United States of America, joined Aug 2004, 1295 posts, RR: 25
Reply 19, posted (7 years 11 months 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 2438 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
ARTICLE EDITOR

Ok..here is the tentative schedule of events... Smile

STS-115 BRIEFING & EVENTS SCHEDULE
(All time are Eastern)

All briefings are held inside the Kennedy Press Site auditorium and
will be carried live on NASA TV unless otherwise noted. Questions
will only be taken from media at Kennedy.

L-4 Days - Saturday, Sept. 2

10:30 a.m. - STS-115 crew arrival at Shuttle Landing Facility

L-3 Days - Sunday, Sept. 3

8 a.m. - Launch countdown officially begins (Not on NASA TV)

L-2 Days - Monday, Sept. 4

10 a.m. - Countdown Status Briefing
- Jeff Spaulding, NASA test director
- Robbie Ashley, STS-115 payload manager
- Kathy Winters, shuttle weather officer

4 p.m. (No Earlier Than) - STS-115 Launch Readiness News Conference
- LeRoy Cain, launch integration manager; Space Shuttle Program
- Mike Leinbach, NASA launch director
- U.S. Air Force 1st Lt. Kaleb Nordgren, 45th Weather Squadron

L-1 Day - Tuesday, Sept. 5

11 a.m. (Tentative) - Status Briefing

3 p.m. - Rotating Service Structure moves to launch position

Launch Day - Wednesday, Sept. 6

2:30 a.m. - Tanking commences (Not on NASA TV)

6:30 a.m. - Live launch commentary begins

Launch Day Crew Activities: (Times may vary slightly)
1:30 a.m. -- Crew wakes up (Not on NASA TV)
6:55 a.m. -- Crew photo opportunity
7:58 a.m. -- Weather briefing (CDR, PLT, MS2) (Not on NASA TV)
8:28 a.m. -- Astronauts don flight suits
8:38 a.m. -- Depart for launch pad
9:08 a.m. -- Arrive at white room and begin ingress
10:23 a.m. -- Close crew hatch
12:29 p.m. -- Launch

Launch + 1 hour - Post-launch News Conference
- Michael Griffin, NASA administrator
- Bill Gerstenmaier, associate administrator for Space Operations
- John Shannon, chairman, Mission Management Team
- Mike Leinbach, NASA launch director



World Wide Aerospace Photography
User currently offlineEksath From United States of America, joined Aug 2004, 1295 posts, RR: 25
Reply 20, posted (7 years 10 months 4 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 2334 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
ARTICLE EDITOR

ok. the ball is rolling. the orbiter rollback just took plance. I will upload thosse pics soon. In the meantime, here is the launch clock homding at t-11:00Hrs.

he famous clock. Pad 39 A is behind the flag (the shuttle is on Pad 39B).
http://www.iloveplanets.com/STS115/Snapshot%202006-09-05%2004-08-58.jpg

the famous VAB building which is the hanger for the shuttle
http://www.iloveplanets.com/STS115/Snapshot%202006-09-05%2004-12-16.jpg

pad 39B with the shuttle is on the left and pad 39A is on right with clock and flag.
http://www.iloveplanets.com/STS115/Snapshot%202006-09-05%2004-17-13.jpg



World Wide Aerospace Photography
User currently offlineAirplanepics From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2003, 2730 posts, RR: 41
Reply 21, posted (7 years 10 months 4 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 2334 times:

Just out of interest, why is the flag at half mast? Sept 11?


Simon - London-Aviation.com
User currently offlineEksath From United States of America, joined Aug 2004, 1295 posts, RR: 25
Reply 22, posted (7 years 10 months 4 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 2310 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
ARTICLE EDITOR

Quoting Airplanepics (Reply 21):
Just out of interest, why is the flag at half mast? Sept 11?

nope. NASA employee.



World Wide Aerospace Photography
User currently offlineElpinDAB From United States of America, joined Apr 2005, 468 posts, RR: 4
Reply 23, posted (7 years 10 months 4 weeks 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 2300 times:

Thanks again for keeping us posted! I have my fingers crossed for a successful launch. All prepared to skip class tomorrow  Wink

User currently offlineGary2880 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 24, posted (7 years 10 months 4 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 2279 times:

 headache  better safe than sorry

Launch Scrubbed for 24 Hours
A 24-hour scrub has been called by Mission Managers due to a concern with Fuel Cell 1. Troubleshooting will continue throughout the day. Further updates will follow.


25 BlazingCessna : Wonder what else can happen? Ya know, I had a car that got struck, and I had to change all of the relays and fuses... Bit of trivia, did you know that
26 Post contains links and images Eksath : Here is more. i took these last evening. we scrubbed today because of a voltage spike in fuel cell #1. hopefully we make the rest of the window. 2 day
27 Eksath : Breaking news. Mission is on hold. Rollback of the Stack into VAB is being planned right now. The fuel cell problem seems more problematic that swappi
28 Lnglive1011yyz : Suresh, I was in FL last week, had tickets for the visitor's centre viewing site, and was thoroughly upset about not seeing a launch.. ONE of those t
29 QANTAS077 : thanks for the info and updates Suresh...i wouldn't go anywhere in that thing for all the money in the world!
30 Post contains images JumboJim747 : Same here mate thanks a lot for the info. Why not.? I would go and for nothing i would even pay if its possible . Cheers
31 Post contains links and images Eksath : thanks guys. here is more. I took this on thursday as sunset approached. we are in a mission hold. The go-no go decision will be made tonight. Orbiter
32 Gary2880 : someones stolen your registration plate
33 Post contains links and images Eksath : Good eyes but it is not stolen. Florida does not require a front plate. I just have BMW M logo there. A guy in my car club (www.bimmerfest.com) creat
34 Eksath : Breaking news: 2201 GMT (6:01 p.m. EDT) Shuttle program manager Wayne Hale says "cloud over fuel cell No. 1" has lifted and the device should be safe
35 Post contains links and images Eksath : ok..the hatch is closed...
36 Lnglive1011yyz : mission management team is still briefing on the failed ET sensor. Sensor failure should result in a scrub. They may decide to keep going however. Sho
37 Gary2880 : one of your nicest. getting pleanty of chances to photograph it this time anyway!
38 Post contains images Ander : NOA_Level?? Lovely shots Suresh!!! Cheers, Ander
39 Post contains links and images Eksath : Enjoy guys..more will follow.. I used a 600mm with a 2x converter for this. I just did a screen grab for this upload here. hence the sensor dust and l
40 Post contains images Jkw777 : Absolutely fantastic images Suresh, thank you! I watched on Fox News the launch and was absolutely extatic to see there were no hitches and that every
41 Post contains images Walter2222 : ... and I have already problems with fast aircraft and for Suresh photographing a spacecraft seems so easy... that combo reminds me of the Saturn V T
42 Post contains images BO__einG : How high was the Shuttle by the time the Booster Separation took place? I am guessing it was somewhere in the Stratosphere over the 100,000' mark. Als
43 VasanthD : Great work Atapattu!! Thanks for sharing your valuable photos and the time spent. A quick question: Do you mean you took a printscreen of the visible
44 Post contains links and images Eksath : Thanks guys...Am glad to share it with you. I obviously have more and will upoad as i get time to process them. I probably shot 2-300 hundred views of
45 ElpinDAB : Wow Suresh, Awesome info! Despite how close I was in Daytona, I wasn't able to make it out to see the launch, but I look very forward to seeing your s
46 Post contains links and images Eksath : Ok..guys...here is the launch sequence as i shot it..About 1/3 of th eway into the Roll sequence, the bird disappeared into a cloud. So here is my sho
47 JFKTOWERFAN : Thank you so much for sharing those. It must be amazing to witness up close. The only time I have seen the shuttle was about 18 years ago from the bac
48 Post contains links and images Eksath : Ok..first one in database. Thank you screeners for the quicker queue these days and the hard work. View Large View MediumPhoto © Suresh A. Atapat
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