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Nikon D70 Settings  
User currently offlineAvsfan From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 250 posts, RR: 2
Posted (7 years 11 months 4 weeks 14 hours ago) and read 4540 times:

Hello all,

I am curious to find out what settings the Nikon D70 users use for aviation photography. For me I use the fast action pre-programmed settings, but have been know to use either the pre-programmed outdoors settings or shutter priority to capture motion of propellers and such. Most of my aviation photography is done using a Tamron 70-300mm telephoto lens. The one thing that I have to deal with in my location is heat haze. I would love to combat this, but unfortunately that can be impossible at times.

Any help on this subject would be greatly appreciated.

Louis


"Oh I have slipped the surly bonds of Earth...Put out my hand and touched the face of God"
37 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineNIKV69 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (7 years 11 months 4 weeks 13 hours ago) and read 4528 times:

I shoot in Aperture Priority mode and of late have been getting great results at F8. This is good to perfect conditions with ample sun and exposure comp set correctly and white balance set to sunlight.

User currently offlineCodeshare From Poland, joined Sep 2002, 1854 posts, RR: 1
Reply 2, posted (7 years 11 months 4 weeks 13 hours ago) and read 4528 times:

I would add a +0.3EV exposure correction when the weather is pretty dull.

KS/codesahre



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User currently offlineD L X From United States of America, joined May 1999, 11349 posts, RR: 52
Reply 3, posted (7 years 11 months 4 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 4498 times:

I tend to use the static focusing mode (as opposed to continuous) and that has made a big difference. Continuous mode is constantly guessing where the object is going to be based on where it is now, and where it just was, and focuses on that IF IT CAN before you hit the shutter. In other words, there is no guarantee that the object will be in focus when you depress the shutter. Static mode on the other hand will not release the shutter, even if you hold down the shutter release, until the camera believes the object to be in focus. So, if you get a shot, it will be sharp. If it isn't sharp, you don't get a photo. It took a little practice, but now I have the hang of jamming the shutter release slightly before I want the shot to snap. My photos are MUCH sharper as a result.

Other than that, I use aperture mode usually, but I may switch to shutter in challenging light conditions, or if it's a propjet. I usually add +0.3 or even +0.7 or more exposure compensation, then correct the levels in software. This has the effect of reducing noise. (Noise almost always comes UP from the shadows, and almost never DOWN from the highlights. So, overexposing the shadows has the effect of reducing the noise. This is called "exposing to the right." Google it, and you'll get a lot of helpful tips and explanations about it.)

As far as heathaze, yerfukt. If there are any appreciable temperature differences between you and the object, there will be heathaze. That 300mm end of your zoom will only work to amplify its effects. Avoid shooting objects that are on the other side of a patch of asphalt or runway except in the early morning or evenings.

WHenever possible, use ISO 200.



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User currently offlineAvsfan From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 250 posts, RR: 2
Reply 4, posted (7 years 11 months 4 weeks 5 hours ago) and read 4487 times:

Hello all,

I appreciate all of the responses so far. Hopefully I will be able to test out some things tomorrow at work. I do however need to ask what are the overall settings that you use for the D70. Right now I have the following set for CSM Menu:

    1. Autofocus = AF-S
    2. AF-area mode = Single Area
    3. AF Assist = On
    4. ISO auto = Off
As for the Shooting menu I have the following set:
    1. Optimize Image = Custom
    • Shapening = High
    • Tone comp = High Contrast
    • Color Mode = IIIa (SRGB)
    • Saturation = Normal
    • Hue adjustment = 0

    2. Long Exp. NR = On
    3. Image quality = RAW (for now) I usually shoot JPEG High
    4. White Balance = Auto
    5. ISO = 200
I am curious if I should set the Optimize image settings to normal and make adjustments in PS Elements 3.0.

Louis



"Oh I have slipped the surly bonds of Earth...Put out my hand and touched the face of God"
User currently offlineD L X From United States of America, joined May 1999, 11349 posts, RR: 52
Reply 5, posted (7 years 11 months 4 weeks 5 hours ago) and read 4481 times:

Your settings are basically fine except for your sharpening setting. That's going to KILL your photos! I know I told you this already over email, but I'm putting it here for the benefit of others too.

Sharpening should be your last step in photoediting. If you have the camera set to sharpen, you effectively make it the first step in your photoediting, and that's bad like Michael Jackson.



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User currently offlineDomokun From United States of America, joined Sep 2006, 202 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (7 years 11 months 4 weeks 4 hours ago) and read 4479 times:

I am not sure if this helps; when I had my D70 (and with my D80) I always usually choose aperture priority mode and usually stay at F8.

With my lens (Nikon 18-135 f/3.5-5.6) the camera always chooses the widest possible aperture in the sports or outdoor mode. Since I have been at a distance in many cases, I end up with vignetting which... sucks.


User currently offlineDomokun From United States of America, joined Sep 2006, 202 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (7 years 11 months 4 weeks 4 hours ago) and read 4476 times:

Quoting D L X (Reply 3):
I usually add +0.3 or even +0.7 or more exposure compensation, then correct the levels in software. This has the effect of reducing noise. (Noise almost always comes UP from the shadows, and almost never DOWN from the highlights. So, overexposing the shadows has the effect of reducing the noise. This is called "exposing to the right." Google it, and you'll get a lot of helpful tips and explanations about it.)

This page has some good information on exposing to the right.


User currently offlineScbriml From United Kingdom, joined Jul 2003, 12566 posts, RR: 46
Reply 8, posted (7 years 11 months 4 weeks 3 hours ago) and read 4470 times:
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Quoting D L X (Reply 3):
I tend to use the static focusing mode (as opposed to continuous) and that has made a big difference. Continuous mode is constantly guessing where the object is going to be based on where it is now, and where it just was, and focuses on that IF IT CAN before you hit the shutter. In other words, there is no guarantee that the object will be in focus when you depress the shutter.

My experience is that with a fast lens, continuous focusing mode is not a problem. With a slower lens it can lead to some blurred shots. I understand with a D200 you can set continuous focus with "focus priority" rather than the normal "release priority" - in other words the shutter will not release before the object is in focus. Kind of best of both worlds.

One advantage of single focus mode is that you can set an audible alarm to sound when the shot is in focus.

Personally, I find firing off a series of shots using continuous focus mode easier since you don't have to completely release the shutter button. I struggle a bit to half depress, wait for the beep, depress, release. Half depress, wait for the beep, depress, release. Etc. I suspect with more practice I would get better at it - or maybe I'm just too  old .

For airliners I find continuous focus is fine - they're not moving that fast and tend to move in just one direction! However, fighters displaying at an air show are a different matter. yes 



Time flies like an arrow, but fruit flies like a banana!
User currently offlineViv From Ireland, joined May 2005, 3142 posts, RR: 28
Reply 9, posted (7 years 11 months 4 weeks 3 hours ago) and read 4464 times:

Set in-camera sharpening to 'off'. Better to sharpen in post-processing.

The D70 tends to under-expose slightly, but this is not a problem.

As to the other settings, there is no magic formula - every shot is different. I use full manual, or shutter priority, or aperture priority, with or without exposure compensation, to suit the shot in question. I have never used any of the pre-programmed settings.



Nikon D700, Nikkor 80-400, Fuji X Pro 1, Fujinon 35 f/1.4, Fujinon 18 f/2
User currently offlineJeffM From United States of America, joined May 2005, 3266 posts, RR: 51
Reply 10, posted (7 years 11 months 3 weeks 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 4445 times:

Until you learn to meter manually, you are just letting the camera make a guess on the exposure. There are without a doubt times to use the auto modes, but there is no substitute for an accurate manual exposure with an incident meter.

User currently offlineD L X From United States of America, joined May 1999, 11349 posts, RR: 52
Reply 11, posted (7 years 11 months 3 weeks 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 4417 times:

Jeff, the sky isn't incident though, is it? Isn't it a light source? How do you meter the sky?


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User currently offlineMikephotos From United States of America, joined Oct 2000, 2923 posts, RR: 54
Reply 12, posted (7 years 11 months 3 weeks 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 4407 times:

You want to meter the light falling on your subject, not the sky. Manual metering with an incident meter is great but in real-world aviation shooting it's just not practical 99% of the times. At least not my style of shooting. With today's incamera meters being highly accurate I'll stick with it along with my knowledge/experience to know when to adjust exposure based on the scene. I mentioned this before but when you're out there chasing planes in a tight back-seat while trying to juggle lenses and swapping between film & digital, a light meter is just not going to work. Sure, you'll get great exposures but you'll miss 80% of the planes you're trying to shoot  Smile Now for work where you have time to setup and get accurate readings, there's no better way than going manual to nail the shot.

Mike


User currently offlineJeffM From United States of America, joined May 2005, 3266 posts, RR: 51
Reply 13, posted (7 years 11 months 3 weeks 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 4395 times:

Quoting Mikephotos (Reply 12):
Manual metering with an incident meter is great but in real-world aviation shooting it's just not practical 99% of the times. At least not my style of shooting. With today's incamera meters being highly accurate I'll stick with it along with my knowledge/experience to know when to adjust exposure based on the scene.

Couldn't disagree more. Taking an incident reading takes less then 5 seconds, and you only have to do it when the light changes.

Today's, or yesterday's for that matter, incamera meters will make a good guess. I've missed far more shots using the incamera meter because it made the wrong choice and exposed improperly then I ever have using my Sekonic.

Quoting D L X (Reply 11):
Jeff, the sky isn't incident though, is it? Isn't it a light source? How do you meter the sky?

Why are you metering the sky? As Mike mentioned, you want to meter the light falling on your subject, as it is a constant. Measuring the light reflected off your subject as your camera does (or tries to) is not as accurate, and more prone to error.

Take a black cat sitting on a white rug. Your camera will probably expose one or the other correctly when you use it's meter. But, if you know what amount of light is falling on the cat and the rug (which is the same amount by the way...) then you only have to set your camera for that amount, and your exposure will be correct for both.


User currently offlineD L X From United States of America, joined May 1999, 11349 posts, RR: 52
Reply 14, posted (7 years 11 months 3 weeks 6 days 14 hours ago) and read 4388 times:

Fair enough Jeff, but how can you measure the light falling on a plane a couple hundred feet above you? I don't think the light falling on the plane is the same as the light falling on the meter in your hand, is it?


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User currently offlineMikephotos From United States of America, joined Oct 2000, 2923 posts, RR: 54
Reply 15, posted (7 years 11 months 3 weeks 6 days 14 hours ago) and read 4388 times:

Quoting JeffM (Reply 13):
Couldn't disagree more. Taking an incident reading takes less then 5 seconds, and you only have to do it when the light changes.

Not trying to sound cocky here but that 5 seconds will (in my shooting experience) cause you to miss out on a ton of shots. It's just not worth it, especially when my my F5 has being dead-on accurate for 95% of my slides. And no, you can't correct those in photoshop  Smile Plus, another piece of equipment is just a nightmare for what little benefit (again, IMO and my shooting style) it provides.

Quoting JeffM (Reply 13):
Today's, or yesterday's for that matter, incamera meters will make a good guess. I've missed far more shots using the incamera meter because it made the wrong choice and exposed improperly then I ever have using my Sekonic.

And I have the total different experience. My F5 has nailed 95% of the shots, since I've owned it. And we're talking slides here, not digital. The only time it runs into trouble is snow scenes with white aircraft (the 3d matrix tends to underexpose a bit) but I know when to dial in comp to nail the shot.

Another problem with using a meter "on the field" is that readings of the light from where you are standing is not the same as the light falling on the aircraft, so an incident reading would be useless, no? Sure, the Sekonic is probably a slightly better reflective spot meter than incamera but I've never really had a problem with my exposures.

I'm not arguing the benefit of the external meter, it's a great tool that everyone should have but in some cases (as you've mentione) the benefit is minimal.

Mike


User currently offlineDiezel From Netherlands, joined Oct 2002, 646 posts, RR: 11
Reply 16, posted (7 years 11 months 3 weeks 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 4376 times:

Quoting Viv (Reply 9):
Set in-camera sharpening to 'off'. Better to sharpen in post-processing.

My choice is to shoot RAW, set the sharpening to Extra High. This way I can judge the sharpness of the picture on my camera display just a bit easier.

When it comes to editing I set the sharpness to low or to none and adjust using PS. One of the little advantages of RAW  Smile

Roel.



Never be afraid of what you like. (Miles Davis)
User currently offlineJeffM From United States of America, joined May 2005, 3266 posts, RR: 51
Reply 17, posted (7 years 11 months 3 weeks 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 4376 times:

Quoting D L X (Reply 14):
how can you measure the light falling on a plane a couple hundred feet above you? I don't think the light falling on the plane is the same as the light falling on the meter in your hand, is it?

Of course it is. Unless one of the two of you are in a shadow.

Quoting Mikephotos (Reply 15):
but that 5 seconds will (in my shooting experience) cause you to miss out on a ton of shots.

How can that be? I take a meter reading when I get out of the car, and maybe once or twice during my time at the field. Seldom do I have to make adjustments, unless the sun is setting, then one every 15 minutes is more then adequate.

Quoting Mikephotos (Reply 15):
The only time it runs into trouble is snow scenes with white aircraft (the 3d matrix tends to underexpose a bit) but I know when to dial in comp to nail the shot.

BINGO. But, if you know what the exposure should be, then why not just set it in the camera and forget about all this compensation bs? If that is what you like, then so be it. You have more experience then most guys here and that is something (experience) that must be learned.

Quoting Mikephotos (Reply 15):
Another problem with using a meter "on the field" is that readings of the light from where you are standing is not the same as the light falling on the aircraft, so an incident reading would be useless, no

Absolutely not. The light falling on me is the same falling on the plane. Our distance to the sun is for all practical purposes the same, even though we could be a mile apart. If I take a meter reading, then walk a mile and take another reading, guess what? I get the same reading.

Quoting Mikephotos (Reply 15):
Sure, the Sekonic is probably a slightly better reflective spot meter than incamera

No, it's not a reflective spot meter at all. That is my point. Reflective metering isn't very accurate due to the many variables in your subjects 'reflectiveness'. A shiny white plane reflects light, it will fool your camera meter, a soft fuzy white cat, does not reflect light, it too will fool your camera meter. The incident meter doesn't care what light gets reflected, only what falls on it. BIG (read HUGE) difference.

Quoting Mikephotos (Reply 15):
And we're talking slides here, not digital.

That is exactly the reason digital shooters should be using an incident meter. Slide film as you know, is more forgiving, though not as much as print film, it has more exposure latitude then digital, which we all know is not very forgiving. So for you, wailing away on film, most of your mistakes are corrected in the lab, or 'covered' by the increased latitude of the emulsion, whereas with digital, you have to be much more accurate in the camera.


User currently offlineMaiznblu_757 From United States of America, joined Mar 2002, 5112 posts, RR: 50
Reply 18, posted (7 years 11 months 3 weeks 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 4373 times:

Jeff,

What meter do you use again? I get some bonus munny in a few days and need to buy a toy or three.  Wink


User currently offlineMikephotos From United States of America, joined Oct 2000, 2923 posts, RR: 54
Reply 19, posted (7 years 11 months 3 weeks 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 4362 times:

Quoting JeffM (Reply 17):
Of course it is. Unless one of the two of you are in a shadow.

Ah, bingo. There are many times while shooting with puffy clouds I'll be in shade/dim light while the aircraft is brightly lit.

Quoting JeffM (Reply 17):
How can that be? I take a meter reading when I get out of the car, and maybe once or twice during my time at the field. Seldom do I have to make adjustments, unless the sun is setting, then one every 15 minutes is more then adequate.

Light changes often, come on you know that. Thin clouds, while still allowing for quality shooting will change readings. Even if there are no clouds in the sky, light changes as the sun moves down. Sure, you don't have to meter every shot but why bother if you (me) can nail the exposure without the add'l work? It's just another piece of gear that gets in the way of very fast paced shooting in tight quarters. No thanks.

Quoting JeffM (Reply 17):
BINGO. But, if you know what the exposure should be, then why not just set it in the camera and forget about all this compensation bs? If that is what you like, then so be it. You have more experience then most guys here and that is something (experience) that must be learned.

Because as mentioned above, light readings change often depending on what's happening above. Add light reflecting off the snow onto the aircraft and you'd be toast if you did that.

Quoting JeffM (Reply 17):
Absolutely not. The light falling on me is the same falling on the plane. Our distance to the sun is for all practical purposes the same, even though we could be a mile apart. If I take a meter reading, then walk a mile and take another reading, guess what? I get the same reading.

You can't tell me you've never been out shooting and there's this huge f'in puffy cloud over you causing your general area to be dimly lit while the aircraft a hundred feet away perfectly lit? I can't count the number of times that has happened.

Quoting JeffM (Reply 17):
No, it's not a reflective spot meter at all. That is my point. Reflective metering isn't very accurate due to the many variables in your subjects 'reflectiveness'. A shiny white plane reflects light, it will fool your camera meter, a soft fuzy white cat, does not reflect light, it too will fool your camera meter. The incident meter doesn't care what light gets reflected, only what falls on it. BIG (read HUGE) difference.

What I meant was that if you're under clouds and the plane a hunderd feet away is perfectly lit your incident meter is useless. You would then switch the Sekonic to relfective spot (if yours is capable with both) to meter the plane.

Quoting JeffM (Reply 17):
That is exactly the reason digital shooters should be using an incident meter. Slide film as you know, is more forgiving, though not as much as print film, it has more exposure latitude then digital, which we all know is not very forgiving. So for you, wailing away on film, most of your mistakes are corrected in the lab, or 'covered' by the increased latitude of the emulsion, whereas with digital, you have to be much more accurate in the camera

No, I don't know. Slide file is not forgiving. If I screw up an exposure by 1/3 stop you know where the slide goes when I get them back? In the garbage. Digital (IMO) is way more forgiving than slides. I could screw up a exposure by a a full stop (as long as I don't blow highlights) and it's easily corrected post-process. You ever see a Kodachrome slide under or overexposed by one stop? Probably not because they're all in the trash.

Mike


User currently offlineJeffM From United States of America, joined May 2005, 3266 posts, RR: 51
Reply 20, posted (7 years 11 months 3 weeks 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 4356 times:

Quoting Mikephotos (Reply 19):
You can't tell me you've never been out shooting and there's this huge f'in puffy cloud over you causing your general area to be dimly lit while the aircraft a hundred feet away perfectly lit?

All I can say is come to Colorado Smile O.k. so let's say a puffy cloud shows up....I've already metered for the sun, so it doesn't matter if I'm under the cloud or not, my camera is set for the object in the sun, as it should be.

Quoting Mikephotos (Reply 19):
if you're under clouds and the plane a hunderd feet away is perfectly lit your incident meter is useless. You would then switch the Sekonic to relfective spot (if yours is capable with both) to meter the plane.

Just as you 'dial in compesation', i'll just add 1/3 or 1/2 or more stops of exposure via the shutter speed or aperture. My meter doesn't have spot metering, and don't want it. If for what ever reason I should need spot metering, my camera has it.

Quoting Mikephotos (Reply 19):
Slide file is not forgiving

Slides have better exposure lattitude then digital Mike. Your tolerance to that may be less forgiving.  Wink

Quoting Mikephotos (Reply 19):
Add light reflecting off the snow onto the aircraft and you'd be toast if you did that.

Absolutely not. It seems you don't have a good grasp of metering light except for with your camera. The light falling on to a plane is always going to be brighter then what is reflected on to it. It's called physics. If I expose for the light falling onto the plane, or any other object, any light reflected from the same source, can not be the same measurement. It's simple, and it's what photographers that shoot portraits count on. We use a reflector to 'fill' in the shadow, by reflecting the main light, which in your case would be the sun. Read up on light fall off and you'll get the point.

Quoting Maiznblu_757 (Reply 18):
What meter do you use again? I get some bonus munny in a few days and need to buy a toy or three.

Chad, it is the Sekonic L358. Less then $300 bucks, you'll be amazed, and it accepts the PocketWizard module if you need it.


User currently offlineNIKV69 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 21, posted (7 years 11 months 3 weeks 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 4352 times:

Well I was going to post some more about the settings I use but this is much better!  biggrin 

Mike have you decided to become a screener yet? I mean if you have enough time to type all this out you have the time to look at a few pics!  airplane 

Well I am going to sit back and enjoy this, you can sure learn a lot about exposure!  camera 


User currently offlineMikephotos From United States of America, joined Oct 2000, 2923 posts, RR: 54
Reply 22, posted (7 years 11 months 3 weeks 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 4348 times:

Quoting JeffM (Reply 20):
All I can say is come to Colorado O.k. so let's say a puffy cloud shows up....I've already metered for the sun, so it doesn't matter if I'm under the cloud or not, my camera is set for the object in the sun, as it should be.

Then you should just toss your Sekonic because you don't need it anymore, you're all-set! You're dialed in for sun.

Quoting JeffM (Reply 20):
Just as you 'dial in compesation', i'll just add 1/3 or 1/2 or more stops of exposure via the shutter speed or aperture. My meter doesn't have spot metering, and don't want it. If for what ever reason I should need spot metering, my camera has it.

It seems we both end up with a perfectly exposed shots, mine with a bit less work  Wink

Quoting JeffM (Reply 20):
Slides have better exposure lattitude then digital Mike. Your tolerance to that may be less forgiving.

But digital you have a greater ability to correct errors, slides you do not. You overexpose or underexpose a slide and you're done. Digital you can correct, easily I might add most fair to minor exposure problems or even save huge errors. I'm more of a final output guy, I worry about the final quality of an image/slide. If you can easily correct a digital image that to me means you have more lattitude in exposure. Sure, technically film/slides have a great lattitude but in the real world experience digital is far more forgiving, you'd be a fool to think otherwise. I'm not a measurabator.

Quoting JeffM (Reply 20):
It seems you don't have a good grasp of metering light except for with your camera

All I care about is having a good grasp of producing stunning slides and damn, I do a good job at it, with my incamera meter, oh dear. If it requires you to have an external meter to produce the same, than that is totally fine. I am not arguing that an incident meter is not a good idea. I am saying that it's totally useless for most of what I do and can actually be a handicap. If I wanted to start shooting black and white cats, you bet I'll give you can call and get some help with purchasing one.

Mike


User currently offlineD L X From United States of America, joined May 1999, 11349 posts, RR: 52
Reply 23, posted (7 years 11 months 3 weeks 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 4345 times:

Quoting JeffM (Reply 20):
All I can say is come to Colorado O.k. so let's say a puffy cloud shows up....I've already metered for the sun, so it doesn't matter if I'm under the cloud or not, my camera is set for the object in the sun, as it should be.

What if the plane moves under a cloud? Broken, wind-driven clouds are the norm here in Washington some months. I've seen the camera wildly alter the shutter speeds while shooting as series of shots of a single plane from takeoff to climbout, or final to touchdown. My answer has always been to shoot RAW, slightly overexpose, then correct down as needed in CS2.



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User currently offlineMikephotos From United States of America, joined Oct 2000, 2923 posts, RR: 54
Reply 24, posted (7 years 11 months 3 weeks 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 4342 times:

Quoting NIKV69 (Reply 21):
Mike have you decided to become a screener yet? I mean if you have enough time to type all this out you have the time to look at a few pics!

I'll be too busy taking a physics course, sorry. Gotta go to Denver Jeff's Meters & Things to pick up some books and this stupid thing they call a light meter, what is that anyway?  Wink

Mike


25 Maiznblu_757 : Thanks Jeff! Will check it out.
26 Post contains images Lennymuir : Back to Avsfan. ...I'll leave the pedants to argue about incident light... Mine is set as: 1. Optimize Image = Custom Sharpening = -2 or off (main sha
27 Post contains images JeffM : Actually your not too far off. Sometimes I just use the 'Sunny 16' and things are just as good. I can handle the 'extra' work. I'm not lazy. I don't
28 D L X : GASP!! Don't you end up with shadow noise when you do this? I've tried this sometimes with good results, but it takes a pretty nonvariable day. That
29 Lennymuir : No problems with noise whatsoever Damon. -0.3EV when in direct sun, 0EV under obscured light and +0.3EV under cloud. Experience, trial & error and hap
30 Post contains images D L X : Interesting! I found it odd because it's basically the opposite of shooting to the right, which says overexpose as much as you can without blowing yo
31 Lennymuir : On the D70.. shooting to the right with massive 'highlights' flashing like a super nova on the histogram means badly overexposed to me. I cannot rescu
32 JeffM : LOL....hardly an argument. I have nothing to argue, that accomplishes nothing. Two sides of an issue were discussed by two individuals that believe i
33 Post contains images Mikephotos : Ah, I see....that's where we are different. I'm a lazy MF If something can be done properly in 5 steps rather than 10 I'm all over it. I know you lov
34 OlegShv : Same here! Shooting at f/8, ISO200, sRGB3a, JPEG fine- large, no sharpening, no tone comp, saturation normal, depending on the weather I set WB to su
35 D L X : Here's the thing about the D70 - to understand the D70 display, to TRULY understand the d70 display, you have to understand how JPEG works. JPEg work
36 Post contains images Mikephotos : If you got a $1 for each time you posted the word bright in the above post you'd have enough to get a D2X But I do agree with you from what I recall w
37 D L X : Sorry. I'm just reading that again now, and it sounds like I'm talking down to people. My bad.
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