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Night Photography: Questions  
User currently offlineAirbusA346 From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2004, 7437 posts, RR: 2
Posted (7 years 10 months 4 weeks 18 hours ago) and read 3948 times:

Well the other night I was taken photographys of fireworks, with my 350D and Sigma 70-300mm and the shutter speed was so slow compared to day time photography, and the ISO was on 100.

Is the shutter speed normally slower at night or is it the camera/settings.

This is my first time at shooting photographs at night with my 350D also.

Thanks
Tom.


Tom Walker '086' First Officer of a A318/A319 for Air Lambert - Hours Flown: 17 hour 05 minutes (last updated 24/12/05).
6 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineQantasA332 From Australia, joined Dec 2003, 1500 posts, RR: 25
Reply 1, posted (7 years 10 months 4 weeks 18 hours ago) and read 3941 times:

1). You can increase the ISO to obtain a faster shutter speed.

2). Typically, when photographing fireworks, you want a slow shutter speed.

Cheers,
Gabriel


User currently offlineFYODOR From Russia, joined May 2005, 661 posts, RR: 15
Reply 2, posted (7 years 10 months 4 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 3926 times:
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AirbusA346,

QantasA332 is correct regarding fireworks - slow shutter is a benefit for such shots.

But if you are looking for other options - at 350D try to use ISO400 for night shots. ISO800 is already very noisy.


User currently offlineJorge1812 From Germany, joined Apr 2004, 3149 posts, RR: 8
Reply 3, posted (7 years 10 months 4 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 3926 times:

Quoting AirbusA346 (Thread starter):
Is the shutter speed normally slower at night or is it the camera/settings.

Depending on the program you used. In Tv the shutter speed is set by you. In all others IIRC it's going down to get more light onto the sensor. I think you should read your manual before asking such questions, it's obviously that you need lower shutter speeds when shooting in bad light. Don't want to sound like a teacher, but that's one of the most basic things in photography and something everyone should know.

Georg


User currently offlineQantasA332 From Australia, joined Dec 2003, 1500 posts, RR: 25
Reply 4, posted (7 years 10 months 4 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 3908 times:

A few examples, if I may (click for larger versions)...  Smile





Those two were shot at ISO 200, 2.5 sec (Tv mode). I chose these settings carefully: it was quite windy, and I didn't want the fireworks to "blur" laterally too much. So, I knocked the ISO up to 200, allowing myself a somewhat faster shutter speed to get the right effect.



1.3 sec, also ISO 200. I didn't want the upper bursts to blur too much - laterally or otherwise - so that I would get a "sparkling" appearance.

Cheers,
Gabriel


User currently offlineOly720man From United Kingdom, joined May 2004, 6754 posts, RR: 11
Reply 5, posted (7 years 10 months 4 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 3900 times:

I did some the other night (300D and Sigma 18-50DG) and was using 30s @F22, ISO100 to get fireworks in the garden.

As to shutter speeds, to get an exposure you need a certain amount of light and at night there's less of it, so you need a longer shutter speed. Have you never noticed that on cloudy days the shutter speed is slower than on sunny days? It's slower in the early morning or late afternoon than at midday?



wheat and dairy can screw up your brain
User currently offlineAirbusA346 From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2004, 7437 posts, RR: 2
Reply 6, posted (7 years 10 months 4 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 3845 times:

Quoting Oly720man (Reply 5):
Have you never noticed that on cloudy days the shutter speed is slower than on sunny days? It's slower in the early morning or late afternoon than at midday?

I have never taken much notice of that no, but because the effect of the fireworks disappeared so quickly, I noticed that the shutter was taking for ever.

And I didn't want  flamed 

Tom.



Tom Walker '086' First Officer of a A318/A319 for Air Lambert - Hours Flown: 17 hour 05 minutes (last updated 24/12/05).
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