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Photo Accceptance - Pre-Screening (Sketty222)  
User currently offlineSketty222 From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2006, 1778 posts, RR: 3
Posted (5 years 7 months 2 weeks 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 2175 times:

Hi guys

As Ive probably mentioned to you before that Im pretty new to photography but am quite enthusiastic and want to try and progress further.

I decided that I would head out to NCL yesterday to try and get some shots whilst the weather was decent. Now I normally shoot using the auto settings on my Canon 450D so I thought I would try and use the advanced settings, in particular the TV setting.

I had the camera set up on TV with Auto White Balance, ISO at 100 and shutter speed at 1/3200. These are the images I was able to capture (unedited but reduced to 1MB to be uploaded at photobucket) and they are very dark.
Can anyone tell me where I have gone wrong and if these images could be saved in anyway?

Ive started to shoot in RAW also so I do have the CR2 image as well.

http://i196.photobucket.com/albums/aa135/Sketty22/IMG_1317.jpg

http://i196.photobucket.com/albums/aa135/Sketty22/IMG_1304.jpg


I know the images are quite soft but I believe that is because of the lens I am using at the minute (Tamron 70-300)


Thanks for any advice you can offer


There's flying and then there's flying
9 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineTimdeGroot From Netherlands, joined Apr 2002, 3674 posts, RR: 64
Reply 1, posted (5 years 7 months 2 weeks 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 2171 times:
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1/3200 sound way too high a shutterspeed for these conditions. Are you certain you did not underexpose them because they are way too dark.

The softness looks salvagable with some PS but you need to work on your exposure first.

Tim



Alderman Exit
User currently offlineAKE0404AR From United States of America, joined May 2000, 2535 posts, RR: 46
Reply 2, posted (5 years 7 months 2 weeks 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 2169 times:

They are both totally underexposed, care to share the EXIF.

For a newbie....just a few general tips:

Sun always in the back, f8 to f11 is a good aperture, shutter should more or less equal your focal length (300mm at least 1/250 sec or greater) and one important advice I would like to give you: read your manual and buy a book about photography to understand the basics.

Vasco

p.s come back and ask more questions and post your images, there are a ton of people who can help you out!


User currently offlineRonS From United States of America, joined Feb 2009, 762 posts, RR: 22
Reply 3, posted (5 years 7 months 2 weeks 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 2136 times:

Anet member RudyC gave me the best advise! "Shoot in Manual and simply use your Exposure Meter." With the right conditions and trial and error, eventually it all just clicks!


All opinions expressed by me are my own opinions & do not represent the opinions in any way of my employers.
User currently offlineAlevik From Canada, joined Mar 2009, 1040 posts, RR: 9
Reply 4, posted (5 years 7 months 2 weeks 4 days 9 hours ago) and read 2117 times:
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HEAD SCREENER

Looks like you have already received advice from the experts.

I would never shoot aviation in shutter priority. For your next outing, set to aperture priority, select f8 or f9 and make sure the shutter speed automatically selected by your camera meter is equal to the inverse of the longest focal length of your lens. If you are shooting with a 100-400, the shutter speed should be at least 1/400 sec.

Your 450D is very capable of getting the right exposure. For editing ability, and depending on your camera meter, you may want to dial in an exposure compensation of -0.3, in other words intentionally underexpose by 1/3 of a stop. it is better to be under than over exposed during editing.

I would suggest for cropping that you are a bit "distant" - the aircraft is not filling the frame. Tighten up a bit. For my eye, the Thompson is low in the frame and the Thomas Cook is high.

I now have over 350 shots on anet (still just a beginner) but your first attempts here are as good as my first ones so keep at it and you will get there.



Improvise, adapt, overcome.
User currently offlineSketty222 From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2006, 1778 posts, RR: 3
Reply 5, posted (5 years 7 months 2 weeks 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 2098 times:



Quoting TimdeGroot (Reply 1):
1/3200 sound way too high a shutterspeed for these conditions. Are you certain you did not underexpose them because they are way too dark.

The softness looks salvagable with some PS but you need to work on your exposure first

I thought the higher the shutterspeed the better fr fast moving items but this isn't obviously isn't the case and just the way Ive interpreted it from my manual

Quoting AKE0404AR (Reply 2):
f8 to f11 is a good aperture, shutter should more or less equal your focal length (300mm at least 1/250 sec or greater) and one important advice I would like to give you: read your manual and buy a book about photography to understand the basics.



Quoting Alevik (Reply 4):
For your next outing, set to aperture priority, select f8 or f9 and make sure the shutter speed automatically selected by your camera meter is equal to the inverse of the longest focal length of your lens. If you are shooting with a 100-400, the shutter speed should be at least 1/400 sec.

Thanks for the advice guys, I'll take this onboard and hopefully I will eventually get the results I am looking for

Quoting AKE0404AR (Reply 2):
p.s come back and ask more questions and post your images, there are a ton of people who can help you out!

Vasco, its this attitude that makes me like a.net so much. You are such a friendly and helpful bunch of guys and willing to help even the amateur, amateur photographer like me

Quoting Alevik (Reply 4):
I would suggest for cropping that you are a bit "distant" - the aircraft is not filling the frame. Tighten up a bit. For my eye, the Thompson is low in the frame and the Thomas Cook is high.

I hadn't cropped the photos at all and thats why they look so distant and low/high in the frame

Thanks again guys



There's flying and then there's flying
User currently offlineZakHH From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (5 years 7 months 2 weeks 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 2071 times:



Quoting Sketty222 (Reply 5):
I thought the higher the shutterspeed the better fr fast moving items but this isn't obviously isn't the case and just the way Ive interpreted it from my manual

Basically, that is correct. But (and that's a huge 'but'): in TV mode, the camera will automatically determine the correct aperture for the shutter speed you set, based on the available light.

But if the shutter speed is set too short, and the required aperture is bigger than the maximum your lens offers, then your shots will end underexposed. And that is exactly what happened to you here.

The minimum f-stop value (equaling the maximum aperture) that was available for your lens was probably around 4.0 or 4.5. But with that aperture, the shortest possible exposure time (for a correct exposure) would have been probably around something like 1/500 or 1/640.

However, you forced the camera to use 1/3200. The camera could not increase the aperture beyond the maximum, and so you ended up underexposed.

As mentioned above, you could have avoided it by using AV mode, instead of TV. But that's not a guarantee, either. No matter what mode you use, do always check the results after the shot.

If you shoot in TV, and you see that the camera used the maximum aperture (i.e. the smallest f-stop available for your lens), then you will need a slower shutter speed - or increase the ISO settings.

If you shoot in AV, and you see that the exposure times get too long, you will have to use a bigger aperture (smaller f-stop value) - or increase the ISO settings.

As for the ISO settings - you probably know that higher ISO settings will produce more grain, so that's not an ultimate solution, either. ISO 200 should be workable with your camera, but 400 and above will probably produce too much grain for the photos to meet this site's requirements.

You just can't buy more light without paying a certain price...  Wink


User currently offlineRuudb From Netherlands, joined Jun 2005, 164 posts, RR: 5
Reply 7, posted (5 years 7 months 2 weeks 3 days ago) and read 2066 times:



Quoting Alevik (Reply 4):
in other words intentionally underexpose by 1/3 of a stop. it is better to be under than over exposed during editing.

I am sorry but I don't really agree with underexposing you are introducing noise, it is better to look on your histogram, on the camera keep the diagram to the right (normally it is the histogram of a Jpeg picture and in RAW you have enough headroom to compensate the eventually overexposure, which will be zero to none if your histogram doesnt end in a peak)


User currently offlineSketty222 From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2006, 1778 posts, RR: 3
Reply 8, posted (5 years 7 months 2 weeks 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 2038 times:



Quoting ZakHH (Reply 6):

Thanks for this advice. Hopefully we will have some decent weather here (North-East England) at the weekend so will hopefully put this advice to the test and see hwat results I get



There's flying and then there's flying
User currently offlineZakHH From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (5 years 7 months 2 weeks 2 days 1 hour ago) and read 2009 times:



Quoting Sketty222 (Reply 8):
Hopefully we will have some decent weather here (North-East England) at the weekend

Decent weather in north-east England - isn't that an oxymoron?  Wink

Seriously, practice is definitely the best you can do. Go out with your camera as good as you can, and try the different modes with different settings. Especially with static motives, try whatever setting would seem to make sense to you, and check the different results.

Are you familiar with reading EXIF data? Because that's an ultimate tool for such tests. It's basically the camera settings for each shot, that are stored within each file your camera produces.

Almost every photo software offers a function to view the EXIF data for a shot. It will then tell you everything, from the camera type over the focal length, shutter speed, aperture, ISO settings etc.

So if you shoot a motive with different settings, you can easily look the settings up later on, and draw your conclusions from it.

Some background information on EXIF can be found here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exchangeable_image_file_format

Now - good luck with the weather...  Wink


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