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How Much Exposure Compensation For These?  
User currently offlineEGGD From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2001, 12443 posts, RR: 34
Posted (13 years 3 weeks 1 day ago) and read 2451 times:

Hi guys,

As i may well have told you three billion times, last saturday i went out to BRS to practise with the new camera.

What i found was that alot of pictures came out over exposed, here are the examples:

http://aircraft.8m.net/PH-KVH2.jpg

http://aircraft.8m.net/G-JEDO.jpg

http://aircraft.8m.net/G-BRYI2.jpg

http://aircraft.8m.net/G-IGOJ.jpg

Now, i had the ISO setting at 100, and since turned it down to 50. Would this mean that i'd need less compensation at ISO50?

These were with no compensation, but i did then change it to -1 (i assume this is in the right direction Big grin), which i think is 3 stops (?) with -1/3 and -2/3 between it and no compensation (ok i dug a nice hole there Big grin).

What should i have it set too for these light conditions? How much am i overexposing?

Just for fun, i want to show you a few other pictures i took which are not A.net quality, but i really like:

http://aircraft.8m.net/tail.jpg

http://aircraft.8m.net/dash8approach.jpg

Regards

Dan

NB|| You may have to copy the URL's and paste them into a new browser window thanks to freeservers Big grin.



7 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlinePlanedoctor From United States of America, joined Mar 2001, 286 posts, RR: 1
Reply 1, posted (13 years 3 weeks 22 hours ago) and read 2414 times:

Dan,

You have the Pro90, right? Most Pro90 users find that the camera overexposes by 1/3 to 2/3 a stop. I usually shoot at -1/3 or -2/3 stop for most shots. Also, be careful what you meter on. Once you get it figured out, it is pretty easy to nail exposure every time.
Your pics seem to be off by only about that much. Those settings hold true for most lighting conditions, so you can pretty much set exposure compensation to either one and leave it there for good. Good luck!
-Ken


User currently offlinePlanedoctor From United States of America, joined Mar 2001, 286 posts, RR: 1
Reply 2, posted (13 years 3 weeks 22 hours ago) and read 2407 times:

Also Dan, I forgot to mention, it makes no difference if you have the ISO at 50 or 100 as far as compensation. I do suggest 50 for as much of your photography as possible, as it is so much cleaner than any other ISO on that camera.

-Ken


User currently offlineEGGD From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2001, 12443 posts, RR: 34
Reply 3, posted (13 years 3 weeks 22 hours ago) and read 2407 times:

Yeah, i guess. But i think you lose 1 stop on the shutter speed when you shoot ISO 50 (which ain't too bad Big grin).

I do now shoot on ISO 50 almost exclusively.

Thanks for the clarification on the Exposure.

Regards

Dan


User currently offlinePlanedoctor From United States of America, joined Mar 2001, 286 posts, RR: 1
Reply 4, posted (13 years 3 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 2397 times:

Dan,

Yes, ISO 50 is 1 stop slower than ISO 100, but assuming you are in "P" mode, it won't affect exposure per se; the camera will have to select a shutter speed and/or aperture to give it one stop more light. But, all other things being equal, you picture will not under-expose by a stop. Exposure compensation and the camera's meter take this into consideration- it will take what it determines to be the right aperture/shutter combo for the given ISO speed and exposure compensation setting.

Put another way, changing the ISO on a digicam doesn't change your exposure per se while in P mode- it just means that a different shutter/aperture combo are selected to acheive the same exposure.

As you can tell, I am having a hard time explaining this. For practical purposes, I mean this, Dan: Set the camera to ISO 50, set exposure compensation to -1/3 or -2/3, and don't worry about the ISO's being different- you will still get the same exposure. Trust me...  Smile

One more thing you might try- keep the exposure compensation at 0 or -1/3 and try putting the spot meter on (the "little box" button). When you are shooting a white (or any colored, for that matter) plane, put the box right on the plane while you half-press the shutter. (Essentially you are metering on the plane body only). Then recompose your shot if you need. This is what I found works best with the Pro90. Try it and tell me what you think.


-Ken


User currently offlineEGGD From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2001, 12443 posts, RR: 34
Reply 5, posted (13 years 3 weeks 15 hours ago) and read 2377 times:

I took about half my pictures using spot metering, although i couldn't tell whether it helped or not.

I also screwed up on the shutter speed alot also Big grin.

although i will use P mode from now on  Smile

Regards

Dan


User currently offlineYKA From Netherlands, joined Sep 2001, 766 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (13 years 3 weeks 14 hours ago) and read 2372 times:

My 20 year old camera has the same problem and the fact that it has center weighed meter makes even worse. I have set settings for specific conditons that guarentee a proper exposure. However when light conditions are tricky I fill the viewfinder with something white + sunlit and take the reading of that. Works like a charm and diffrence is substential then if I were to take a reading of the actual scene.

User currently offlineTomH From United States of America, joined May 1999, 960 posts, RR: 2
Reply 7, posted (13 years 3 weeks 11 hours ago) and read 2369 times:

EGGD,
I looked at the four photos. You are over exposing by no more than 1 f-stop. I can't relate to all that camera-specific information in your post's follows ups, but still, it should be easy on any camera to learn how to adjust/compensate by 1 f-stop.

Don't forget, at this time of year we have low angle light, which tends to give a brighter fuselage illumination than at other times of the year. I think it is actually better for this type of photograhy at this time of year.

TomH


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