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Photographers Or Spotters?  
User currently offlineJakTrax From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2005, 4936 posts, RR: 7
Posted (4 years 3 months 3 weeks 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 6783 times:

Seeing as Paul Markman and his forum-bolstering threads seem to have (temporarily?) vanished I thought I'd start something a little entertaining and light-hearted.

Reading through a few threads recently it dawned on me that many photographers refer to themselves as 'spotters'. I frequently see posts asking things like, "Will this camera be good for spotting?" or, "Where are the best places to spot at such-and-such an airport?". I must admit it does sometimes confuse me and I wondered what others' stances were with regard to this - are you a photog or a spotter?

I must be honest and say that I dislike being called a spotter as I consider myself a photographer. As far as I'm concerned spotters are 'number-crunchers' who collect registrations. Photographers tend to pay little attention to registrations and solely pursue images, although I know many who like to include the reg. in their pictures or aim for a photo of every individual frame in the fleet. So basically there are 'hybrids' - people who do a bit of both. Then of course there are those who are casual photographers or 'snappers' - who simply like to keep a pictorial record of what they've seen.

I think perhaps the best general term for what any of us do is 'enthusiast', and I have no objection as it loosely describes anyone whose interest is aviation. But I have often seem tension between spotters and photographers, who apparently at times get under each others' feet (?). It has been said that both parties aren't true enthusiasts - photographers are artists who just happen to choose aircraft as subjects and spotters are just looking for something to collect; whether it be aeroplanes, trains, buses or supermarket trollies!

So, opinions please. What are you exactly?

Karl

[Edited 2010-03-31 07:18:01]

104 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineJohnKrist From Sweden, joined Jan 2005, 1399 posts, RR: 6
Reply 1, posted (4 years 3 months 3 weeks 3 days ago) and read 6742 times:
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I am a photographer, but also a spotter. Or I count myself as such at least. But I do not collect regs, so per your definition I am not a spotter.
Thing is, I have always called myself a spotter. And to call myself photographer before spotter would suggest that I consider myself to be a pro and have it as my job and primary source of income. Which it is not. I'd say that spotting led me into photography in the first place, and it's also what has driven me to get better and better gear. If not I would still have had my Canon Snappy...
So, I guess I am an enthusiast, which also reflects in my choice of domain www.aviationenthusia.st (do not click, there's nothing there...yet)  

Johnny



5D Mark III, 7D, 17-40 F4 L, 70-200 F2.8 L IS, EF 1.4x II, EF 2x III, Metz 58-AF1
User currently offlinehotplane From UK - England, joined Jul 2006, 1036 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (4 years 3 months 3 weeks 3 days ago) and read 6731 times:

Glad you brought this up Karl, as it's a subject that drives me mad!

In the UK, for as long as I can remember, 'spotting' has only ever involved reading off registrations with binoculars or a telescope and writing them down. So, It really annoys me when someone posts a message like 'Where to spot at LHR', when in actual fact they only want to take photos. Please can people start using the corrcect terms. Rant over!

Oh, and I am definately a photographer!

[Edited 2010-03-31 08:14:03]


?
User currently offlineSilver1SWA From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 4763 posts, RR: 26
Reply 3, posted (4 years 3 months 3 weeks 3 days ago) and read 6699 times:
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My friends prefer to call me an aviation geek or nerd. lol I don't follow regs, just rare or special visits. I like to document the scene at the local airport. I like to get the rarer shots and lately I have become picky of the light. I guess over time I have evolved from aviation enthusiast to aviation photographer.

How someone uses the word spotter doesn't bother me. There's a lot of incorrect terminology used by the aviation enthusiasts. Don't get me started on "finals"...



ALL views, opinions expressed are mine ONLY and are NOT representative of those shared by Southwest Airlines Co.
User currently offlineNicolasRubio From Argentina, joined Sep 2005, 584 posts, RR: 3
Reply 4, posted (4 years 3 months 3 weeks 3 days ago) and read 6700 times:

I consider myself a photographer. I don't care about having pictures of every plane I see, I only want good pictures.

For example, I may get back home from "a day" at the airport with less than 10 pictures in my CF card. I got back from FIDAE with 135 pictures after deleting some. For those reasons, I don't consider myself a spotter, but a photographer.


Nicolas Rubio
www.nicorubio.com



Gripped 7D + Sigma 10-20mm + 17-40L + 50mm f/1.8 II + 70-200mm f/4L IS + EF 400mm f/5.6L + 580EX II
User currently offlineconoramoia From Ireland, joined Oct 2007, 498 posts, RR: 2
Reply 5, posted (4 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 6683 times:

Quoting JakTrax (Thread starter):
It has been said that both parties aren't true enthusiasts - photographers are artists who just happen to choose aircraft

Not exactly, I pretty much developed my photography as a hobby through aviation.I didn't choose photography and then decide to shoot planes.  

Heres how I see it,

Spotter- Someone who goes to the airport to log a reg regardless of wheter it is through binoculars or a camera.

Photographer- Someone who goes to the airport to simply capture moments, I wouldn't call a taxiing plane a ''moment'' but still, it's included.

Quoting hotplane (Reply 2):
So, It really annoys me when someone posts a message like 'Where to spot at LHR', when in actual fact they only want to take photos.

With all due respect maybe thats a bit too much,I mean understand that its annoying but its not something give out about. 


Conor


User currently offlineThierryD From Luxembourg, joined Dec 2005, 2069 posts, RR: 51
Reply 6, posted (4 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 6677 times:
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2 of my passions, namely aviation and photography, have brought me to photographing airplanes.
Whether people call me photographer or spotter isn't really important to me though I always like to clarify that I'm not a reg collector.

Cheers,

Thierry



"Go ahead...make my day"
User currently offlineBottie From Belgium, joined May 2004, 281 posts, RR: 8
Reply 7, posted (4 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 6640 times:

Well ... I'm a Spotographer ...

User currently offline2H4 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 8955 posts, RR: 60
Reply 8, posted (4 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 6640 times:
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Quoting JakTrax (Thread starter):
I must be honest and say that I dislike being called a spotter as I consider myself a photographer.

When I'm doing what I enjoy most, the most accurate term would be 'airplane hunter'. In my opinion, there's nothing better than roaming around a sleepy, out of the way airport, finding a rare or unusual specimen hiding in a forgotten corner, capturing it in a photo, and documenting it for researchers around the world.



Intentionally Left Blank
User currently offlineNIKV69 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (4 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 6632 times:

Quoting JakTrax (Thread starter):
I must be honest and say that I dislike being called a spotter as I consider myself a photographer. As far as I'm concerned spotters are 'number-crunchers' who collect registrations. Photographers tend to pay little attention to registrations and solely pursue images, although I know many who like to include the reg. in their pictures or aim for a photo of every individual frame in the fleet. So basically there are 'hybrids' - people who do a bit of both. Then of course there are those who are casual photographers or 'snappers' - who simply like to keep a pictorial record of what they've seen.

So I am a Toyota Prius!   


User currently offline757MDE From Colombia, joined Sep 2004, 1753 posts, RR: 6
Reply 10, posted (4 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 6615 times:

Based on JakTrax's definitions I'd call myself a "hybrid"


I gladly accept donations to pay for flight hours! This thing draws man...
User currently offlinechuck9941 From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 194 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (4 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 6615 times:

Quoting ThierryD (Reply 6):
2 of my passions, namely aviation and photography, have brought me to photographing airplanes.

couldn't have said it better myself.

although at times I do find it interesting to use the stats here on a.net to see how many times I have captured the same reg.



Oh, it's a big pretty white plane with red stripes, curtains in the windows and wheels and it looks like a big Tylenol.
User currently offlinesoon7x7 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 12, posted (4 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 6604 times:

Quoting NIKV69 (Reply 9):

That depends...do you accelerate uncontrollably...then brake only for airports?...

  

Been chasing planes with a camera since I was 14...forty years later it is a full time job. While on days off I still sit around the local fields with my cameras, however the term "spotting" is not part of my vocabulary. I'm to understand that spotters exist that don't even photo document the aircraft, they just record the movements of them with a monoscope, scanners and all kinds of stuff. To each his own but that I just don't get that...Photospotters I guess are basically just collectors of images that like to swap images, some fun with the camera etc and the comraderie,...wouldn't discredit them as photographers or not. I see A/net as a spotters site more than a photographers site but by a slim margin as the creative aspect in image acceptance has improved. Either way...spotters or not...their are some incredible images on Anet and very talented..."whatever" you call yourselves...g


User currently offlineJakTrax From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2005, 4936 posts, RR: 7
Reply 13, posted (4 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 6585 times:

So it appears we have sub-categories under both 'spotter' and 'photographer'. And we also have a mixture of both. This is gonna get confusing!

At my local I must admit some of the 'spotters' are very strange indeed. I'm not applying this to all spotters but I get the feeling that a good portion simply 'collect' things and aircraft at some stage simply took their fancy. It could just as easily have been speed-boats, buses, stamps or whatever else. What I mean is that I've met many for whom the whole aviation experience seems uninteresting. A example - I once was chatting to an English fella on the old deck at ZRH when an almighty racket started. It just kept going on and on and on and I suspected some sort of old Soviet jet. The thing screamed the place down for what seemed an eternity until it finally poked its nose out from behind pier A. Instantly realising that he didn't need it as a 'frame' (it was an Il-76), the guy packed up promptly and left, saying it wasn't of interest to him. Uh? It was obviously going to pass right by us on its way to cargo and we were talking an Il-76 here - how can any 'enthusiast' fail to find this beast crawling past at close quarters amazing?

For some there's a passion but for others it's just something to tick off or underline in the book; if you see where I'm coming from. Not knocking anyone's methods and indeed each to their own but I think there are varying levels of enthusiasm and various aspects of the hobby which capture people's imaginations.

Going back to those at my local, some of the 'spotting' fraternity seem to have a positive dislike for photographers (they seem to have their own little photographer-free haunts and hiss like snakes if invaded!) and don't consider such people as true enthusiasts. On the flip side some might say exactly the same about them. I always remember a guy at SZG telling me about his dislike for photographers - especially those from MAN. Probably not the best thing to say around three big MAN guys with cameras but we didn't say.....

Karl


User currently offlinenotnam From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2009, 57 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (4 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 6552 times:

I have been fascinated with commercial aviation since childhood and would have loved to get my ATPL after leaving school.

Alas, that never happened and, at the age of 42 have only recently taken up photographing aircraft, my job involves design & technology and I'd like to think that I can (eventually) bring an imaginative & creative element into my photos.

The thing is, and I don't wish to offend anyone, but I cringe at the thought of being called a "spotter". I find myself keeping quite about what I do and even try to keep a low profile around the airports. Don't get me wrong, I haven't got a major complex about it but as far as I'm concerned I am most definitely a "Photographer"


User currently offlineJohnKrist From Sweden, joined Jan 2005, 1399 posts, RR: 6
Reply 15, posted (4 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 6522 times:
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Doesn't matter if you collect regs, photograph or shoot vids, we are considered to be nuts anyway by the general public anyway. So why frown upon peoples activities in the aviation enthusiast group? Some people just don't like freighters, some don't like military birds and some think commercial aircraft are flying coaches, but we are all fascinated by aviation!
So call yourself whatever you want, and don't get upset when someone calls you a spotter when you are out on a photo shoot. Your llife is good if that's your worst problem!



5D Mark III, 7D, 17-40 F4 L, 70-200 F2.8 L IS, EF 1.4x II, EF 2x III, Metz 58-AF1
User currently offlineunattendedbag From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 2323 posts, RR: 2
Reply 16, posted (4 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 6518 times:

Quoting JakTrax (Thread starter):
Reading through a few threads recently it dawned on me that many photographers refer to themselves as 'spotters'. I frequently see posts asking things like, "Will this camera be good for spotting?" or,

I consider that ignorance. There is a difference between a "spotter" and a "photographer". If someone introduced themselves to me as an aircraft spotter, I wouldn't think of them carrying around a $3,000 camera and enough glass to see the space shuttle. I would expect to see a notebook and a pencil.

It's odd that the ones that get perturbed about this are the photographers. When someone says, "which camera is best for spotting?", it isn't the spotters that jump to the front of the line to correct, it's the photographers that quickly let him know that he is using the wrong terminology. why? So far, not one response has been from a true spotter. Are there any around here that frequent the "photography forum"? Maybe a new "spotters forum" is needed. Is there interest?

Quoting Silver1SWA (Reply 3):
Don't get me started on "finals"...

grrrr!! Tell me about it!

Quoting JakTrax (Reply 13):
the guy packed up promptly and left, saying it wasn't of interest to him. Uh? It was obviously going to pass right by us on its way to cargo and we were talking an Il-76 here - how can any 'enthusiast' fail to find this beast crawling past at close quarters amazing?

The same way we in the States can turn our head to a Delta MD-88 or a Southwest 737. Or you could walk away from a Ryan 737 (?). It isn't about the rarity of the aircraft for them, it's whether or not they have seen that particular aircraft or not.



Slower traffic, keep right
User currently offlinespencer From United Kingdom, joined Apr 2004, 1635 posts, RR: 17
Reply 17, posted (4 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 6488 times:

Whether you're a photographer or a number cruncher, the hobby has always been called spotting! Thanks to sites like this we've all decided we're photographers and ditched the whole spotting moniker. A bit like a high jumper saying they're a high jumper, and not an athlete. Just accept photography is part of spotting. Personally I photograph, film and collect anything to do with aviation, including registrations. It's a logging system that I can look back on and it helps with my photography filing. I'm a spotter that loves photography.
Spence.



EOS1D4, 7D, 30D, 100-400/4.5-5.6 L IS USM, 70-200/2.8 L IS2 USM, 17-40 f4 L USM, 24-105 f4 L IS USM, 85 f1.8 USM
User currently offlineJakTrax From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2005, 4936 posts, RR: 7
Reply 18, posted (4 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 6476 times:

Quoting unattendedbag (Reply 16):
The same way we in the States can turn our head to a Delta MD-88 or a Southwest 737. Or you could walk away from a Ryan 737 (?). It isn't about the rarity of the aircraft for them, it's whether or not they have seen that particular aircraft or not.

Yes, but the guy was English - and I guarantee you we don't see too many Il-76s here! Even in Russia they've been rare for a number of years now at commercial airports.

I don't get offended by being called a spotter but underneath I know that's not what I am. As for keeping it under wraps, I can't see why anyone would do that. All my life my friends, acquaintances and people I've met have known about my aviation activities because I've been quite proud to tell them. Some people joke about it being a bit weird but most actually find it fascinating and several people have accompanied me on visits to the airport, often enjoying the afternoon out. It's a pretty broad hobby these days and the numbers doing it are increasing daily. I think attitudes towards it have changed (many people comment on how great the travelling aspect must be) but I also think the photographers want to distance themselves from the 'spotting' side of it as they see this as the original nerdy bit. I must admit, I have come across quite a few 'special' spotters in my time; many of whom I wouldn't like to be seen up town with on a night out!

I think maybe the hobby of 'number-crunching' does attract a few who give others a bad name. We've all met 'em I dare say - 'Mr. 1970s' with his old duffel coat, He-Man lunchbox, ancient scope and about as much conversational skill as a goldfish.....

Then again, I'd be interested to know what 'Mr. 1970s' has to say about photographers.....

Does our hobby still have the ultra-nerdy reputation it used to? I personally don't think so. I think most people secretly are fascinated by flight.

Karl


User currently offlineJid From Barbados, joined Dec 2004, 972 posts, RR: 32
Reply 19, posted (4 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 6476 times:

Quoting JakTrax (Reply 13):
So it appears we have sub-categories under both 'spotter' and 'photographer'.

You have your terminology wrong Karl  

Photographer = Photog
Spotter = Binker

So I would class myself as a photog and someone like Mr Marshall would be know as a Binker who takes the odd photo!!!!



G7EPN is back after 15 years! Operating all Bands 80mtrs -> 70cms QRZ DX
User currently offlinelegoguy From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2006, 3312 posts, RR: 40
Reply 20, posted (4 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 15 hours ago) and read 6369 times:

It depends who I'm talking to. With with family or other aviation enthusiast's, I'd consider myself as a spotter who goes plane spotting.

However when talking to someone not into aviation, I'll refer to myself as a photographer who goes on photography trips around Europe. To someone not interested in aviation, a spotter, or going aircraft spotting, sounds quite geeky where as a photographer on a aircraft photographing trip doesn't sound bad at all. Despite this, all my friends and work colleagues refer to me as a spotter.

On trips, I do like to take a photo of every aircraft I see, and I would recognise aircraft with interesting registrations, so I guess I could be consider a 'Hybrid' or and spotting photographer.

Either way I'm not fussed what I'm called, as long as people realise I don't sit around at airports with a small log book and binoculars.

Dave



Can you say 'Beer Can' without sounding like a Jamaican saying 'Bacon'?
User currently offlineraedervision From United States of America, joined Jan 2009, 63 posts, RR: 12
Reply 21, posted (4 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 12 hours ago) and read 6309 times:
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My definition of spotting are those who document aircraft. When it applies to photography it is only the photograph of the aircraft that is important. Little if any weight is given to foregrounds, backgrounds or other elements in the picture. Aviation photography is about the aircraft and the environment it is in which includes foregrounds, backgrounds, composition and many times telling a story with the aircraft. In the forum not long ago I asked if Anet was a spotting site, a photography site or both. Many including some screeners said it was both but it is not. Anet is a spotting site were some photographs fit inside or are let in the spotting rules. If it were a photography site screeners would use photography rules not spotting rules to screen with. Some spotting rules like centering are very destructive to the art of photography. A lot of people come to Anet for a lot of different reasons but in my opinion they only get part of what they came for. I'd like to see Anet truly become both a spotting and photography site but the only way it could happen is if the screeners use a yard stick instead of a micrometer when it comes to the spotting rules. I think documentation could actually be improved with relaxed spotting rules. Personally I would have just one rule, make sure it's a bloody good photograph. Please don't anyone get me wrong. I think spotting is a good and very positive thing. 50 or 100 years from now these photos will be worth a lot but as most probably already now I'm a photographer or try to be. This is just one guys opinion so no one needs to get all worked up about it. Whatever it is you like to do, keep doing it. Jim

User currently offlinesoon7x7 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 22, posted (4 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 6269 times:

Quoting raedervision (Reply 21):

You hit it on the head pretty much but I do believe the site with its improved acceptablility of "creative" imaging has accepted the "artform" we as aviation photographers see. Personally I like to capture the Architecture of the airframe under unusual lighting...purely an artistic perspective. This concept violates all spotting parameters as I understand them. I once showed some close up photo studies of airliner features to an owner of a hobby store as he told me he too collected airliner photos. When he saw my work, he poopood it an discarded it as rubbish. When I saw his work all I saw was mid day full fuselage booring profiles, one after the next, after the next and again. No care given to the environment, the ugly ramp, etc. It was as that point I learned the difference between the mechanical image of a spotter and the creative image of an aviation photographer...A difference clearly exists...   


User currently offlinemclaudio From Portugal, joined Jan 2005, 170 posts, RR: 0
Reply 23, posted (4 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 6 hours ago) and read 6226 times:

Cheers.
For me things are quite simple.
I'm a spotter who likes to take photos. I'm happy when they are "clean", but sometimes that isn't possible.
It wouldn't make sense to say I'm a photographer because:
First: I don't make money with my photos, contrary to a real photographer that makes money and lives on that.
Second: I don't have ramp access therefore I can't choose the angle that I would like to have, contrary to real photographers who have assigned jobs and can choose the best angles and arrange some nice chicks to pose with the aircraft.
Third: this is hobbie, though it might sound strange to someone where is the fun in collecting airplanes, one can always say the same about someone that collects stamps or empty beer cans.

Take care  



Proudly one of the 6 million Portuguese that support SL Benfica!! Champions 2009-2010!
User currently offlineptrjong From Netherlands, joined Mar 2005, 3904 posts, RR: 19
Reply 24, posted (4 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 6203 times:

Writing down regs of aircraft you've seen has always struck me as a strange activity. Although this is rather subjective, photographing them seems slightly saner to me, and is certainly easier to explain. So like Karl, I don't like to be called a spotter and prefer to be called a photographer (photo hobbyist that is, no suggestion of professionalism).

Karl, I hope you had a good time spotting, er, photographing, in AMS  

Peter 



The only difference between me and a madman is that I am not mad (Salvador Dali)
25 hotplane : This thread seems to have veered of the main issue - the fact that some photographers annoyingly call themselves spotters when they don't even read of
26 Post contains images 2H4 : Well, the flipside of that argument is the thinking that some spotters annoyingly call themselves photographers when they only ever shoot side-ons of
27 Post contains images ptrjong : I remember photographing/hanging around at Utrecht - Soesterberg (UTC / EHSB) (closed), then used by the USAF, one afternoon a long time ago. Bored, I
28 hotplane : At least it's taking a photo of something. You can't call that spotting, that's what I'm getting at.
29 Post contains images a330fanatic : Hi there, I've started photography in 1987 and it's been very recently that I began taking pictures of airplanes in 2007. Anyway, the term of "spotter
30 Post contains links dacman : I shoot and spot, always have. Cheers Dacman www.aeropacific.blogspot.com
31 JakTrax : Paul, You probably met one of the 'funny' MAN reggie-chasers, who do have a reputation of being a bit strange! I've often seen (British) guys abroad a
32 ptrjong : Exactly. Even when you see a plane landing from two miles away, you ask a fellow spotter which one it was and there you go... another one can be tick
33 JakTrax : I've seen it go mad with the advent of ACARS, SBS, etc. When can one underline it in a book? At what point does the 'sighting' become inlvalid? I know
34 Post contains images KPDX : I pretty much disagree with everything said. I don't think a spotter has to write down registrations, etc. They can also spot airplanes in and around
35 Post contains links and images FedexL1011 : I am a photographer/ spotter every chance i get to spot i bring a camera i just got my own "website" so here it is http://www.flickr.com/photos/boeing
36 Silver1SWA : No, that is your agenda. Karl asked for opinions from everyone. This thread is about what people view themselves as...spotters, photographers, enthus
37 raedervision : Spotting photography, artistic aviation photography and creative photography are all very different kinds of photography. There are many very good ex
38 Post contains images spencer : Karl, you don't necessarily need to read the reg off to make it. Back in the day, before the advent of SBS, you could tie up any sightings the followi
39 JohnKrist : To Spot: verb, If you spot something or someone, you notice them. Does it matter if it's through binoculars or camera or even with your bare eyes? I'm
40 spencer : Pre DSLR (when no one thought as themselves as "pros"..;-P ), I don't think I ever heard anyone bring this debate up! I can understand times change an
41 Post contains images a330fanatic : Karl, Yes I forgot to mention that the guy was from MAN. BTW, I like the term of "reggie-chasers" I totally agree with what you said Karl. The real sa
42 Viv : This is the epitome of (the madness of) spotting. I was once in the company of a group of spotters at an airport where a number of vintage aircraft w
43 Post contains images spencer : @Paul. The tying up of callsign, reg, type and time isn't actually strange at all within the spotting world. In fact go to LHR on any given day and, b
44 JakTrax : I must admit I did the same and stopped at a very similar age (16). I think one is easily influenced at that age. Spence, I understand what you're sa
45 hotplane : Ha Ha. Nice one Karl. Message to short blah blah....
46 spencer : No Karl you can't as you have to physically see the ac. Whether there's others that would log from a video seems also strange to me. For me it was alw
47 Post contains images JakTrax : Spence, surely you have to see the registration to put it in a book or whatever? ACARS, etc. I believe can be wrong and there's nothing to say that wh
48 spencer : Karl, I personally have never had any problems with the SBS or ACARS. As to never visiting an airport, I'd agree with you on that. But I don't know an
49 Post contains images PlaneHunter : I can only wonder about some guys' ignorance. Why don't some individuals just enjoy taking pictures instead of wondering about those who write down re
50 Post contains images a330fanatic : Spencer, When I started this hobby back in 2007. I wasn't even aware of that particular activity of writing down reg-numbers. In reality, I'd never se
51 Post contains links and images walter2222 : Same here. I do respect the registration collectors, certainly since I have used a lot of their info (e.g. from Scramble contributors) to trace back
52 spencer : PlaneHunter, I see you collect types and airlines flown too, which is something I also do. I wonder how many photographers do the same? Be honest now.
53 JohnKrist : Spencer, I do and I am very happy to have a few odd ones in my rooster, like the aforementioned IL-76. I do regret that I have not collected the regs
54 66chargerfan : i think alot of us do both, but im not saying that as part of someone else...i just know there are spottertographers (new word i just created) that fo
55 Post contains images lennymuir : Hi Karl, I understand what you are saying but your message doesn't translate beyond the shores of the British Isles. There's also a real age problem a
56 757MDE : I do!
57 Viv : I do not!
58 spencer : 50/50 then, my point made, hahaha!! Spence.
59 JakTrax : For anyone getting a little sensitive here can I remind people that no-one has ridiculed 'spotting' - I simply asked for opinions. Personally I'm just
60 Post contains links and images HrtsfldHomeboy : Spotter: View Large View MediumPhoto © Jason Whitebird Photographer: View Large View MediumPhoto © Wietse de Graaf - AirTeamImages I prefer work of
61 Post contains images dendrobatid : Karl You touch on the crux of spotting. Whilst trainspotters are now a subject of derision, above a certain age a very high proportion of us in the UK
62 Silver1SWA : Here in the US, the same goes for plane spotters and photographers.
63 JakTrax : To be honest I think that shows an enthusiasm - those who sit there for a few hours and watch are obviously fascinated and while perhaps not as enthu
64 dendrobatid : Essentially Karl, trains came first as there was no alternative. It is hard to comprehend now but flying was the domain of the rich back then. I was
65 JohnKrist : I have realized I watch most aircraft through the viewfinder of my camera, so maybe I am less of an enthusiast compared to a spotter since I watch the
66 NicolasRubio : +1 That's the best piece of advice I ever received regarding photography. I think it was my father who told me: "Make sure you don't live your life t
67 JakTrax : Again, this defines your situation but doesn't offer a general picture - do you think that there are some in our hobby who moved from trains, etc. si
68 PlaneHunter : I'm not into Russian types at all and an IL-76 doesn't fascinate me as much as a 777. Tastes are different, passions are different. I would never que
69 JakTrax : But some may say that to be a real enthusiast one must embrace all aspects of aviation. Microlights don't interest me much but I'd be happy wandering
70 JakTrax : Another good example is an American guy I met a few years back who only photographed Boeings as he 'doesn't like Airbus'. He obviously has some sort o
71 Post contains images javibi : I usually punch in the nose people that call me "spotter" j
72 airbus380ct : I wouldnt say i was a spotter , but i do write down information for my records when i get home from doing a days photographing But its a great subject
73 Post contains images ThierryD : Anybody calling you a spotter, most definitely needs to take a look at your portfolio, Javier: ...can't even read the reg on your damn photos!!! Thie
74 Viv : Yes! These lousy shots should be deleted lol.
75 derekf : Photographer or spotter? Does it matter? Why does it matter to some what others think? Do whatever you want to and enjoy it. Don't be saddled or inhib
76 hotplane : I prefer work of the photographers over the spotters on this website. So do I, but it's ok for photgraphers to do 'side on' shots once in a while so l
77 Braniff747SP : No. I'm a spotter and a photographer (with a crap camera) but I don't sit there writing down regs... I simply watch the planes land and take [bad] pi
78 A340Spotter : I am both an aircraft spotter and a photographer, collecting regs since 1992 of anything bigger than a Piper Meridian. Between airliners and bizjets/p
79 cpd : I never write down the registrations - only really take photos. With my zero attention to noting the registrations, I usually have to go begging at th
80 Post contains links and images red750 : I agree with derekf and Braniff747SP I must be taking bad photos - they keep gatting rejected - although I have had a few photos taken 40 or more year
81 spencer : Red750, I opened your CA-25 shot up. Very very nice! Spence.
82 JakTrax : Well guys, looks as if this thread is finally starting to run out of steam but I'm glad to say that, in the main, it's stayed on topic and remained re
83 Post contains images alanelrfc : Aviation Photographer!!! Woop Woop!
84 Chukcha : It is not unusual for words in the language to change their meaning over the course of time. Like it or not, if the majority decide to call 'spotters'
85 Post contains images gabik001 : Hi all I can call me a spotter. I am a aviation fan since my childhood. I didn't know difference between compact and SLR camera but I did between AN24
86 saintex : Who are 'they' and why should it bother you or anybody ? Unless this thread is not a semantic debate, but a thinly veiled putdown of those who do not
87 Chukcha : Just try and read the whole thread carefully, not just one sentence taken out of context. That may answer your question.
88 JakTrax : And just as the thread runs its course without incident we get someone trying to put words in the original poster's (the original poster being me) mo
89 saintex : So what exactly is/was the point of the thread ? Not that it's the first on this same subject, so what 'they' (I have read the whole thread(s) BTW) c
90 JakTrax : In my original post I asked people, "What do you consider yourselves?". Now if that's finding a way to put one party down then I'm sure whichever you
91 Chukcha : Well, maybe I'll try to explain. Because for many here it is a misnomer. People generally don't like being called what they are not. When I was an air
92 Post contains links and images Braniff747SP : Yes. I can't afford some 3K camera plus a 2K lens, and even if I could, I don't think I would buy some great camera. My dad's Leica (film) and the po
93 Post contains images altitude604 : I consider myself a Photographer. But when I'm shooting, I go for aircraft that I personally haven't seen or that I find interesting. Although I will
94 Post contains images JakTrax : I don't collect registrations but oddly enough I'm very good with them due to a pretty photographic memory for letters/numbers. The fact that I only w
95 Post contains images saintex : Since this was in a reply to my post, I'll assume it was directed at me. I'm not the least bit sensitive; as far as the rest of the world is concerne
96 Post contains images Chukcha : With this I will agree . By the way, you have answered your own question, namely, "Who are' they'?" Seems that you knew who 'they' were all along, an
97 Post contains images speedbird19 : A blonde Aviation Photographer
98 AviatorG : My thoughts exactly!
99 JakTrax : Reading through some of the posts we actually have possibly three categories of aviation enthusiast (which I guess is the proper collective term for w
100 Post contains images belfordrocks : Am I the only person who finds the whole classification system a bit silly? It doesn't matter what "sub-branch" of the hobby you're into, "spotters" i
101 JakTrax : A better term is 'enthusiasts' - that's the only real way to generalise. You've got the thread wrong. This isn't a way to try and definitively divide
102 Viv : Not so. While a spotter may also be a photographer and vice-versa, the two terms are not synonomous.
103 spencer : Mods plz lock this up ffs! Spence.
104 JakTrax : We have had many opinions, and this thread has now run its course; as they all do eventually. If anything, it's taught us that we mustn't perhaps gene
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