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Night Photography: High Speed Landing In The Dark  
User currently offlineeksath From United States of America, joined Aug 2004, 1317 posts, RR: 25
Posted (4 years 6 months 2 weeks 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 6088 times:
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Photo results of high speed engine off shuttle night landing (almost pitch darkness)

I was runway side for STS:123 return. It was pitch dark and there was mosquitoes,assorted other bugs,gators and snakes around. It sure was a memorable landing. The photo result of the experience is here:

http://www.atapattu.net/sts123landing/atapattu00.html

At the end of the gallery, I put a day landing shot as a reference to contrast with the night landing.

Sample picture attached.
http://www.atapattu.net/sts123landing/image02.jpg


World Wide Aerospace Photography
8 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineDazed767 From United States of America, joined May 1999, 5498 posts, RR: 51
Reply 1, posted (4 years 6 months 2 weeks 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 5912 times:

Wow great set Suresh! What's up with the Nasa G-II with the nose gear up??

User currently offlinevishaljo From India, joined Aug 2006, 474 posts, RR: 4
Reply 2, posted (4 years 6 months 2 weeks 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 5884 times:

Quote:
Lens: Canon F/2.8 50mm

What lens were you using Suresh  


User currently offlineDazed767 From United States of America, joined May 1999, 5498 posts, RR: 51
Reply 3, posted (4 years 6 months 2 weeks 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 5864 times:

Quoting Dazed767 (Reply 1):
What's up with the Nasa G-II with the nose gear up??

Nevermind looked at one of your photos:

The STA flies at the same speeds, dive angle and approach trajectory as the Shuttle. To do this, the main gear is lowered (not nose gear) and the aircraft engines are thrown into reverse in-flight.


User currently offlineeksath From United States of America, joined Aug 2004, 1317 posts, RR: 25
Reply 4, posted (4 years 6 months 2 weeks 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 5783 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
ARTICLE EDITOR

Quoting vishaljo (Reply 2):
What lens were you using Suresh

This one. I meant focal length of 50mm at the time of the shot. I should have been more clear with the details. Sorry!
I used this:Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8 L USM Lens

USM-Lens-Review.aspx" target="_blank">http://www.the-digital-picture.com/r...-70mm-f-2.8-L-USM-Lens-Review.aspx

Quoting Dazed767 (Reply 3):
Nevermind looked at one of your photos:

Sure. Let me add some more context.

For up and down on each mission, the STS plays an important role as there is an astronaut shooting approaches at the SLF making sure that in case of an abort (for up) or in a landing that the SLF is visible and that there is no rain clouds,fog etc cutting into the safety magins. Launch Control and Mission Control relies on the STA to give real time feedback of weather to supplement what the USAF weather squadron is providing from other sources.

As the orbiter rolls to wheels stop, the STA has traditionally flown above her to check her out and also as a welcome gesture. On this particular mission (currently billed as Atlantis's last), this final gesture was very poignant. As the orbiter's last seconds of flight ticked down, there was a heightened sense of reverence watching the standard operations unfold. Atlantis emerged out of the last heading alignment circle opened air brakes and put her nose down to start her dive for the runway. At the same time, on the corresponding opposite side of the runway threshold, I picked out the STA turning in a slower and delayed version of the shuttle path. So moments after Atlantis whizzed by me, I started tracking the STA coming in right after her in the same flight attitude. The two images you see are her chasing after the orbiter which is still rolling down the runway at this point. Just at about wheels stop (perhaps the final one for Atlantis), N946NA gave her customary salute to Atlantis.



World Wide Aerospace Photography
User currently offlinewalter2222 From Belgium, joined Sep 2005, 1303 posts, RR: 28
Reply 5, posted (4 years 6 months 2 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 5600 times:

Quoting eksath (Thread starter):
At the end of the gallery, I put a day landing shot as a reference to contrast with the night landing.



Lovely pictures! I was almost writing "as usual", but these kind of pictures should not be described that way, they are awesome!

Quoting eksath (Reply 4):
Sure. Let me add some more context.



Thanks for that extra explanation! Most welcome!

Quoting Dazed767 (Reply 3):
The STA flies at the same speeds, dive angle and approach trajectory as the Shuttle. To do this, the main gear is lowered (not nose gear) and the aircraft engines are thrown into reverse in-flight.


Wow! Is this flying, gliding (or falling like a brick)?? That must be a hell of an experience!

Best regards,

Walter



canon 340d ;-) - EFS10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM - EFS18-55mm - EF28-105mm f3.5/4.5 - EF100-400mm f4.5-5.6l is usm - ...
User currently offlineeksath From United States of America, joined Aug 2004, 1317 posts, RR: 25
Reply 6, posted (4 years 6 months 2 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 5499 times:
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ARTICLE EDITOR

Quoting walter2222 (Reply 5):

Thanks Walter. Anytime.

The STA is in kinda of a skydive in which the person is trying to get maximum speed in a forward direction instead of falling straight down. It is amzing to see it hang in the air at altitude. I have some shots of her in flight and I will try and dig them up.



World Wide Aerospace Photography
User currently offlineJeffM From United States of America, joined May 2005, 3266 posts, RR: 51
Reply 7, posted (4 years 6 months 1 week 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 5369 times:

Suresh,
Your images never fail to amaze me. By far the most interesting photos on the site imo!


Jeff


User currently offlineeksath From United States of America, joined Aug 2004, 1317 posts, RR: 25
Reply 8, posted (4 years 6 months 1 week 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 5173 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
ARTICLE EDITOR

Quoting JeffM (Reply 7):
Your images never fail to amaze me. By far the most interesting photos on the site imo!


Jeff

Thank you Jeff. I will try to make it even more interesting as we countdown to the end of the program  



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