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How To Produce A Better Photo  
User currently offlinethepilot From Canada, joined Jan 2010, 5 posts, RR: 0
Posted (4 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 hours ago) and read 4472 times:

Hello everyone, i have a Canon EOS Rebel XS with a 18-55mm and a 55-250mm lens. I am just wondering are there any tips on how to produce that perfect picture and how to edit it so i can get it published on this site. Please help!!!!


From YVR
10 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlinedumbell2424 From United States of America, joined Apr 2009, 918 posts, RR: 2
Reply 1, posted (4 years 1 month 2 weeks ago) and read 4451 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

It's generally said to not shoot in auto mode.

Also, what photo editing software do you have? If none, there are a vast amount of threads related to photoshop and the such.


User currently offlineNIKV69 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (4 years 1 month 2 weeks ago) and read 4451 times:

Buy a Nikon.   


It very easy. If I was you I would start with a static subject in ideal light. Get your settings together and read up on photography. Once you get the first few in you will just start rolling!


User currently offlineGPHOTO From United Kingdom, joined Aug 2004, 829 posts, RR: 25
Reply 3, posted (4 years 1 month 1 week 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 4433 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
DATABASE EDITOR

The perfect picture requires a good understanding of cameras, light and the physical location you are shooting from.

The good news is that if you want photos accepted here, you don't need to be a master, just pick up a few things along the way and be a little patient. Understanding comes with practice (reading too!) and a desire to improve. Never be afraid to fail, as long as you accept failure as part of the improvement process and learn from it. Judge your performance over months, not days - too many are impatient and give up too soon. It's the biggest cause of dropout for any hobby.

Understanding photography can seem quite daunting initially. But like many things, it can be broken down into little pieces which on their own are easily undestood. It's just a question of putting together all the little pieces over time and getting them to 'click' together. How long that takes depends on your natural aptitude, how much effort you put in and how quick you want to progress. I'm quite happy to pootle along picking up bits and pieces slowly over time - it's my hobby, not a job.

A useful 'Panic Mode' group of settings for a sunny day, with the sun on your back and the aircraft in front of you, is to set the ISO to 100, Av (the aperture) to f8.0 and Tv (Shutter speed) to 1/500 second. You should be able to get some keepers from using that.

Editing should be kept to a minimum if possible, the basic principles are:
1. Rotate to get the verticals level.
2. Crop, to get the aircraft centred vertically and horizontally and with as little dead space to left and right as possible.
3. Resize. 1024 x 683 pixels is a commonly used resize value for a Rebel XS.
4. Sharpen. Often a tricky stage to get right. There are many varied opinions on the best techniques and amounts of sharpening to apply.
5. Save as a jpeg at the best quality setting (minimal compression).
6. Upload and wait. If rejected, try and understand what the rejection criteria is telling you - it will help you improve.
7. Don't be afraid to ask for help. There are no stupid questions.
8. Finally, never give up.

There is much more you can do at the editing stage, fiddle around with the light settings, reduce noise, alter the colour balance and more. Every rule is also made to be broken - many great photos break the standard 'rules', but not every photo that breaks the rules is a great one.

Good luck and above all, enjoy it.

Best regards,

Jim



Erm, is this thing on?
User currently offlinemonvillez From United Kingdom, joined Aug 2007, 8 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (4 years 1 month 1 week 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 4407 times:

I have the EOS 1000D which is the european version of this Canon and have managed to get numerous acceptances on Anet. I started from scratch just over 12 months ago having never been near a DSLR.

Research your shoot location and try and shoot from an area that is maybe a bit more unusual.

Shots with the sun behind you light your subject and are far easier to process later. Forget trying to shoot when its overcast and gloomy, unless you have fantastic lenses you will find that the quality is seriously degradated.

Try and find an angle where reflections highlight a certain part of the aircraft and make it stand out, here's one example of mine;

http://www.airliners.net/photo/EasyJ...Airline/Airbus-A319-111/1740781/L/

I use a program called Sonnenstand-Lite which is used with Google Earth, it graphically shows the position of the sun for a given location for a specific day. It really helps you plan where to shoot from.

Get yourself editing software, you will need it! If you're on a budget have a look around on ebay, you will pick up a bargain. Check out the Photoshop workflows on here and elsewhere, there is a lot of experience amongst the photogs on here and these workflows will be the key to having succesful acceptances.


User currently onlinevikkyvik From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 9937 posts, RR: 26
Reply 5, posted (4 years 1 month 1 week 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 4315 times:
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Quoting NIKV69 (Reply 2):
It very easy. If I was you I would start with a static subject in ideal light. Get your settings together and read up on photography.

I have the Rebel XS as well, and that's basically what I did. I read the camera manual, read this forum (and especially the photo critique sub-forum), read some other stuff about photography, and most importantly, practiced taking photos with my camera.

I bought the camera in January I think, and I spent the first 6 months / 3000+ photos learning the camera, and taking shots in all kind of conditions - daylight at first, and then cloudy, evening, night, foggy, hazy, etc.

Didn't even bother uploading till I had a few shots I felt could be edited to A.net standards. Lo and behold, it worked!

It takes some serious patience to learn how to take good shots, but the nice thing is that the results are immediate!



"Two and a Half Men" was filmed in front of a live ostrich.
User currently offlinethepilot From Canada, joined Jan 2010, 5 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (4 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 4165 times:

Quoting dumbell2424 (Reply 1):
Also, what photo editing software do you have?

I use adobe photoshop CS5

I also shoot with raw, will that help or not help me produce a better picture?



From YVR
User currently offlinePsych From United Kingdom, joined Nov 2004, 3048 posts, RR: 58
Reply 7, posted (4 years 1 month 1 week 4 days 21 hours ago) and read 4136 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

I agree with much above: for me you have all you need (that software has at least 1000% more than you need!) and 99% of my photos here were taken as jpeg originals. I would say save RAW for when you have the basics cracked - that is a whole different learning topic (RAW does come into its own in dodgy lighting conditions, but I would say avoid those whilst you are learning to get photos to have a chance to upload).

The two key themes for me - get the good quality light coming from behind you to light up your subject (even better, avoid large parts of the day in summer time where the angle of the sun makes the light very harsh - i.e. stick with morning or later afternoon/evening) and get as close as you can to your subject. Good lighting and a subject that fills the frame in your original will mean you have to do minimal editing anyway.

Beware impatience - it is truly amazing how people have DSLRs and want to upload photos here, but have no concept of photography basics: like lighting; how to influence depth of field and its effect on the photo; the relationship between shutter speed and aperture etc. All this stuff is easy to read up about and thinking 'I have a nice camera now, I will let it do all the work in 'P' (Automatic) and I should expect high quality images' is all wrong. Be in charge of your camera settings!

Paul

P.S. Don't underestimate the impact light quality has on the quality of your final image, and also recognise that high quality (and unfortunately, therefore, usually expensive) lenses really do pay dividends in terms of quality. Know the limitations of what you can expect particularly from your zoom lens - you can experiment to find that out.


User currently offlineGPHOTO From United Kingdom, joined Aug 2004, 829 posts, RR: 25
Reply 8, posted (4 years 1 month 1 week 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 4107 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
DATABASE EDITOR

Quoting Psych (Reply 7):
Don't underestimate the impact light quality has on the quality of your final image

Very true. I went to Fairford yesterday. I always walk the static after the flying finishes in the late afternoon, early evening. The sun is well on it's way to the horizon then and the sky behind your subject is a really deep blue if it isn't cloudy. Disadvantages are you are limited to which side of your subject you can shoot (so I walk the static in the morning too) and long shadows (especially yourself!) getting in your shot. You usually have to bump up the ISO a notch, but ISO 200 is normally fine for this sort of work and not grainy. A stabilised lens, such as the Canon 18-55 kit lens, is a real boon here too.

An example of the 'heads' problem:


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Jim Groom



An example of how blue the sky can be in the late afternoon:


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Jim Groom



Best regards,

Jim



Erm, is this thing on?
User currently offlineccarter757 From United States of America, joined Jan 2010, 28 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (4 years 1 month 1 week 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 4080 times:

I would try to get as much practice as you can with your equipment. Find the sweet spot of focal lengths (sharpest, no imperfections etc) in your lens and aperture sweet spots during different times of the day. It takes time, but once you learn the most you can about your individual equipment, the more you will be able to expand your photography and the easier it will be to successfully adjust settings for varying conditions/locations. Also try not to shoot during the hottest part of the day, usually mid day, as this will introduce heat haze and a sun position that often time won't be ideal for photographs. And plus the morning/late afternoon to evening light make aircraft look amazing in my opinion  

I am not an expert by any stretch of the imagination, but learning your gear and shooting at the right time of the day really go a long way to better photos, and gives you less work often times in post processing.



Best Regards Chris: Nikon D40 ~ Nikkor 70-300 VR ~ Nikkor 18-105 VR
User currently offlineviv From Ireland, joined May 2005, 3142 posts, RR: 29
Reply 10, posted (4 years 1 month 1 week 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 4019 times:

If you do not understand what you are doing, it is unlikely that you will do it well.

Quoting Psych (Reply 7):
t is truly amazing how people have DSLRs and want to upload photos here, but have no concept of photography basics: like lighting; how to influence depth of field and its effect on the photo; the relationship between shutter speed and aperture etc.

If you learn these things first, will serve you well for a lifetime of photography. If you do not learn them, your photography will always be hit or miss in nature.



Nikon D700, Nikkor 80-400, Fuji X Pro 1, Fujinon 35 f/1.4, Fujinon 18 f/2
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