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Planning On Entering Photography  
User currently offlinebueb0g From United Kingdom, joined Jul 2010, 642 posts, RR: 0
Posted (3 years 2 months 4 days 4 hours ago) and read 4057 times:

Hello all,

I do quite a bit of video work and my aviation YouTube channel is fairly popular (www.youtube.com/blueb0g - please take a look, feedback is very welcome!) However, recently, I've felt a bit out of touch with videography and have always felt an attraction to photography.

So I plan on purchasing myself a proper camera soon and embarking on the adventure that is photography... And with any luck having some photos uploaded here!

So I guess my question is, what should I go for? What cameras and lenses would you guys reccomend? Seeing as I already have a video camera I won't be using it for videos so stills is what I'm after. I'm not looking at any definite price range - just so long as it's under £1000 I guess!

What editing software should I invest in? I've got Sony Vegas 9 pro for my videos, so I know the benefit of a good editing software and would like the same with my photos.

And lastly - what tips can you give me with regard to composition and shooting itself?

Thanks in advance!


Roger roger, what's our vector, victor?
7 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineSirThomas From UK - England, joined Jul 2009, 193 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (3 years 2 months 3 days 23 hours ago) and read 4005 times:

Well I won't go too far into things as I'll bore you silly, but if you're going for a Canon (only old farts buy Nikons ) you'll want to buy all lenses in the EF format, as it'll make upgrading in the future SO much easier..

The EF-S lenses are the amateur lenses that you'd expect to get on a lower end SLR.
EF works with all new Canon SLR's high end *and* low end -- EF-S only works on low end ones... So if you upgrade after buying loads of them, you're screwed  

Editing software? - Lightroom and Photoshop. Done.  

Want my advice though? Just avoid anything with the word 'rebel' in the product name  

Tom



Flown On: A319/A320/A321/A332/A333/AT45/734/736/738/744/DH8D/T204/T154/IL62/T134/IL-18/An-24
User currently offlineckw From UK - England, joined Aug 2010, 730 posts, RR: 16
Reply 2, posted (3 years 2 months 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 3980 times:

It's both simple and difficult.

Simple - almost impossible to buy a 'bad' camera these days. You also get pretty much what you pay for, but probably with diminising returns the more you spend (ie. a $2000 camera is not twice as good as a $1000 camera).

Difficult - there so much choice! Very hard to differentiate - one model may have features better suited to you than another, so you really have to try and see what works for you.

I would suggest you stick with a well known make with a good system behind it, so that you have plenty of scope to grow over time. Nikon, Canon, Sony, Pentax will all serve you well and produce models in your price range. Olympus is perhaps best avoided simply becuase their on-goind commitment to DSLRs is in question.

As to tips ... sorry, just too big an area to get into. I'd just say look at lots of pics, here and elsewhere. Find pics you like and then figure out why you like them. I believe you need the picture in your head before you press the shutter. I guess when you shoot video, you have a plan in mind - you don't just randomly point the camera. Still photography requires just as much thought and planning.

Cheers,

Colin



Colin K. Work, Pixstel
User currently offlinecpd From Australia, joined Jun 2008, 4879 posts, RR: 38
Reply 3, posted (3 years 2 months 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 3975 times:

Canon or Nikon will do you a great camera these days, and they have lots of excellent lens options to get you started. They have a big support base and both have good systems with many accessories. It's hard to go wrong with either.

Photoshop Elements is the better choice for software.

And apart from that, you might want to get into a photography course that deals with conventional photography, that will teach you the right things, and the fundamentals of photography.


User currently offlineJakTrax From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2005, 4936 posts, RR: 7
Reply 4, posted (3 years 2 months 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 3949 times:

Quoting SirThomas (Reply 1):
The EF-S lenses are the amateur lenses that you'd expect to get on a lower end SLR.
EF works with all new Canon SLR's high end *and* low end -- EF-S only works on low end ones... So if you upgrade after buying loads of them, you're screwed

Interesting assumption.....

Quoting SirThomas (Reply 1):
Want my advice though? Just avoid anything with the word 'rebel' in the product name

Even more interesting assumption. I'll let you tell those who have thousands of images here taken with Rebels that their cameras are insufficient.....

The problem with thses forums is that the advice you often get is well-meaning, but totally inaccurate (and in some cases worse than useless). Far better to have a low-end body with decent glass than a stunning camera with a turd of a lens.

If the Rebel does the job (and let's face it; it does) then that's the camera to go for. Perhaps not ideal for advanced users but it's the person behind the camera that makes the shot. A good, experienced photographer will get stunning images with any DSLR (yes, Rebels included) - however a total beginner would struggle to get anything like out of a 1Ds III or D3s.

Karl


User currently offlinecpd From Australia, joined Jun 2008, 4879 posts, RR: 38
Reply 5, posted (3 years 2 months 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 3946 times:

Quoting JakTrax (Reply 4):
Interesting assumption.....

Might not have been the most technically precise way to put it, but, think of it like Nikon DX lenses. When you upgrade to a 36x24mm format camera, they are no longer useful unless you want to have about 5mp instead of 12mp.

I don't like that, but some people may think there is no problem with that - so the disclaimer "actual results may vary" applies here.


User currently offlineJakTrax From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2005, 4936 posts, RR: 7
Reply 6, posted (3 years 2 months 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 3917 times:

There are some quite expensive EF-S lenses, so to suggest they are all amateur lenses isn't wise. While it's true that many are indeed budget lenses, some are quite capable of getting good results. A couple of times recently (last five years) I've had an 18-55 kit lens (an EF-S) in my box alongside the Ls as it was useful if I got into in a tight spot. For the few times I needed 18mm it was a fantastic little lens, and to be honest I will probably buy another one before I go to SXM in November.

EF-S lenses will work with models including the 40 and 50D; right the way up to the 7D - hardly 'low-end' cameras. If I was buying a 5D (I or II) then I wouldn't consider EF-S lenses as they won't work, full stop. So similar I believe to the Nikon situation but not quite the same.

I wasn't getting at Tom there, but I do feel his advice was very misleading. Anyone new to photography reading his post would be put off by a Rebel and EF-S lenses, when in fact both are very good for the price you pay. Yes, they have limitations, but that's not the same as being crap (which was almost what was being suggested). They were designed to have those limitations, which is what makes them appealing to beginners.

I actually think the Rebels are ideal cameras to start out with - inexpensive, reliable, and a good introduction to the world of DSLRs. I used an EOS 350D (Rebel XT?) for three years with a budget lens (75-300 USM III) and have hundreds of images here from that combo.

Karl

[Edited 2011-05-30 00:12:31]

User currently offlineJRowson From United Kingdom, joined May 2004, 351 posts, RR: 12
Reply 7, posted (3 years 2 months 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 3895 times:

Quoting SirThomas (Reply 1):
The EF-S lenses are the amateur lenses that you'd expect to get on a lower end SLR.
EF works with all new Canon SLR's high end *and* low end -- EF-S only works on low end ones... So if you upgrade after buying loads of them, you're screwed

The ef-s lenses might be "amateur" but there are certainly some gems amongst them. I've had the ef-s 10-22 for 5 years now and it's superb and lots of fun. Although the IQ can't match my L glass completely, it's a very long way there and more than acceptable for the likes of getting photos on Anet. As for the price of the 10-22, well it'd put it out of the reach of a lot of amateurs and is into L glass price territory.

As for ef-s only working on low end cameras and not suitable for upgrades.....I really wouldn't call my 7D low end, or my 40D before that or my 20D before that.  



James Rowson. Canonite and lover of all things L. JAR Photography.
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