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Best Settings For Bright Light  
User currently offlineevall95 From Australia, joined Aug 2011, 306 posts, RR: 0
Posted (2 years 11 months 13 hours ago) and read 5071 times:

Hi, it is the middle of summer here in Australia so it is very hot and the sun is very bright even in late afternoon. I have been getting many rejections for over sharpened because of the brightness so I was just wondering what the best settings are for shooting in bright light. thanks  

10 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlinedlowwa From Canada, joined Apr 2005, 7328 posts, RR: 30
Reply 1, posted (2 years 11 months 11 hours ago) and read 5059 times:

Hmmm..In your past thirty rejections, I see only two for oversharpened. I don't think that would qualify as 'many'; regardless, the brightness of the sun has little to do with an image being oversharpened. In fact, a poorly (over) exposed image is more likely to look soft than too sharp. If your images are coming out overexposed, simply stop down the aperture, or increase the shutter speed; the latter is what most people would do.

User currently offlinetrvyyz From Canada, joined Oct 2004, 1375 posts, RR: 10
Reply 2, posted (2 years 11 months 11 hours ago) and read 5056 times:

If images are too bright assuming you are using either "A" or "S/Tv" mode, decrease the exposure compensation by a 3rd or 2. Also, shoot raw you will be able to recover more in PP if it is over exposed upto a stop. Increasing the shutter or F number will work for M mode not for the others since your meter is telling the camera to overexpose. Also changing the metering mode could help.

User currently offlinegunship01 From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 28 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (2 years 10 months 4 weeks 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 4974 times:

I've come to find, bright sunlit days will require 1/1600th on a Lufthansa bird and 1/1250 on American Airlines. I let the 100-400MM zoom go full open at F5.6. Seems to work ok.

User currently offlinejaktrax From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2005, 4936 posts, RR: 7
Reply 4, posted (2 years 10 months 4 weeks 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 4962 times:

Too fast a shutter can actually have negative effects on an image. Shooting a regular airliner at 1/1600th sounds a little overboard to me. Still, if f/5.6 gives you the DOF you require that's fine.

Exposure is the only real concern with bright light, while aperture, shutter, ISO, sharpness, etc. have nothing whatsoever to do with it. To a degree contrast is important too. try using stop compensation as suggested, or play around with the contrast.

Karl


User currently offlineNPeterman From United States of America, joined Apr 2009, 181 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (2 years 10 months 4 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 4954 times:

Quoting gunship01 (Reply 3):
I let the 100-400MM zoom go full open at F5.6. Seems to work ok.

 Wow! Your 100-400 will let you get away with shooting at F5.6!? Lucky man you are. Mine lives between 6.3 and 9 to be sharp.

Back on topic, I definitely second the above mentioned idea of playing around with your metering mode. Obviously your metering and shooting modes may need to change depending on your subject's livery (Spot metering + American Airlines can lead to SCARY results    ). At the end of the day, trial and error are king. Oftentimes, Manual will also give you better results if you are getting a good feel for the location, subjects, etc.


Nick


User currently onlinevikkyvik From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 10330 posts, RR: 26
Reply 6, posted (2 years 10 months 4 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 4944 times:

Quoting jaktrax (Reply 4):
Too fast a shutter can actually have negative effects on an image.

Interesting - what sort of effects?

Quoting jaktrax (Reply 4):

Exposure is the only real concern with bright light, while aperture, shutter, ISO, sharpness, etc. have nothing whatsoever to do with it.

For clarification's sake, what exactly do you mean? It sounds counter-intuitive - meaning, of course aperture, shutter, and ISO affect your exposure, but I'm not sure that's what you're saying.



How can I be an admiral without my cap??!
User currently offlineNPeterman From United States of America, joined Apr 2009, 181 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (2 years 10 months 4 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 4935 times:

Quoting vikkyvik (Reply 6):
Interesting - what sort of effects?

While I obviously can't read jaktrax's mind, I have actually noticed that photos I have taken with copiously higher shutter speeds, like 1/1600 -1/3200 will actually seem to be softer than photos taken at more reasonable shutter speeds, like say 1/800. I've also noticed some really strange distortions (really can't seem to find a better word than that) in image appearance- things take on this somewhat flat, almost texture-less character.


Anyhow, just my $.02

Nick


User currently onlineSilver1SWA From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 4858 posts, RR: 25
Reply 8, posted (2 years 10 months 4 weeks 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 4904 times:
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Quoting vikkyvik (Reply 6):
Interesting - what sort of effects?

I'm interested in hearing Karl's explanation. I have often wondered about this. Back when I got my 100-400, I struggled to figure the darn thing out. While I think I have a softer copy, I found that there was a huge learning curve to maximize my results. One of those things I learned through trials was not to use an overly fast shutter speed. I thought at 400mm all I would have to do is go higher on the ISO and get shutter speeds as fast as possible. But I noticed there was such thing as too fast. I scratched my head as shots at 1/1250th and above would cause some weird effects from time to time. Not only would images look softer, but they had the appearance of bad camera shake. Either I've had something wrong with my equipment or there is some truth to Karl's claim. All I know is I'm better off staying in the 1/400 - 1/800 range.



ALL views, opinions expressed are mine ONLY and are NOT representative of those shared by Southwest Airlines Co.
User currently offlineketko2 From Slovakia, joined Sep 2006, 103 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (2 years 10 months 3 weeks 6 days 4 hours ago) and read 4798 times:

I think the camera shake/softness at higher speeds might be due to the mirror shaking right after shutter release. While at 1/400 etc. it becomes negligable, at 1/1600 it might be visible since the camera only has very short time to capture the scene and during that time its shaking. I think in some cases that problem can be eliminated by mirror lock-up, but obviously thats not the case with aviation where the scene is changing constantly.

Regards, Keishi.


User currently offlinelrv890 From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2011, 2 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (2 years 10 months 3 weeks 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 4652 times:

Hi when on the odd occassision in the UK the sun does come out and it is too bright I use a polarising filter to reducing the light by 2 stops
This may help


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