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Camera Shooting Mode  
User currently offlineeskillawl From Sweden, joined Jan 2012, 96 posts, RR: 0
Posted (2 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 hours ago) and read 7355 times:

Hello,

I think it would be interesting to know what camera shooting mode you photographers use, and why.

I use for the most P (Program mode) most because its always "safe", though im about to try out AV (Aperture Priority Mode).


Photo equipment: Canon EOS 60D | Canon 70-200 F4L USM | Canon 18-55 3:5-5:6 |
20 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently onlinevikkyvik From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 10037 posts, RR: 26
Reply 1, posted (2 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 hours ago) and read 7347 times:
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Full manuam (M) mode pretty much exclusively. Nothing else gets as consistent exposures.

Occasionally, if I'm shooting in two directions (like, opposite the sun then into the sun) in quick succession, I'll use M and Av mode, and have the settings for each dialed in, so all I have to do is switch modes between shots.



"Two and a Half Men" was filmed in front of a live ostrich.
User currently offlineepten From Macedonia, joined Sep 2007, 184 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (2 years 1 month 1 week 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 7287 times:

AV here. Always looking for the shortest possible exposure since I have awfully shaky hands.

User currently offlineTomskii From Belgium, joined May 2011, 467 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (2 years 1 month 1 week 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 7281 times:

I use aperture priority (A-Mode on Nikon or AV on Canon) in most of the cases. I'm not as 'developped' yet to be able to do everything manually, so I prefer doing it semi-manual.


Nikon D90 + Nikkor f4.5-5.6 18-105mm + Tamron f4-5.6 70-300mm
User currently offlineviv From Ireland, joined May 2005, 3142 posts, RR: 28
Reply 4, posted (2 years 1 month 1 week 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 7272 times:

With the D700, Shutter Priority.

With the Fuji X Pro 1, Aperture Priority.

With the Bronica ETSRi, Manual.

Most of my shots here are with the D700, a few are with the Fuji.

[Edited 2012-08-11 06:25:33]


Nikon D700, Nikkor 80-400, Fuji X Pro 1, Fujinon 35 f/1.4, Fujinon 18 f/2
User currently offlineDubi From Slovenia, joined Mar 2006, 14 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (2 years 1 month 1 week 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 7268 times:

I shoot in Tv mode and underexpose by 1 level (on bright sunny day). But not always, if sky is a background, then overexpose a bit. In Photoshop then I correct histograms.
Why?
My Canon do not expose properly for A-net, so for a white Cessna to be properly exposed, underexposure of one level (or more) is a must (on sunny day).
When sky is background, then sky is very bright and camera reduces light and reduces an exposure of subject - airplane.
Overexposure is must.

[Edited 2012-08-11 06:34:31]

[Edited 2012-08-11 06:35:18]

User currently onlineteopilot From Italy, joined Jul 2010, 546 posts, RR: 1
Reply 6, posted (2 years 1 month 1 week 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 7251 times:

I generally use Aperture priority on my Canon 450D when it comes to spotting...
For the reason that I follow the aircraft and take a sequence of pictures, where the light may vary, also significanlty at times.
Indeed, it may look a "lazy" mode, I admit it...

But several times it happens that Av is not so helpful in certain situations or does not meet the aim I want.
For example, I change to Shutter priority when I have to deal with pannings or other situations where time is the "ruling principle".
Again, other times neither Tv is helpul... and it's better for you to do things on your own, generally becuase the semi-auto modes fail somewhere... so, with your total control, it is a safer way to achieve the shots you want (because the camera does not know what you have in mind! LOL)
And this for example happens with backlit shots at dusk/dawn, where the auto-exposure is a total failure. So, better to do it on my own!

If we talk about other types of photography, well, things change a little bit! LOL


User currently offlinedarreno1 From United States of America, joined Jun 2010, 224 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (2 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 7214 times:

I'm usually a full manual mode advocate, but have been using Aperture Priority more often lately for the same reason mentioned in a previous post - consistency across sequences. For metering, I've found Center Weighted to be more accurate than Matrix on the D7000 (for the most part). Also, using the AutoExposure Lock button is a nice quick way to lock exposure (similar to using Manual Mode) at those times when constant metering isn't desired.


Nikon D7000 / Nikkor 105mm AF f2.8 / Nikkor 35 f1.8G / Nikkor 50 f1.8D / Nikkor 85mm / Nikkor 300mm f4 AF
User currently offlineJOshu From United States of America, joined Jun 2010, 157 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (2 years 1 month 1 week 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 7195 times:

I utilize shutter speed priority because I can also mess with the ISO. I use full manual about 10% of the time when shooting planes.

User currently offlineckw From UK - England, joined Aug 2010, 742 posts, RR: 16
Reply 9, posted (2 years 1 month 1 week 5 days ago) and read 7114 times:

I use TV for most aviation and boating photography as I find for my style the shutter speed has the most influence on the look of the shot (e.g. prop blur).

Other times (eg. street photography) I use AV as often here its the DoF (or lack of) the makes the shot.

Cheers,

Colin



Colin K. Work, Pixstel
User currently offlineriflex From Portugal, joined Jul 2005, 99 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (2 years 1 month 1 week 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 7090 times:

Mostly I use P, since it's a more safe mode but sometimes I also use Av to control the exposure better.


Nuno Faria
User currently offlineSilver1SWA From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 4817 posts, RR: 25
Reply 11, posted (2 years 1 month 1 week 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 7069 times:
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Fully manual 90% of the time. TV for props or panning. AV for quick shooting without much prep and frequent changes in direction to the light source.

One thing that amuses me is hearing photographers talk heavily about adjusting exposure compensation. If you're heavy on exposure compensation adjustments to chase the proper exposure you might as well be in manual mode! That's like flying a plane using trim controls!

Quoting darreno1 (Reply 7):
I'm usually a full manual mode advocate, but have been using Aperture Priority more often lately for the same reason mentioned in a previous post - consistency across sequences.

Wait, what? You're saying AV gives more consistent results across sequences? I don't think so.

[Edited 2012-08-12 19:37:41]


ALL views, opinions expressed are mine ONLY and are NOT representative of those shared by Southwest Airlines Co.
User currently onlinevikkyvik From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 10037 posts, RR: 26
Reply 12, posted (2 years 1 month 1 week 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 7059 times:
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Quoting Silver1SWA (Reply 11):
If you're heavy on exposure compensation adjustments to chase the proper exposure you might as well be in manual mode!

  

I've actually read many photography articles in magazines where they talk about using exposure compensation. It always kind of puzzles me.

Quoting Silver1SWA (Reply 11):
You're saying AV gives more consistent results across sequences? I don't think so.

I think they mean more consistent without having to change settings. So letting the camera figure out shutter speed for you. Basically what you said too:

Quoting Silver1SWA (Reply 11):
AV for quick shooting without much prep and frequent changes in direction to the light source.

 

Personally, I've just gotten used to changing shutter speeds on the fly as an airplane passes by and goes from frontlit to backlit/silhouette.



"Two and a Half Men" was filmed in front of a live ostrich.
User currently offlinetrvyyz From Canada, joined Oct 2004, 1370 posts, RR: 10
Reply 13, posted (2 years 1 month 1 week 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 7056 times:

Quoting vikkyvik (Reply 12):
Quoting Silver1SWA (Reply 11):
If you're heavy on exposure compensation adjustments to chase the proper exposure you might as well be in manual mode!

  

I've actually read many photography articles in magazines where they talk about using exposure compensation. It always kind of puzzles me.

Exposure compensation is there for a reason.
I don't know how manual mode will give consistent exposure in action photography, as you keep shooting the angle of the sun and if clouds come and go the incident light on the subject would be changing, the exposure would change from shot to shot. (unless you use an incident light meter and change your settings between shots to nail the exposure). The semi-auto modes Av or Tv will change it's parameter according to the change of lighting situation based on the reflection from the subject, making it easier for action.

There is a problem with this because the meter reading is depending on the reflection light (and not incident), if the subject is dark the camera will tend to over expose (trying to make it 18% grey) or viceversa for white subjects, where an exposure compensation would be needed to override the camera to tell it to underexpose upto a stop or the opposite.

Also from camera to camera, even on a default 0EV setting the picture(meter) may give slightly dark or bright image, you would from experience would know how much compensation eg +1/3 or -1/3 even as default.
For example in matrix metering my D7000 would need -0.7ev to nail the exposure while my D5100 doesn't need any compensation for the exact same shooting mode, since most D7000s tend to over expose in matrix mode outdoors(i saw the average or centre weighted is ok at 0ev). All my previous canons I had to dial in from +1/3 to 2/3 ev.

Aslo,if you are using the manual mode with the meter ( center pointing needle of the meter on the viewfinder), the readings/settings would be identical to AV or TV mode. To get a -1ev value, you would need to dial so that the pointer is 1 stop to the left than the centre.

Personally I use shutter priority as I want to freeze the action for aviation. Av for non aviation and Manual for photographs with a flash or multiple flashes. Also, if the subject is still and I have lots of time, I use manual for outdoors also.

[Edited 2012-08-12 20:41:18]

User currently offlineSilver1SWA From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 4817 posts, RR: 25
Reply 14, posted (2 years 1 month 1 week 4 days 16 hours ago) and read 7049 times:
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Quoting trvyyz (Reply 13):

If there's one benefit of shooting in manual frequently, it's that you begin to learn what settings go with different situations. You develop the ability to read a scene and immediately dial in a good starting point.

Personally, when shooting in manual, I don't depend on the camera's meter. If you are chasing the meter in the viewfinder then what is the point of shooting manual? That meter is a guide. Fine tuning by taking some test frames and reviewing the LCD is a good way to get things set up. From there, as long as your light doesn't change much, you can leave everything alone and focus on timing and composition. For more tricky situations with changing light and direction, like I said about, TV and AV are handy. But I find manual mode, especially in tricky environments, can make life easier than the semi-auto modes.

My comment above was related to people who hunt for the right exposure using exposure compensation. They are likely using the same freaking dial as changing shutter or aperture speed (depending on mode) so why not flip it in manual and change those parameters yourself. You're telling your camera to do the same thing, might as well just do it without the middle man!

[Edited 2012-08-12 20:48:03]


ALL views, opinions expressed are mine ONLY and are NOT representative of those shared by Southwest Airlines Co.
User currently offlinetrvyyz From Canada, joined Oct 2004, 1370 posts, RR: 10
Reply 15, posted (2 years 1 month 1 week 4 days 16 hours ago) and read 7044 times:

Quoting Silver1SWA (Reply 14):

I get what you are saying, you get a starting point and then change the aperture or shutter speed based on the light change and using something like the sunny 16 rule.

I have found the semiautomatics work more accurately for me ( I cannot accurately say how may stops are changed when a cloud comes in or sun comes out), I agree in effect doing the EV comp is adding a manual touch to the semi auto mode. But if I have an external light meter or a grey card I would definitely use Manual, since i prefer a predictable method than too many trials and errors,
also for portraits with lights manual will give more reliable results once you get the exposure right.


User currently onlinevikkyvik From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 10037 posts, RR: 26
Reply 16, posted (2 years 1 month 1 week 4 days 13 hours ago) and read 7030 times:
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Quoting trvyyz (Reply 13):
Exposure compensation is there for a reason.

I know, and I used to shoot Av and use exposure compensation. When I switched to Manual, my exposures suddenly became a lot more consistent.

Quoting trvyyz (Reply 13):
(unless you use an incident light meter and change your settings between shots to nail the exposure).

That's exactly what I do, except I don't use the light meter (except as a guide when starting out). I've gotten pretty good at judging how much to increase the shutter speed as an airplane goes from frontlit to backlit/silhouette, for example.

Like I said in my first reply, there are times I use Av. But those times are based more on convenience than the results.

My point about reading articles is I don't see why they don't say "increase or decrease your exposure", and then let the photographer do it however s/he wants. That would make more sense to me.

Quoting Silver1SWA (Reply 14):
If there's one benefit of shooting in manual frequently, it's that you begin to learn what settings go with different situations. You develop the ability to read a scene and immediately dial in a good starting point.

  

Quoting Silver1SWA (Reply 14):
Personally, when shooting in manual, I don't depend on the camera's meter.

  

If it screws up in Av mode (which has happened plenty of times), then it'll screw up the light meter in manual mode as well. "Screws up" isn't the right term, as the camera is doing what it's designed to do. I guess "doesn't deliver what I want" is more accurate.

Quoting Silver1SWA (Reply 14):
But I find manual mode, especially in tricky environments, can make life easier than the semi-auto modes.

Absolutely. Especially around and after sunset, Av mode is horrendous.



"Two and a Half Men" was filmed in front of a live ostrich.
User currently offlinetrvyyz From Canada, joined Oct 2004, 1370 posts, RR: 10
Reply 17, posted (2 years 1 month 1 week 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 6985 times:

Quoting vikkyvik (Reply 16):
If it screws up in Av mode (which has happened plenty of times), then it'll screw up the light meter in manual mode as well. "Screws up" isn't the right term, as the camera is doing what it's designed to do. I guess "doesn't deliver what I want" is more accurate.

Screwup is not the right term as you say.
If you know what the meter is trying to do and depending on the subject you would be able to judge how much negative or positive of the scale you'd want to go. Just by waving the camera from the brightest portion of the secne to the darkest portion you'd see how much variation is there.

But essentially AV,TV with exp comp is equivalent to M as you get to the same point (ie, same F-stop and shutter speed), it is a matter of preference or convenience as to which one is better.
there are some scenarios where absolute M mode is required but not in the case of aviation as we normally don't use strobe/lights etc.

Also, just out of curiosity , have any of you tried shooting with a flash (external) in Av mode for Canon?
The same thing in Nikon produces a different result (atleast when i tried).

[Edited 2012-08-13 10:50:08]

User currently onlinevikkyvik From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 10037 posts, RR: 26
Reply 18, posted (2 years 1 month 1 week 4 days 1 hour ago) and read 6970 times:
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Quoting trvyyz (Reply 17):
But essentially AV,TV with exp comp is equivalent to M as you get to the same point (ie, same F-stop and shutter speed), it is a matter of preference or convenience as to which one is better.
Quoting trvyyz (Reply 17):
Just by waving the camera from the brightest portion of the secne to the darkest portion you'd see how much variation is there.

True, and I do that occasionally.

But instead of trying to judge what the camera meter is going to do, I just judge it by eye and using the LCD. That removes the variable of the camera's decision making. I don't like relying on the camera's meter, since it sometimes displays results that I don't like/understand.

At, say, the In'n'Out by LAX, I'll only need 2-3 shutter speeds over 15 seconds or so. And that's only if I want to shoot the airplane across 170 degrees or so, which I don't always do. Then there's also the factor that my shutter speed may go lower than I want it to go (or in the case of Tv, my aperture may go narrower than I want it to go) when shooting Av.

Anyway, like you said, it's personal preference/convenience. And these discussions are always interesting for me.  



"Two and a Half Men" was filmed in front of a live ostrich.
User currently offlinedarreno1 From United States of America, joined Jun 2010, 224 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (2 years 1 month 1 week 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 6921 times:

Quoting Silver1SWA (Reply 11):
Wait, what? You're saying AV gives more consistent results across sequences? I don't think so.


Across a sequence of continual shooting any slight changes in light from the subject itself or the subject relative to the background can be compensated for on the fly faster than I could in manual mode. Also some aircraft bodies reflect more or less light than others which is taken care of on the fly as well. Of course using Aperture Priority brings other factors into play like how the frame was composed as well as the type and accuracy of metering used at the time to name a few, but I've found it increasingly more reliable as time goes by.



Nikon D7000 / Nikkor 105mm AF f2.8 / Nikkor 35 f1.8G / Nikkor 50 f1.8D / Nikkor 85mm / Nikkor 300mm f4 AF
User currently offlineckw From UK - England, joined Aug 2010, 742 posts, RR: 16
Reply 20, posted (2 years 1 month 1 week 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 6912 times:

It is very much a matter of personal experience - experience perhaps being the key word. I prefer using compensation because it is the quickest way of making changes without taking the camera from my eye. It also means I'm not going to change my key parameter setting (aperture or shutter speed) by mistake. I've no problem shooting manual (didn't have a choice for 20 years or so!) but I cannot think of a single situation where this mode would result in greater consistency or speed over tv/av coupled with use of compensation.

But of course that's just me ... It's as individual a matter as straps, lens choice and all the other variables that make up an individuals style. There so certainly no right or wrong and many ways of skinning this particular cat.

Cheers
Colin



Colin K. Work, Pixstel
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