Sponsor Message:
Aviation Photography Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Night Time Photography Question  
User currently offline777ER From New Zealand, joined Dec 2003, 12285 posts, RR: 18
Posted (1 year 7 months 3 weeks 4 days 16 hours ago) and read 5862 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
FORUM MODERATOR

Hi Everyone

I have a question regarding night time photography.

I find night time/dusk/dawn photography to be really interesting but every time I've tried to take a photo with a fast shutter speed it always come out too dark/can't see the subject.

What suggestions are there in terms of camera setting/techniques for fast shutter speeds during darker hours?

I use a Canon EOS1100D

6 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlinevikkyvik From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 10259 posts, RR: 26
Reply 1, posted (1 year 7 months 3 weeks 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 5840 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting 777ER (Thread starter):
What suggestions are there in terms of camera setting/techniques for fast shutter speeds during darker hours?

Assuming that a flash isn't practical for what you're doing, you have two major options: open the aperture or bump the ISO.

I take a lot of photos in the evening on either side of sunset at 150-300mm, and my settings will typically change like this over a couple hours:

Start at around 1/500, F7.1, ISO160.
1.) I'll reduce shutter speed first, down to around 1/250.
2.) Then open aperture till I get to the max (F4 on my lenses).
3.) Then reduce shutter speed again, till probably 1/100.
4.) Then start bumping ISO, till around ISO1600.
5.) Then reduce shutter speed more, and/or bump ISO. I usually call it a day around 1/20, F4, ISO2000.

I'm not great at panning, so I don't usually go below 1/20 or so, but as I get better at it, that will enable me to keep ISO down for longer.



How can I be an admiral without my cap??!
User currently offlinePHX787 From Japan, joined Mar 2012, 7859 posts, RR: 19
Reply 2, posted (1 year 7 months 3 weeks 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 5730 times:

Careful with your ISO. if you bump it up too high you risk a bunch of noise on your photo.

Personally for me, I'm having difficulty trying to figure out how to adjust the aperture settings and shutter speed on my D3200....the instructions are in Japanese and I'm a slave to my iPad (can't really access much other sites) so what do you suggest I toy with to get a good setting?



我思うゆえに我あり。(Jap. 'I think, therefore I am.')
User currently offlineJKPhotos From Germany, joined Nov 2011, 323 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (1 year 7 months 3 weeks 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 5688 times:

It is easy: use a tripod! And go for standing objects!

I personally would not go up with the ISO as it will produce grain. Noise reduction is a handy tool, but it is not able to do miracles. So with a normal body more than ISO800 will prevent you of getting a decent image quality-wise.


I take my night shots with Manual settings (like my daytime shots too, but at night it is really a must), something like f9 and 3 seconds exposure and always ISO100. If you want the images to be brighter just increase the exposure time.
With a tripod this should not be a problem. And it It is recommandable to turn off the image stabilizer when using a tripod!


Taking night shots without a tripod is of course possible as well (you can find some wonderful shots in the db made this way), but it needs a some experience and a camera which is pretty noise-resistant even with higher ISO's. Some top models obviously are able to do that.


User currently offlinestealthz From Australia, joined Feb 2005, 5724 posts, RR: 44
Reply 4, posted (1 year 7 months 3 weeks 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 5677 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting PHX787 (Reply 2):
Personally for me, I'm having difficulty trying to figure out how to adjust the aperture settings and shutter speed on my D3200....the instructions are in Japanese


This is one of the things that has driven many competent and helpful members away from this forum.

Not questions.. questions that are answered then those answers ignored and asked again...

PHX .. I provided a solution to your difficulties with the instruction manual in another thread!

D3200 Long Exposure-best Settings? (by PHX787 Mar 31 2013 in Aviation Photography)

Was I just wasting my time like others before me?

Cheers



If your camera sends text messages, that could explain why your photos are rubbish!
User currently offlinevikkyvik From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 10259 posts, RR: 26
Reply 5, posted (1 year 7 months 3 weeks 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 5648 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting PHX787 (Reply 2):
Careful with your ISO. if you bump it up too high you risk a bunch of noise on your photo.

True. But with a bright enough exposure, and some practice with noise reduction, you can do pretty well. I have a couple ISO1600 images accepted here. But underexposure + high ISO = a mess of noise.

Quoting JKPhotos (Reply 3):
It is easy: use a tripod! And go for standing objects!

True, and I should have stated that I wasn't referring to that in my reply. 777ER - I was assuming that you were shooting moving aircraft, in which case you can potentially use a tripod, but likely not a 3-second exposure.  
Quoting JKPhotos (Reply 3):
So with a normal body more than ISO800 will prevent you of getting a decent image quality-wise.

I wouldn't say it will prevent it. It may make it more difficult, but I shoot at ISO800+ almost every time I go shooting, due to the time of day.



How can I be an admiral without my cap??!
User currently offlineJKPhotos From Germany, joined Nov 2011, 323 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (1 year 7 months 3 weeks 2 days 12 hours ago) and read 5589 times:

Quoting vikkyvik (Reply 5):
I wouldn't say it will prevent it. It may make it more difficult, but I shoot at ISO800+ almost every time I go shooting, due to the time of day.

You're right Vik, "prevent" was a bit hard, I should've better said it makes it rather difficult.

Like I said there might be differences depending on the camera someone is using.


Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
Night Time Photography posted Thu Nov 28 2002 09:26:33 by Cabbott
The Use Of Flash For Night-Time Images - Is It Safe? posted Wed Feb 13 2013 10:52:28 by Asuspine
Air To Air Photography Question posted Tue Nov 2 2010 22:42:28 by Creep
Night-time And Darker Lighting Shots. posted Sat Jul 10 2010 14:04:47 by Davoos15
South African Airports Photography Question? posted Sat Feb 23 2008 13:35:10 by CaptainDanieL
Night Time Shots posted Fri Jun 30 2006 08:37:54 by 777MechSys
Long Exposure Night Time Departure Shots posted Sun Mar 5 2006 00:15:42 by UnattendedBag
Flight Deck Shots...early Morning/night Time Flash posted Wed Mar 1 2006 11:36:31 by Maddog
Specific SIN Photography Question. posted Sat Oct 15 2005 22:21:24 by AirbusfanYYZ
Extended Night Time Exposures... posted Tue Apr 12 2005 05:09:42 by Maiznblu_757