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In Camera Sharpness  
User currently offlineG-CIVP From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2001, 1321 posts, RR: 10
Posted (1 year 1 month 1 week 5 days ago) and read 3472 times:

Further to the previous question regarding picture styles for a Canon body, we have a follow up question.

Should a photographer ever adjust in camera sharpness (in picture styles) or set it to zero and adjust in post photo processing? I'm aware that if shooting RAW this is immaterial but for jpeg users this will be different.

I'm just interested to see what photographers' opinions are and whether there is a consensus.

16 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineyerbol From Kazakhstan, joined Feb 2010, 219 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (1 year 1 month 1 week 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 3453 times:
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I always keep my in-camera sharpness on default settings and do all post processing with sharpness afterwards.


With best regards from Almaty
User currently offlineviv From Ireland, joined May 2005, 3142 posts, RR: 29
Reply 2, posted (1 year 1 month 1 week 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 3445 times:

Turn it off.
Why? Because it will sharpen things that should not be sharpened, such as the sky.



Nikon D700, Nikkor 80-400, Fuji X Pro 1, Fujinon 35 f/1.4, Fujinon 18 f/2
User currently offlinedazbo5 From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2005, 2910 posts, RR: 2
Reply 3, posted (1 year 1 month 1 week 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 3437 times:

Quoting G-CIVP (Thread starter):
Should a photographer ever adjust in camera sharpness (in picture styles) or set it to zero and adjust in post photo processing?

I always keep it to the default setting. In my opinion, sharpening is better done in post rather than letting the camera do it. You can't reduce it once the camera has applied sharpening but you can sharpen as much or as little as you want in post, and most importantly, selectively.

Quoting viv (Reply 2):
Why? Because it will sharpen things that should not be sharpened, such as the sky.

I couldn't agree more.

Darren



Equipment: 2x Canon EOS 50D; Sigma 10-20 EX DC HSM, 50-500 EX APO DG, Canon 24-105 f/4 L, Speedlite 430EX
User currently offlineRCoulter From United States of America, joined Apr 2007, 550 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (1 year 1 month 1 week 4 days 21 hours ago) and read 3427 times:

I shoot RAW so I actually have mine set at the highest setting, I find it helps me weed out photos on the camera easier by showing blur better on the cameras LCD.

User currently offlinevikkyvik From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 9949 posts, RR: 26
Reply 5, posted (1 year 1 month 1 week 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 3387 times:
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On my Rebel XS, I left it at default (3). On my 50D, I have it set at 4.

Quoting dazbo5 (Reply 3):
I always keep it to the default setting.
Quoting dazbo5 (Reply 3):
Quoting viv (Reply 2):
Why? Because it will sharpen things that should not be sharpened, such as the sky.

I couldn't agree more.

But the default setting on the cameras I've used isn't zero....

I don't find the slight sharpening it may apply to the sky to be an issue, ever. I actually find the reduced sharpening I have to give it after resizing is more of a benefit.



"Two and a Half Men" was filmed in front of a live ostrich.
User currently offlineSilver1SWA From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 4783 posts, RR: 26
Reply 6, posted (1 year 1 month 1 week 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 3380 times:
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Quoting RCoulter (Reply 4):

I shoot RAW so I actually have mine set at the highest setting, I find it helps me weed out photos on the camera easier by showing blur better on the cameras LCD.


     THIS! For LCD viewing purposes, I crank in camera sharpening all the way up. Since I open photos in ACR, all in camera parameters don't apply anyway since ACR has it's own defaults, giving me a clean slate.



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User currently offlineG-CIVP From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2001, 1321 posts, RR: 10
Reply 7, posted (1 year 1 month 1 week 4 days 14 hours ago) and read 3354 times:

Interesting discussion. One emerging issue is the definition of 'default'. As vikkyvik notes, the default setting on Canon cameras isn't necessarily '0' (zero) but set at '3' for standard picture style on a 60D, which has preciptated the question. So as Dazbo5 suggests, should this be dialled down to '0'?

For anyone wishes to contribute further I would be interested to read your thoughts, then I will share my conclusions.


User currently offlinevikkyvik From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 9949 posts, RR: 26
Reply 8, posted (1 year 1 month 1 week 4 days 14 hours ago) and read 3351 times:
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Quoting G-CIVP (Reply 7):
So as Dazbo5 suggests, should this be dialled down to '0'?

There's really no "this should" or "this shouldn't". It's whatever works for you. I found I had to dial up sharpness a bit when I got the 50D, so I did. Works for me.



"Two and a Half Men" was filmed in front of a live ostrich.
User currently offlineckw From UK - England, joined Aug 2010, 732 posts, RR: 16
Reply 9, posted (1 year 1 month 1 week 4 days 13 hours ago) and read 3333 times:

Yes, the default sharpening is not 0 - partly, I suspect, to avoid people being put off by soft images on the LCD (and haven't read the manual).

I think there is some debate as to whether or not it is possible to turn sharpening completely off (ie. many claim even if set at 0, a small amount of sharpening occurs). Again this may be camera specific and possibly related to the strength of the anit-aliasing filter (which varies between models).

In general I'd advocate using the weakest setting on the principle that sharpening can be added, not removed. However, if the object is to avoid post-processing, then the default setting is probably better. With zooms which may be soft at the long end, increasing the strength may be worthwhile.

If post processing is not an issue, then I would ask why not shoot RAW?

Cheers,

Colin



Colin K. Work, Pixstel
User currently offlinedazbo5 From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2005, 2910 posts, RR: 2
Reply 10, posted (1 year 1 month 1 week 4 days 4 hours ago) and read 3285 times:

Quoting vikkyvik (Reply 8):
There's really no "this should" or "this shouldn't". It's whatever works for you.

That's the real key, it's whatever works for you. I'm sure everyone here does things slightly different, but it's the end results that really matters. That's where experience comes in, play around with the settings and use what works best for your personal needs.

Darren



Equipment: 2x Canon EOS 50D; Sigma 10-20 EX DC HSM, 50-500 EX APO DG, Canon 24-105 f/4 L, Speedlite 430EX
User currently offlinesulman From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 2035 posts, RR: 32
Reply 11, posted (1 year 1 month 1 week 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 3227 times:

Funnily enough, a lot of newer workflow and 'digital asset management' (bleurgh) software is doing essentially the same thing these days; even ACR tries to sneak in a little sharpening; one has to remember to switch it off.

Canon DPP is interesting for this as you can effectively experiment with those same presets and see exactly what they do.



It takes a big man to admit they are wrong, and I am not a big man.
User currently offlineSilver1SWA From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 4783 posts, RR: 26
Reply 12, posted (1 year 1 month 1 week 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 3220 times:
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Quoting sulman (Reply 11):
Canon DPP is interesting for this as you can effectively experiment with those same presets and see exactly what they do.

For Canon, your in camera setting when shooting RAW are only relevant to your post process if you're starting your edit using Canon's DPP because it handles the file exactly as it was shot in camera. Otherwise programs apply their own base settings to your files unless set up otherwise.



ALL views, opinions expressed are mine ONLY and are NOT representative of those shared by Southwest Airlines Co.
User currently offlineconinpa From Luxembourg, joined May 2005, 244 posts, RR: 6
Reply 13, posted (1 year 1 month 1 week 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 3138 times:
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Quoting viv (Reply 2):
Turn it off.
Why? Because it will sharpen things that should not be sharpened, such as the sky.

Perfectly agree. In addition, if a wing or stabilizer is oversharpened in-camera, it's very hard to impossible to recover in post-processing.

As a personal taste, I shoot only in RAW and sharpen in post processing.



Patrick De Coninck
User currently offlineG-CIVP From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2001, 1321 posts, RR: 10
Reply 14, posted (1 year 4 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 2763 times:

Just a short note to thank everyone for their contributions. The main conclusion is to turn off in camera sharpening and shoot in RAW if you don't mind post photo processing. The other issue which hasn't been mentioned is the quality of lens which may have a bearing on whether the final image is sharp.

User currently offlineSilver1SWA From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 4783 posts, RR: 26
Reply 15, posted (1 year 4 weeks 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 2741 times:
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Quoting G-CIVP (Reply 14):
The main conclusion is to turn off in camera sharpening and shoot in RAW

   Shooting in RAW is plenty reason to turn ON in camera sharpening because it can be altered or removed in post!

 



ALL views, opinions expressed are mine ONLY and are NOT representative of those shared by Southwest Airlines Co.
User currently offlinevikkyvik From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 9949 posts, RR: 26
Reply 16, posted (1 year 4 weeks 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 2738 times:
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Quoting Silver1SWA (Reply 15):
Shooting in RAW is plenty reason to turn ON in camera sharpening because it can be altered or removed in post!

Or turn it off because it can be added in post.

    



"Two and a Half Men" was filmed in front of a live ostrich.
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