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User currently offlineAirGirl From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 26 posts, RR: 0
Posted (14 years 1 month 1 week 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 1410 times:

As advised, I have been taking pictures on sunny days. However, in getting my pictures back, I am realizing that I have a problem with the shadows cast by the sun. The planes always are casting shadows, sometimes on the same side of the plane as where I am standing and sometimes on the other side. Is it best to shoot when the shadow is on the far side from you? Also the plane itself is "shadowy" from the sun being on the opposite side. Is this just matter of making sure that the sun is behind me?

Thanks for you help,
AirGirl

10 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineNikonman From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (14 years 1 month 1 week 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 1196 times:

AirGirl,

Like you say, you need to have the sun at your back. Also, avoid the time from 1130-1300. The sun is directly overhead. Although, it is possible to shoot at this time, the pictures aren't as clear as they could be.

Good Luck,

Nikonman


User currently offlineScooter From United States of America, joined Jun 1999, 851 posts, RR: 2
Reply 2, posted (14 years 1 month 1 week 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 1198 times:

Whatever...

One of my biggest pet peaves about aviation photography is when people say, "that picture sucks becuase it's the shadow side of the airplane." That's crap. In my book, as long as the image has high visual imapct, it's a good picture.

I've seen some killer aviation photography on the net, and many of the more dramatic/artsy photographers use shadows to their advantage to create a dramatic shot. You won't see much of that here on Airliners.net...this is (for the most part) a standard aviation photography site...most of the pictures here are of the same standard/boring side profiles that have been uploaded day after day after day. I've honestly had my fill of this type of photography. I actually found myself walking through SAN this past weekend getting p****d off because I couldn't find any "Airliners.net" shots - lot's of good aircraft to shoot, but no "winning angles", or no "perfect lighting". And it hit me on the way home...I was going by OTHER people's standards. If I would have shot what I liked, I could have been bringing home a bunch of pics. No offence to Johan, but I realized that I'm shooting for him more than I'm shooting for me. Screw that!!  

What I'm trying to say is, don't let people tell you what is a 'good' shot and what is a 'bad' shot. Yea, the sunny side of an airplane is always good, but don't be afraid of shadows either. Go for impact, not what you think will be accepted by others. Experiment a little...and most importantly, shoot what you like!!!!!!

-Scott
San Diego, CA


User currently offlineFlyf15 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (14 years 1 month 1 week 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 1183 times:

While you are starting out, it is best to have the sun to your back, making the lighted side of the plane facing you.

Now, with that said, some very amazing pictures can be taken in the shadows, but that takes some technique that you will pick up over time.

Most of all, before you take each shot (if you have time), take about 4 nanoseconds   to look at the photo and think about how it will turn out. If it looks good, press that button!



User currently offlineGranite From UK - Scotland, joined May 1999, 5568 posts, RR: 64
Reply 4, posted (14 years 1 month 1 week 20 hours ago) and read 1178 times:
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Hi

I tend to agree with Scooter.

Sometimes I get fed up with side on shots and like to try different angles wherever possible, shadow side or no shadow side.

Click for large version
Click here for full size photo!

Photo © Gary Watt


The above shot is not the best, but it's the kind of thing I like. Sorry about the quality.

Regards
Gary Watt
Aberdeen, Scotland


User currently offlineNikonman From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (14 years 1 month 1 week 6 hours ago) and read 1156 times:

Garry,

Hey dude, that's a cool shot! Out of curiosity, do you have a full body shot from that elevated angle?

Nice shot man  

Nikonman


User currently offlineGranite From UK - Scotland, joined May 1999, 5568 posts, RR: 64
Reply 6, posted (14 years 1 month 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 1141 times:
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Hi

Yes, I think I do.

I will have a look at the weekend and e-mail it to you.

I saw it in Toronto and my first ever A330-200!!

Regards
Gary
Aberdeen, Scotland.


User currently offlineFlyf15 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (14 years 1 month 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 1148 times:

Gary, how did you get so high up to take that shot?

User currently offlineGranite From UK - Scotland, joined May 1999, 5568 posts, RR: 64
Reply 8, posted (14 years 1 month 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 1149 times:
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Hi

I am 50 foot tall  

No, you get that shot from the terminal car park which is on the roof.

Regards
Gary Watt
Aberdeen, Scotland


User currently offlineTriStar From Belgium, joined Oct 1999, 848 posts, RR: 1
Reply 9, posted (14 years 1 month 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 1133 times:

Scooter,

I couldn't agree with you more. I posted something about this a while ago, asking if -by any chance- there was an interest in aviation photography from "different" angles. No-one replied, so I sort of concluded I was a bit singled out on Airliners.Net concerning the matter. It's nice to see there are others who think alike.

Would you mind posting a few links to the "killer aviation photography" you mentioned? I've come through a bunch of sites during the last couple of months, but rarely do I see a "special touch" or "original approach" to taking aircraft pics. I, for one, would love to get up close to more aircraft and take partial photos, which I feel tend to look quite dramatic. Not to mention impressive.

Thanks in advance for your reply.

BTW, I love that shot of Canada3000, Gary.

Best regards,

TriStar.


User currently offlinePropfreak From Switzerland, joined Mar 2000, 157 posts, RR: 8
Reply 10, posted (14 years 1 month 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 1125 times:

hi everybody
interesting topic. I agree with Scooter. well, I would call myself the classic (boring) shooter, even I do enjoy taking pics in different/dramatic/unusual angles from time to time. It also depends, I believe, what you want to do with the pictures (i.e. if you want to exchange the pictures you are taking or if they are only for yourself) but as has been said before, airliners.net is rather for the straight-forward, 90°-angle-shooters. Posted a couple of "against the light shots" before but they were rejected because they were too dark...
I think the most important thing is that you enjoy what YOU do, and not what other people are thinking about it.
Olav


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