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Removing Window Glare?  
User currently offlineRolo987 From United States of America, joined Aug 2001, 293 posts, RR: 0
Posted (11 years 9 months 1 week 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 5599 times:

I have a few pictures from my last vacation that I wanted to upload. The problem is, on a few of them there is window glare. Is there a tool on Photoshop that can fix this or is there no way to remove it at all?

20 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineCkw From UK - England, joined Aug 2010, 713 posts, RR: 16
Reply 1, posted (11 years 9 months 1 week 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 5555 times:

There's no tool specifically for this purpose, but very careful use of the clone brush might work in some cases - but if the glare is extensive, it is likely that your retouching will look worse than the original glare.

Cheers,

Colin



Colin K. Work, Pixstel
User currently offlineRolo987 From United States of America, joined Aug 2001, 293 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (11 years 9 months 1 week 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 5498 times:

If there really is no way to remove it, then how do you take pictures from the terminal without getting that window glare?

User currently offlineCfalk From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (11 years 9 months 1 week 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 5502 times:

Rolo987,

The best solution is to not take pictures through windows. I'm not joking. If there is only a small part of the picture that is affected, a little cloning work might do the trick, as Colin said, but for the most part, forget it.

Charles



User currently offlineCkw From UK - England, joined Aug 2010, 713 posts, RR: 16
Reply 4, posted (11 years 9 months 1 week 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 5480 times:

If taking shots through glass can't be avoided ...

1 - get as close to the glass as possible. Ideally, use a lens hood and have it right up against the glass.

2 - make sure you are at right angles to the glass

3 - try using a jacket or similar to make a hood around your head and camera - sure people will look at you strangely, but, hey, if you're a photographer/spotter you'd best get used to it!  Smile

Cheers,

Colin



Colin K. Work, Pixstel
User currently offlineLewis From Greece, joined Jul 1999, 3592 posts, RR: 5
Reply 5, posted (11 years 9 months 1 week 13 hours ago) and read 5428 times:

Won't a polariser help?

User currently offlineCfalk From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (11 years 9 months 1 week 9 hours ago) and read 5415 times:

Yes, a linear polarizor will certainly help, at a cost of about 2 stops, and a little extra time taken setting up your shot, as you have to align the filter.

But the ideal is still to find someplace where you can shoot without glass in front of you.

Charles


User currently offlineHkg_clk From Hong Kong, joined Jan 2001, 999 posts, RR: 2
Reply 7, posted (11 years 9 months 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 5392 times:

Besides getting as close as possible to the glass, you should try to stand in a position such that you've got a blank wall/piller etc behind you which will create less reflections on the glass.


See my homepage for a comprehensive guide to spotting and photography at HKG
User currently offlineBrianhames From United States of America, joined Feb 2000, 795 posts, RR: 2
Reply 8, posted (11 years 9 months 5 days ago) and read 5384 times:

Yes, next time, ask the captain to turn the plane around so you can get the side of the airplane with no sun coming in the windows...

Or you could get a lens hood, those help.


User currently offlineMark2102 From United States of America, joined Nov 2001, 350 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (11 years 9 months 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 5350 times:

I had that same problem when I take pics through a terminal window. This same thing happened to me a few weeks ago at EWR while taking a picture of the plane I was flying. It was early in the morning when there is that horrible sunglare and it was right on the side where it made it impossible to take a picture. So i kneeled down so I would not get my own reflection through the glass and I positioned my camera close to the window and angled it so the glare was in the sky. I used the monitor on my camera to see where the glare is. It was not one of my best pictures though. I agree with everyone who says it is best to take pictures without glass.

Mark


User currently offlineSerge From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 1989 posts, RR: 2
Reply 10, posted (11 years 9 months 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 5337 times:

Rolo987: Would you be able to show us the photos? Or me (cessnapilot88@hotmail.com)? It would help to see if its removable..

regards,
Serge  Smile/happy/getting dizzy


User currently offlineRolo987 From United States of America, joined Aug 2001, 293 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (11 years 9 months 10 hours ago) and read 5310 times:

I will post them on here sometime this weekend or early next week.

Alex


User currently offlineBA From United States of America, joined May 2000, 11151 posts, RR: 59
Reply 12, posted (11 years 9 months 10 hours ago) and read 5300 times:

Like everyone has been saying. The only tool that would work is the Clone Tool. However that is even limited. It will only work to a certain extent.

If the glare is small, then you'll probably be able to get rid of it. If it's large, then you'll be spending too much time removing it, plus people will be able to tell that you edited that area because it's large.

Glare is difficult. Basically you're going to have to stick with it. If it's small, you might get away with it by using the Clone Tool.

Paint Shop Pro 7 has a Scratch Removal Tool which I found to work excelent not only on scratches, but removing dust, and other particles.

It might POSSIBLY work decently on glare. I am not too sure though.

I'm not sure PhotoShop has the Scratch Removal Tool. You might want to look into it.

If it doesn't, then download the 30-day trial of Paint Shop Pro and try it out.

Good luck.

Regards



"Generosity is giving more than you can, and pride is taking less than you need." - Khalil Gibran
User currently offlineRolo987 From United States of America, joined Aug 2001, 293 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (11 years 8 months 4 weeks 5 hours ago) and read 5278 times:

Here is one of the photos:

http://www.airliners.net/addphotos/big/ready/P1010008.JPG

Alex


User currently offlineMirage From Portugal, joined May 1999, 3122 posts, RR: 15
Reply 14, posted (11 years 8 months 4 weeks 5 hours ago) and read 5298 times:

You can't be serious, do you expect that photo to be accepted here?

Luis


User currently offlineBA777 From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2001, 2167 posts, RR: 7
Reply 15, posted (11 years 8 months 3 weeks 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 5274 times:

Im sorry, but theres a whole list of things that i can see in that pic that seriously hurts its chances  Sad

BA777


User currently offlinePUnmuth@VIE From Austria, joined Aug 2000, 4162 posts, RR: 54
Reply 16, posted (11 years 8 months 3 weeks 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 5272 times:

Rejection reasons: badangle, badmotiv, badcentered and badscan.
See te line running through the sky from left to right? If you should have more of those please check them for being leveled, the plane not being obstructed by gates, fences or any other awul looking stuff. And for a beginner it would be much easier to get photos in a acceptable quality if you take them with the sun in your back. So check your possible uploads for those issues and upload them only if they meet the criteria, this would help the Q and also the speed of the screening process.
peter



-
User currently offlineRolo987 From United States of America, joined Aug 2001, 293 posts, RR: 0
Reply 17, posted (11 years 8 months 3 weeks 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 5243 times:

But what about this picture?

http://www.airliners.net/addphotos/big/ready/P1010017.JPG

Really, the only major problem is window glare.

Alex


User currently offlineFly-K From Germany, joined May 2000, 3140 posts, RR: 52
Reply 18, posted (11 years 8 months 3 weeks 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 5222 times:
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I've had a few photos rejected recently for window glare. Problem is, under these conditions (aircraft taking off) I had little time to take measures against the window reflections - maybe the rule shouldn't be so strict in this case.

http://airliners.net/procphotos/rejphoto.main?filename=IST_takeoff_150702_4.jpg

http://airliners.net/procphotos/rejphoto.main?filename=IST_takeoff_150702_3.jpg

Konstantin



Once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been...
User currently offlineAndrewmorrell From United States of America, joined Jul 2002, 73 posts, RR: 3
Reply 19, posted (11 years 8 months 3 weeks 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 5220 times:

There's a really great graph on the "Add Photos" page that is an acceptance matrix. It shows your chances of getting any particular photograph accepted based on the major criteria which distills the ANet mission.

I don't think that there's a single point of failure here. Yes window glare is an issue, but there are other issues at work as well, including all of the things mentioned above by Peter.

What kind of equipment are you using? Are you doing *any* digital enhancement?

andrew



Go Blue!!!
User currently offlineTomh From United States of America, joined May 1999, 960 posts, RR: 2
Reply 20, posted (11 years 8 months 3 weeks 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 5223 times:

There are multiple problems here, even in the later images. I'll stick to the glare problem. If you are shooting through glass, in addition to the good tips already given, you should ensure that you are wearing dark clothes. If you have light-colored hair, or like myself, a distinct lack of it, you should wear a dark hat too.

Next time you shoot through glass, if you see indistinct glare, move your body around. If the glare changes or moves, then you are the source of the glare-wear darker clothes. Also, when in the terminal, don't position yourself with a bright wall to your rear, and avoid the lights from restaurants and newsstands.

Now, I know Colin is very well experienced, but even if he sent one to me for free, you won't see me with a dark hood around my head and camera at ANY airport these days. Though technically, it sounds like the best idea of all.

That 150702_4 takeoff shot-maybe if it was taken on a better day, with less smog and haze.

Keep shooting!


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