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How To Acheve Good Cockpit Shots  
User currently offlineBA777 From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2001, 2167 posts, RR: 7
Posted (11 years 6 months 2 weeks 3 days ago) and read 3360 times:

Hi Guys,

I might have the oppourtunity soon to visit a place where there are lots of planes parked that i can go on (no it's not an airport  Wink/being sarcastic a maint. base actually:P)

Chances are, that ill be using my Minolta SLR with my 50mm own, goes to about f1.7 ish i think.

I will hopefully also be using a tripod, so is it best to let the shutter do itself and choose the widest possible aperture?

I'll be using either Reala or Superia 200 - Any comments or tips at all?

Thanks

BA777

17 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineRes From United States of America, joined Jul 2000, 417 posts, RR: 1
Reply 1, posted (11 years 6 months 2 weeks 3 days ago) and read 3349 times:

The time I took shots in a cockpit, my first shot was too fast and I didnt catch all the CRT screens (due to frame rates). Almost like taking a shot at a television - you get those bars in the photo. Good thing I have a digicam so i could see my mistake and take another one.
This is the only realy problem i had...maybe its just me.
-Tim



FLY NAVY
User currently offlineBA777 From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2001, 2167 posts, RR: 7
Reply 2, posted (11 years 6 months 2 weeks 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 3331 times:

Res,

I would usually use a digicam, but my Dads got it, and he's on a boat in the middle of the Atlantic atm, and might not be back in time  Wink/being sarcastic http://www.challengetransat.com btw.

How do you avoid the "bars"

BA777


User currently offlineShawn Patrick From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 2607 posts, RR: 17
Reply 3, posted (11 years 6 months 2 weeks 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 3329 times:

The thing that makes cockpit shots difficult is the fact that there usually isn't much light available.

What you should do is use the lowest F-stop you can (f/1.8 or whatever) so that enough light will get in to the camera. Use 1/60 shutter speed or faster, otherwise you'll get motion blur. ISO 200 film should be good enough to get a good cockpit shot.

Take a look at one of mine:


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Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Shawn Damphousse


ISO 100, f/2.2, 1/30

Good luck!

Regards
Shawn


User currently offlineBA777 From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2001, 2167 posts, RR: 7
Reply 4, posted (11 years 6 months 2 weeks 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 3326 times:

Shawn,

Ill have a play with the ISOs, the lowest f is actually f1.7  Big thumbs up

Is that digital, it sure looks like it  Wink/being sarcastic

BA777


User currently offlineShawn Patrick From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 2607 posts, RR: 17
Reply 5, posted (11 years 6 months 2 weeks 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 3309 times:

Yep, that's my Sony F707 digital cam. I love it!

User currently offlineBA777 From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2001, 2167 posts, RR: 7
Reply 6, posted (11 years 6 months 2 weeks 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 3309 times:

Thought so, hopefully ill have the flexability of a digi for mine, only ISO200 though, but that'll be fine.

BA777


User currently offlineLuchtzak From Belgium, joined Dec 2001, 468 posts, RR: 8
Reply 7, posted (11 years 6 months 2 weeks 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 3306 times:

Hi,

maybe another tip: set your camere to auto-flashmode when taking pics e.g. whilst landing.

Here are 2 examples!


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Photo © Bart Noëth
View Large View Medium
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Photo © Bart Noëth



kind regards,

luchtzak
http://www.luchtzak.be


User currently offlineShawn Patrick From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 2607 posts, RR: 17
Reply 8, posted (11 years 6 months 2 weeks 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 3301 times:

I always hate using the in-camera flash because the light is just too harsh. If you can, put a piece of tissue or something over the flash. It will diffuse the light and make it a little softer.

User currently offlineEGGD From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2001, 12443 posts, RR: 36
Reply 9, posted (11 years 6 months 2 weeks 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 3298 times:

Yup you can either sync-flash or just take a slow exposure and play steady hand game or get a tripod..

User currently offlineBA777 From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2001, 2167 posts, RR: 7
Reply 10, posted (11 years 6 months 2 weeks 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 3289 times:

Yeah, ill def. be using a tripod, no doubt about it.

BA777


User currently offlineCx flyboy From Hong Kong, joined Dec 1999, 6533 posts, RR: 55
Reply 11, posted (11 years 6 months 2 weeks 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 3278 times:

If I was flying I wouldn't want someone behind me with a flash taking photos on short finals!!

User currently offlineLuchtzak From Belgium, joined Dec 2001, 468 posts, RR: 8
Reply 12, posted (11 years 6 months 2 weeks 2 days 10 hours ago) and read 3255 times:

Yes,

forgot to say I set my autoflash to low.

If I was flying I wouldn't want someone behind me with a flash taking photos on short finals!!

If you ask, they don't mind.

greetings,

luchtzak


User currently offlineCkw From UK - England, joined Aug 2010, 713 posts, RR: 16
Reply 13, posted (11 years 6 months 2 weeks 2 days 10 hours ago) and read 3251 times:

1 - be wary of using the lens wide open .. depth of field will be very small - too much may be out of focus - go for a longer shutter speed instead.

2 - you could well be working with a contrast range beyond the ability of film/sensor to capture correctly (bright outside the windows, dark inside) - be careful your exposure settings are not over influenced by the light outside. If in doubt, bracket your exposures.

3 - Flash - problematic these days as it tends to reflect off the CRT screens which doesn't look pretty. If you have the capability, bouncing the light off the cockpit roof can help

Cheers,

Colin



Colin K. Work, Pixstel
User currently offlineShawn Patrick From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 2607 posts, RR: 17
Reply 14, posted (11 years 6 months 2 weeks 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 3228 times:

1 - be wary of using the lens wide open .. depth of field will be very small - too much may be out of focus - go for a longer shutter speed instead.

Also note that the shorter the focal length, the larger the DOF. You could probably get away with f/1.7 if you have, say a 17mm or 28mm lens.

Shawn


User currently offlineBA777 From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2001, 2167 posts, RR: 7
Reply 15, posted (11 years 6 months 2 weeks 2 days 1 hour ago) and read 3209 times:

It's a 50mm lens, so.....

BA777


User currently offlineBoeingholiday From Austria, joined Apr 2002, 456 posts, RR: 4
Reply 16, posted (11 years 6 months 2 weeks 2 days ago) and read 3199 times:

Yes, light may be our biggest problem. Here's one shot without a tripod.


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Photo © Markus Wechselberger




If I was flying I wouldn't want someone behind me with a flash taking photos on short finals!!

I asked the pilot and he said: "Oh yes, please!"  Big thumbs up Depends on the crew.




User currently offlineN949WP From Hong Kong, joined Feb 2000, 1437 posts, RR: 1
Reply 17, posted (11 years 6 months 2 weeks 2 days ago) and read 3202 times:

Given the relatively tight confines of a cockpit, a 50mm will not be wide enough if you intend on shots like this:

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Photo © Alexander Jonsson


In general, I find a 17-35 zoom much more useful for cockpit shots. With the 50, you may be limited to shooting clusters of instruments only.

'949


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