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What Does The Photographer Mean By This...  
User currently offlineHustler From United States of America, joined Jun 2001, 325 posts, RR: 1
Posted (12 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 12 hours ago) and read 4648 times:

When you look at the comments of this photo the photographer says:

note turbulence in intake


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Photo © Pedro



Is that little white stream of air what turbulance looks like in the air. I'm not sure I understand what he is saying. Can someone explain?

Thanks,
...Hustler.

25 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineIkarus From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2001, 3524 posts, RR: 2
Reply 1, posted (12 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 11 hours ago) and read 4614 times:

I think he's trying to point out the condensation in the engine intake. It has nothing to do with turbulence.

Regards

Ikarus


User currently offlineBruce From United States of America, joined May 1999, 5067 posts, RR: 15
Reply 2, posted (12 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 10 hours ago) and read 4541 times:

Isn't it dangerous to stand that close to an engine operating at 100% thrust? I mean, he could have gotten sucked in!!!!


Bruce Leibowitz - Jackson, MS (KJAN) - Canon 50D/100-400L IS lens
User currently offlineLindy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (12 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 10 hours ago) and read 4531 times:

He wasnt that close. He was probably standing close to the nose gear of this aircraft and used little zoom on it. If I remember correctly. Safe distance to stand by working engine on 737 is 13 feet I dont know whats the distance for 747.

Rafal


User currently offlineTrnsWrld From United States of America, joined May 1999, 962 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (12 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 10 hours ago) and read 4512 times:

Yeah it may be 13 ft at idle, but what about up to 100% throttle?? Remember that engine isnt just turning at idle. I really have no idea about safe distances from the engine while running, but its gotta be a lot more than 13ft from a full throttle RB211. Correct me if im wrong.


User currently offlineRaggi From Norway, joined Oct 2000, 1005 posts, RR: 1
Reply 5, posted (12 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 4450 times:

simply amazing picture!

raggi



Stick & Rudder
User currently offlineHeavymetal From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (12 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 4421 times:

I think the picture sucks.





 Wink/being sarcastic  Big thumbs up



User currently offlineAak777 From Qatar, joined Apr 2001, 284 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (12 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 4414 times:

If air flows fast enough it could turn turbulent, but that stream line looks laminar to me. Any way I'm sure that the engine intake is designed to prevent turbulent flow

User currently offlineVC-10 From United Kingdom, joined Oct 1999, 3708 posts, RR: 34
Reply 8, posted (12 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 4385 times:
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When an engine is run at high power the pressure drops in the intake and any excess moisture in the air condenses out.

At high power the danger area extends to 25 feet


User currently offlineHeavymetal From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (12 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 4349 times:

A question for either the photog or anyone who has ever been in this arraingement....from the presumed distance the photographer was from the intake, would he be feeling more than a gentle breeze blowing past him and into the engine at this point?




User currently offlineVC-10 From United Kingdom, joined Oct 1999, 3708 posts, RR: 34
Reply 10, posted (12 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 6 hours ago) and read 4293 times:
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If he felt any sort of breeze, he would be too close.

User currently offlineAirplanetire From United States of America, joined May 2001, 1809 posts, RR: 2
Reply 11, posted (12 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 6 hours ago) and read 4256 times:

What keeps the aircraft from going anywhere when it is going at 100% thrust? I don't think the things that go under the wheels would do it. Also, how is the aircraft not damaged from not going anywhere? I would imagine that the landing gears are under a lot of strain with engines running at 100% thrust and not having the plane go anywhere. But then again, landing gears are probably pretty strong because they can withstand a plane landing and that has to be a lot of pressure on them. Amazing picture though!

User currently offlineFly_yhm From Canada, joined Dec 2000, 1681 posts, RR: 10
Reply 12, posted (12 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 5 hours ago) and read 4212 times:

Well Heavy Metal I happen to think its blow Smile/happy/getting dizzy


Where will you spend eternity? He,s more real then you think!!!!!
User currently offlineHkgspotter1 From Hong Kong, joined Nov 2005, 0 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (12 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 4194 times:

For a close up you could get tied to a tow truck  Nuts

User currently offlineHmmmm... From Canada, joined May 1999, 2109 posts, RR: 5
Reply 14, posted (12 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 4176 times:

Going full blast but not moving must put some part under a lot of strain. Anybody know what point on the plane they use for securing the beast?


An optimist robs himself of the joy of being pleasantly surprised
User currently offlineHmmmm... From Canada, joined May 1999, 2109 posts, RR: 5
Reply 15, posted (12 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 4149 times:

After thinking awhile, it's probably much simpler. I suspect the wheels brakes, perhaps augmented by chocks, do the job.


An optimist robs himself of the joy of being pleasantly surprised
User currently offlineT prop From United States of America, joined Apr 2001, 1029 posts, RR: 1
Reply 16, posted (12 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 4137 times:

Most likely only the #3 engine is running at max power. The brakes have no problem keeping the aircraft in place.

T prop.


User currently offlineVC-10 From United Kingdom, joined Oct 1999, 3708 posts, RR: 34
Reply 17, posted (12 years 1 month 2 weeks 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 4068 times:
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Only one engine is run a high power at a time, incidentally it is not full TO power but a proportion of it. While this engine is at high power another engine at the other side will be at fairly high power in an effort to balance the the a/c.

The a/c is normally restrained on the brakes only. When I run engines at LHR I taxi the a/c to r/w 23 block 40, set the park brake and away you go.


User currently offlineBabaero From Philippines, joined Jan 2002, 468 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (12 years 1 month 2 weeks 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 4052 times:

Running engines at full power is no problem.

Chock the wheels and fill the fuel tanks.

Most a/c with correct amount of fuel will stay put. May move a little but no problems.


757 now theres a story...


User currently offlinePanman From Trinidad and Tobago, joined Aug 1999, 790 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (12 years 1 month 2 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 3902 times:

VC-10, do you do the trick that the cola airline do (or at least they did for the 4 months last year that I worked with them). Ask permission from the tower to do an idle power engine run. Then when an aicraft taxis past crank it up to whatever thrust you need and then back to idle before the aircraft passes.??

The first time I saw the cert engineer doing that I laughed - it was in one of their 747-200s (the one that makes you sleep).

Some easy cryptic clues there as to the airline and which one of their 747-200s they used by the way - the hardcore reg spotters should work it out easy enough.

PaNmAn


User currently offlineSkymaster From Denmark, joined Apr 2001, 228 posts, RR: 1
Reply 20, posted (12 years 1 month 2 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 3885 times:

When making engine test on fighters att full poewer and afterburner you lower the hook and connect it to a heavy wire which is firmly attached in concrete. The place is normally surrounded with blast shields. A grid is placed on the intake to secure the ground crew. At least this is the way we do it in Denmark on our F-16´ s.
I will upload a pricture of it.
Skymaster


User currently offlineJeffM From United States of America, joined May 2005, 3266 posts, RR: 51
Reply 21, posted (12 years 1 month 2 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 3825 times:

Skymaster,
Back when I used to turn up F-4s and F-14's, I could run both engines up to around 80% with just the brakes depending on the fuel load. You would get some creep over that. To go to full Military (Burner) Chains and the hold back cable were required. Do they make intake screens for airliners? I've never seen one installed.

Jeff


User currently offlineG-CIVP From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2001, 1338 posts, RR: 10
Reply 22, posted (12 years 1 month 2 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 3744 times:

You don't flog an engine at 100% for long as it increases engine wear.

User currently offlineBruce From United States of America, joined May 1999, 5067 posts, RR: 15
Reply 23, posted (12 years 1 month 2 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 3698 times:

"most a/c with the correct amount of fuel will stay put".......What does having a full fuel tank have to do with the plane not moving?


Bruce Leibowitz - Jackson, MS (KJAN) - Canon 50D/100-400L IS lens
User currently offlineG-CIVP From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2001, 1338 posts, RR: 10
Reply 24, posted (12 years 1 month 2 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 3659 times:

It is a touch unlikely that an engine run is perfomed with all fuel tanks full as in the photos, providing downwards inertia! If the wheels ain't chocked, its gonna move!!

User currently offlineSudden From Sweden, joined Jul 2001, 4130 posts, RR: 6
Reply 25, posted (12 years 1 month 2 weeks 18 hours ago) and read 3536 times:

How much fuel you have in the tanks is not vital in these situations.
Set the breaks and throttle up. That does it.



When in doubt, flat out!
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