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Long Exposures During Night Shots.  
User currently offlineBO__einG From Canada, joined Apr 2000, 2771 posts, RR: 18
Posted (13 years 10 months 4 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 2513 times:

Hey, I was at YYC yesterday and stayed till sun went down.
Unfortuneatly I tok like 10 shots of A340s and so on.
But the thing was that I tried using Long exposures.
My question is:
What is the proper way of Exposing aircraft at night?
and HOW long is it necessary to hold the exposure button on the camera before the shot gets over exposed.

(heres what Ive done and Im not sure if it was correct. So Im concerned that I may of fryed my pictures that I took on that evening.
I had a ISO200 Film (negative) and Tried long exposure on a airliner at 3 seconds, 5 seconds, 10 seconds, and 15 seconds to "test" how The picutres would turn out.
I think I set the F"" to (5.6 or 2) I also did NOT use a Flash. And I used a 75-150mm Nikon lens if that helped.
Was any of the things I did good enough to make the picutres come out all nice and sharp?
Whats the recommended time elasp before things get ugly?

Bo Kim --(-<==


Chance favors the prepared mind.
14 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineThomasphoto60 From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 4020 posts, RR: 26
Reply 1, posted (13 years 10 months 4 weeks 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 2415 times:

Hi Bo Kim,

As for night time photography, well you will need the following basic items;

1 A steady support, namely a tripod.

2 A shutter release cable (back in the day, things were so much simpler when it came to these cables, they would screw into the shutter release and cost $2-$5, now you need a higher tech solution.. a cord that attaches to a 'remote control socket' and costs $15-$45..).

As for expousure, well it all comes down to good old fashioned experimenting. I normally set my aperture to f8-f11 just to start, and play around with the shutter speeds, normally from 5 secs on up to 8 mintues. Again there are no hard and fast rules with this type of photography.

Good luck,

Thomas






"Show me the Braniffs"
User currently offlineBO__einG From Canada, joined Apr 2000, 2771 posts, RR: 18
Reply 2, posted (13 years 10 months 4 weeks 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 2405 times:

Tomas.
Holy crap.. 8Minutes?!!
Do you use some sort of a automated timer attached to the remote?
Cuz I cant stand just to Press 1 small 2cm button for that long..
Yes I also do have a tripod, but I did not bring it to YYC> I thought that i wouldnt be spending so much time there where night would fall.
But thanks for your thoughts...  Big thumbs up
On Tuesday Jan 30. I'll get my picts developed.
First time ever, Im gettin my picts developed at a Pro shop. Infact 2 PRO shops..
I'll do my best to get them to a.net asap so you and others would see from my latest trip.

Damm, I took my bike all the way up there cuz my parents were working, and boy it was one hell of a 45km trip.(with help of Ctrain) Took only a few hours and the entire trip lasted to closely 10hours. Unfortuneatly I woudl of been like 10km shorter if my favorite spot was open which wasnt as far, but damm winds made the farthest part of airport avail for photo--..
And I almost got into trouble with security at the Air Canada Cargo that day..I was just sitting there fixing up my lens and taking pictures when a person came and asked me to leave or else..
And food was alright, Tim Hortons and Manchu WOK!!!!

Bo-----



Chance favors the prepared mind.
User currently offlineThomasphoto60 From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 4020 posts, RR: 26
Reply 3, posted (13 years 10 months 4 weeks 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 2400 times:

Most(if not all) cable releases have a locking mechanism, so once you begin you exposure, you twist the lock in place and let the camera do the rest, so you can walk away sit in a warm car, have a beer, hit on a Stew or what ever makes you happy!

Thomas



"Show me the Braniffs"
User currently offlineGranite From UK - Scotland, joined May 1999, 5577 posts, RR: 63
Reply 4, posted (13 years 10 months 4 weeks 22 hours ago) and read 2400 times:
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Hi all

I have been thinking of a shutter release cable for a while now. I am not really into night photography but when there was a lunar eclipse a few weeks ago it got me thinking again.

So, is it worth investing in?

If anyone is interested, please download the following Zip file from my temp site:

http://members.xoom.com/worldwings/misc/hk1997.zip

This is a shot of Hong Kong harbour at night (makes nice wallpaper)

I used a tripod but no shutter release cable. I just pressed the shutter slowly and let the camera do the rest.

Regards
Gary Watt
Aberdeen, Scotland


User currently offlineBO__einG From Canada, joined Apr 2000, 2771 posts, RR: 18
Reply 5, posted (13 years 10 months 4 weeks 11 hours ago) and read 2378 times:

Doin it and seeing it..
Ooh, my it is a nice picture of Hong Kong..
Im not really that into cables as I also dont do that much night photography unless for somereason..
Also for night involving long exposures, do you need a flash?? or can you do it without a flash?

Bo-



Chance favors the prepared mind.
User currently offlineAKE0404AR From United States of America, joined May 2000, 2535 posts, RR: 45
Reply 6, posted (13 years 10 months 4 weeks 11 hours ago) and read 2384 times:

There is a flash technique which Thomas described once but I don't remember what it was excactly about.
Maybe he can help on that one.

Flash at night:

I try not to use it and try to operate with the excisting light.

This picture was taken at f8/20sec 400ASA with a tripod and no flash.



Click for large version
Click here for full size photo!

Photo © Vasco Garcia



Like it was said earlier, go out at night,try to find the settings which is working best for you.

Vasco



User currently offlineBO__einG From Canada, joined Apr 2000, 2771 posts, RR: 18
Reply 7, posted (13 years 10 months 4 weeks 10 hours ago) and read 2374 times:

Cool shot.
20econds eh.
I dont see any movements in your picture during such an elaspe..

But yea, I will go for a try with long expore and experiment the ways,
Tomorrow I will test out what I have learned.


Bo



Chance favors the prepared mind.
User currently offlineThomasphoto60 From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 4020 posts, RR: 26
Reply 8, posted (13 years 10 months 4 weeks 10 hours ago) and read 2374 times:

I often use a technique that is referred as a 'flash and blur'. Where the shutter is set a speed usually between 1/15 down to 2 or 3 seconds. This is a tricky technique, in paticular when trying to judge the correct exposure in a darkened enviroment. Even with today's 'smart flash and camera combos' it takes a while to perfect. This technique is not always apperciated at first, because of the blur. But after one studies the image, one apperciates the sense of motion, while freezing the main subject.

Flash can be used effectively with other types of night time photography. I suggest reading up on the subject. But if you want to combine a long night exposure with a flash you will still need some steady support.

I'll link a photo here later, that I took of a wing walker at night guiding out a 727. This photo is not in the database, as the main subject is not the aircraft.

Thomas



"Show me the Braniffs"
User currently offlineAndyEastMids From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2001, 1025 posts, RR: 2
Reply 9, posted (13 years 10 months 4 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 2383 times:

I've shot quite a few night shots at East Midlands over the years...

1. There's no substitute for experimentation. Do not expect all your night shots to come out right. Expect to throw away a fair proportion, especially if you shoot slide film that is not as tollerant of over/under exposure as is print film.
2. I find the camera's meter is quite useful (in a way), but I almost always over-expose by at least one stop, and often two stops, using the camera's built in exposure compensation system. There's something call reciprocity failure (or something like that) which says that for exposures over about one second you've got to add extra time (or apperture) because film will not follow the normal exposure rules.
3. You need a good tripod. Forget about hand holding. Avoid jabbing sharply on the shutter button. And ideally, you don't want to be holding the shutter button down all through a long exposure, even if the camera is on a tripod (see next).
4. Most modern cameras have exposure times up to 30 seconds or even more, when set on one of the auto exposure modes. Use these modes, along with the aforementioned over exposure compensation, to set an exposure. If the camera has a self timer, use this too. Set in on self timer so that you can press the shutter button and leave it for ten seconds (or whatever) before the shutter is released. That way, the camera will have steadied after the shutter has been pressed before the exposure starts.


As I said first up: Night photography is a bit hit and miss, especially with slides, but with some practice you get to know - darker areas obviously need longer exposures but also more over exposure. The results can often be worth the effort.

Two other things to be aware of:

1. Airport flood lights will often put a yellow cast on the results. You need a special filter to combat this, or some creative work with software to sort it after you get the results.
2. Star filters make interesting high-lights out of point light sources, which can be attractive to an extent. Don't over do it though - the effects wear thin after a while in my opinion.

Hope this helps,

Andy @ East Mids


User currently offlineThomasphoto60 From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 4020 posts, RR: 26
Reply 10, posted (13 years 10 months 4 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 2367 times:

This is the 'flash and blur' technique to which I referring to earlier.

http://www.freeweb.pdq.net/t2m@pdq.net/wingwalker727.jpg


The increase in grain (noise) is not uncommon for night shots, also keep in mind that I was using an iso 200 Fujuchrome(Pre-Sensia) film at the time.


Thomas



"Show me the Braniffs"
User currently offlineAKE0404AR From United States of America, joined May 2000, 2535 posts, RR: 45
Reply 11, posted (13 years 10 months 4 weeks 5 hours ago) and read 2358 times:

This is the exact photo I was takling about, Thomas.
You refered to it a couple of months ago, as well.

Nice and definitely an interesting shot. You described it a little. Can you go into more details?

Bo Kim wrote:
======
"Cool shot.
20econds eh.
I dont see any movements in your picture during such an elaspe.."

Believe it or not, there was no movement during this time period.

I have others where you can see the movement and that could create a definite cool effect to the picture, if used the correct way.

Vasco





User currently offlineThomasphoto60 From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 4020 posts, RR: 26
Reply 12, posted (13 years 10 months 4 weeks 5 hours ago) and read 2366 times:

Checking over my notes, I can not locate this shot, but if I remember correctly, I shot this with a Canon T-90 (possibly an F1) 24mm 2.8 lens and Vivitar 285 flash held off camera via a conecting cord and high to the left.

I measured the avaliable light from a handheld meter (The camera's meter would have been fooled into over exposing the dark background, thus ruining the shot). Deciding that I wanted an f8 to an f11, with the hand light meter I measured that a 5-8 sec exposure would suffice. This particular shot was at 7 sec at around f11 (with a lot of bracketing). I turned the flash's power down to match as closely as I could to the ambient lighting. Of the 15 expousres made of this subject, only 3 were useable. As I said this is a tricky type of shooting, and takes a lot of practice, even with today's advanced flashes.

I was not aware that I had mentioned a 20 sec expousre as BO Kim had said. If I did then it was a mistake on my part.

Thomas



"Show me the Braniffs"
User currently offlineAKE0404AR From United States of America, joined May 2000, 2535 posts, RR: 45
Reply 13, posted (13 years 10 months 4 weeks 4 hours ago) and read 2361 times:

Thomas,

the 20sec were a part of BO Kim's comment to my photo...........

Thanks for the details. I will try it sometimes!

Vasco


User currently offlineBO__einG From Canada, joined Apr 2000, 2771 posts, RR: 18
Reply 14, posted (13 years 10 months 3 weeks 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 2335 times:

Ahh.. Flash and Blur eh.. Sounds like tuff stuff to me.
I'll see what I can do about night photography as it IS very tricky.
Thats amazing that such an airport like BOS had no movement during that time. period..
Very nice indeed, well keep it up man. and to the rest of you folks, nice material and .
I encourage you guys too keep working on the night skills. I like to see more results from the night works if they ever get on a.net.
Cheers,


Bo Kim..



Chance favors the prepared mind.
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