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Canon Dslr Users Your Settings, Once And For All  
User currently offlineLGW From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (11 years 1 month 4 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 9167 times:

Hi all,

This is aimed at Canon DSLR users be it D30, D60 10D etc.

I have read many comments of different photographers settings they use and some get a little confused (don't they Joe  Smile/happy/getting dizzy)

So, once and for all I would like all Canon DSLR users to tell us :-

1) What metering mode they use i.e evaluative, etc

2) Quality, RAW, Large fine, etc

3) Parameters -1 0 +1 on Sharpness, Contrast and Saturation

4) White balance setting

I know this may be boring, basic etc but id be interested to get a definative list of different photographers favoured settings, so if you would be so kind to answer il shut up  Smile

Ben Pritchard

29 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineCraigy From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2001, 1118 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (11 years 1 month 4 weeks 5 hours ago) and read 9092 times:

1) What metering mode they use i.e evaluative, etc
Partial metering (the circle in the middle). Since recently switching to this, my exposures have been mostly spot on with a little compensation when needed. When I used the full evaluative I was constantly changing the compensation as the colour of the sky changed (blue sky to white cloud) and the level of the sun rose or the position of the plane in the sky changed..

2) Quality, RAW, Large fine, etc
Is there another option other than RAW?  Big grin

3) Parameters -1 0 +1 on Sharpness, Contrast and Saturation
Since changing sharpness tothe lowest (off) it's been GOODBYE TO JAGGIES. Since all the previous shots I took were on RAW, I can go back and reprocess them if I want to with this new parameter. (see question #2 above).

4) White balance setting
Always auto - the 10D seems to cope well.

Regards,
Craig.


User currently offlineKingwide From United Kingdom, joined Aug 2001, 838 posts, RR: 19
Reply 2, posted (11 years 1 month 4 weeks 5 hours ago) and read 9085 times:

Not sure what this is actually worth but:

1) Metering mode: Errm All of 'em including manual with an incident light meter. Usually leave it on evaluative but often end up dialing in 1/3 stop over / under exposure. Partial is useful to me for some of the motorsport stuff I do in the pit lane and Center weighted is always a great fall back since I grew up shooting with Center Weighted meters.

2) RAW or Large Fine - depends on the subject / client requirements etc. I have to say I am becoming a fan of RAW although the D30 is dog slow in RAW mode.

3) Params: Well when I'm shooting JPEG it's +1/+1/+1. I also Cfn 3 to remap AF to the * button.

4) White Balance: Shooting RAW - auto because it doesn't actually matter. Shooting JPEG - whatever makes the most sense. Auto a lot but I do use the other settings to suit the conditions.


J



Jason Taperell - AirTeamImages
User currently offlineCkw From UK - England, joined Aug 2010, 731 posts, RR: 16
Reply 3, posted (11 years 1 month 4 weeks 5 hours ago) and read 9081 times:

On the D60 & 10D I shoot RAW, leaving all settings and white balance at default/auto as these can be changed as required at processing

Exposure: evaluative - on D60 exposure compensation seldom required, on 10D often required depending on conditions - I usually shoot a few test frames and use the histogram to fine tune.

Occassionaly use partial, but seldom for aviation. In tricky situations, sod the meter, I guess and use the histogram to fine tune  Smile

Cheers,

Colin



Colin K. Work, Pixstel
User currently offlineTZ From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2003, 1085 posts, RR: 53
Reply 4, posted (11 years 1 month 4 weeks 3 hours ago) and read 9050 times:
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Colin said: "Occassionaly use partial, but seldom for aviation. In tricky situations, sod the meter, I guess and use the histogram to fine tune."

As far as I'm concerned, this is the best advice anybody could ask for! As always, Colin speaks sense while keeping both feet on the ground!  Smile/happy/getting dizzy

TZ



TZ Aviation - Aeropuerto de los Banditos Team Images
User currently offlineMarco_polo From United States of America, joined Jul 2001, 324 posts, RR: 18
Reply 5, posted (11 years 1 month 3 weeks 6 days 20 hours ago) and read 9004 times:

D30 Settings:

Typciall on Program Mode, Continuos shooting (3FPS), Single Shot Focus, Center Weight Metering, ISO 200, JPEG Fine Mode,

10D Settings:

Same as above except change color space to Adobe RGB and Continuous Focus.

-Jay


User currently offlineBA777 From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2001, 2175 posts, RR: 7
Reply 6, posted (11 years 1 month 3 weeks 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 8968 times:

What about you Mr. Pritchard??

Henry


User currently offlineLGW From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (11 years 1 month 3 weeks 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 8961 times:

Sorry, I have just come out of the corner and taken my dunces hat off...

My settings are

1) Evaluative (most of the time)

2) I use Large fine JPEG

3) Sharpness -1, Contrast 0 and Saturation +1

4) White balance setting - Always AWB although I used to use the Sun WB when it was sunny but have read a few things and done a few tests and now use AWB all the time.

How about you Henry? Enjoying your DSLR?

Ben Pritchard


User currently offlineJoakimE From Sweden, joined Nov 2001, 408 posts, RR: 7
Reply 8, posted (11 years 1 month 3 weeks 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 8950 times:

For my D30,

1) What metering mode they use i.e evaluative, etc
Evaluative, at least I think that's what I'm using, always forgett to check that up  Big grin
Usually underexpose by 1/3 or 2/3 too, easier to fix an underexposure than over, if you can't get it perfect in the first place that is  Smile

2) Quality, RAW, Large fine, etc
Always RAW, no reason not to shoot RAW

3) Parameters -1 0 +1 on Sharpness, Contrast and Saturation
Since I use RAW, I don't mess with that in the camera  Big grin

4) White balance setting
AWB, lazy and can change when converting the RAW file, love RAW  Big grin


User currently offlineBA777 From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2001, 2175 posts, RR: 7
Reply 9, posted (11 years 1 month 3 weeks 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 8901 times:

Ben,

Haven't quite got it yet, things will be moving this week (thats a note for you Mr. Lewis  Big grin)

How big do RAW files come out on the D30??

Henry


User currently offlineEGGD From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2001, 12443 posts, RR: 35
Reply 10, posted (11 years 1 month 3 weeks 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 8894 times:

Henry - How the hell can you afford £700  Nuts

User currently offlineLGW From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (11 years 1 month 3 weeks 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 8897 times:

Henry,

Fine JPEG about 1MB and RAW about 2.3-2.5MB

Ben Pritchard


User currently offlineWietse From Netherlands, joined Oct 2001, 3809 posts, RR: 55
Reply 12, posted (11 years 1 month 3 weeks 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 8889 times:

Evaluative, RAW, settings are changed in Breezebrowser. (dont like Phase One)

Wietse



Wietse de Graaf
User currently offlineThomasphoto60 From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 3938 posts, RR: 22
Reply 13, posted (11 years 1 month 3 weeks 4 days 4 hours ago) and read 8830 times:

Well now a few questions from a 'to be' DSLR shooter. After getting a ton of requests from clients and perspective clients, I've decide to take the DSLR plunge next month with the purchase of a Canon 10D. This of course will compliment my 3 other Canon SLRS and lenses. I'd like to preface this by saying that I have photographed in every format from Linhof to Leica and have little problems adjusting to the different film and camera sizes, however digital does seem a little daunting, especially in the field where events happen awfully fast. So I guess my first question would be.......How steep is the learning curve from film to digital? What is Breezebrowser and similar programs and are they included in the most DSLR packages? The FPS (frames per second), from what I have read, unlike a traditional film cameras with a motor drive attached, one can not expect to burst off a series of shots in the same manner, is that correct? I see from the consensus that RAW/Large Fine are the overwhelming file preferences, if that is the case how many images can one get on say a 256MB card?

I never have cared too much for auto modes, preferring manual for full control. So with that said, are there any manual DSLR shooters out there?

I realize that with anything creative you must learn by doing and figure out which is best for you, still any tips, hints, ect..would be appreciated.

Thomas



"Show me the Braniffs"
User currently offlineSkymonster From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (11 years 1 month 3 weeks 4 days 4 hours ago) and read 8815 times:

Thomas,

Answering your questions in order:

Learning curve - its not the camera, its the post-processing. As far as the photography is concerned, using a (say) 10D is pretty much the same as using a film-based Canon EOS

Breezebrowser - is Canon's software that processes RAW files and converts them into TIFs, JPEGs and the like. It comes with the camera. There are alternatives - Zoombrowser, Phase One - which you have to buy.

FPS - You can shoot a sequence of up to around eight or nine (can't remember which) pics in much the same way as you can with a conventional camera. Whilst shooting a sequence like that, the camera writes to the buffer. Once the buffer is full you can't shoot as the camera needs to write the pictures out to the flash card.

RAW files - around 50 ish on a 256k card.

No doubt others may add more detail.

Andy



User currently offlineCkw From UK - England, joined Aug 2010, 731 posts, RR: 16
Reply 15, posted (11 years 1 month 3 weeks 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 8808 times:

I agree with Andy - the beauty of the 10D is that if you have used a Canon SLR, you'll have no problem using this - it has its quirks, but no more than you would expect from switching between differnt film cameras.

The 10D offers full manual control, if that's what you want (I quite often shoot in full manual). The big plus for the "creative" photographer is the ability to review the image you've taken (much like using Polaroids to set up a shot) with the bonus of a histogram analysis of the scene allowing you to fine-tune exposure in a very precise fashion. Put it this way, when working with studio set ups, I've abandoned my flashmeter preferring to use a few test shots and studying the histograms.

The learning curve - well you will need to acquire some proficiency with Photoshop or similar, but if you are already familiar with post processing scans, the transition to digital is pretty painless - and you will certainly appreciate the freedom from grain and noise issues!

Cheers,

Colin



Colin K. Work, Pixstel
User currently offlineThomasphoto60 From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 3938 posts, RR: 22
Reply 16, posted (11 years 1 month 3 weeks 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 8800 times:

Thanks guys,

Indeed I am familiar with Photoshop, as I have some 392 pics here. While I have used several digi p/s cameras I am familiar with the view screen on the reverse but a DSLR is a whole different animal.

Several years back I have used the Frosher Pro Backs on my older F1s and Mamyias when I was doing studio work so I am familiar with the Polaroid analogy.

Again thanks,

Thomas



"Show me the Braniffs"
User currently offlineCraigy From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2001, 1118 posts, RR: 0
Reply 17, posted (11 years 1 month 3 weeks 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 8793 times:

Thomas,

To add to what Andy posted,

You can shoot at about 3.5 fps up to 9 shots in RAW mode and the camera will buffer them. However, once the camera has written enough data from the buffer to the memory card (a couple of seconds or so), you can take a few more shots.

In the UK, the camera comes packaged with Canon's Zoombrowser, Remote Capture, File Viewer/Converter and Photo Stitch software plus a licensed copy of Photoshop Elements 2.0.

The only real difference from my EOS 30 to my 10D in terms of user input is the exposure. I was constantly having to overexpose my Provia slides on the EOS 30 by +0.5 whereas on the 10D, I have to underexpose - typically -0.3 or sometimes -0.6. The histogram on the image replay means that you can nail a good exposure very quickly. The biggest luxury is changing the ISO setting on the fly. After shooting at 200mm 1/250 F8 at ISO 100, I can slap a 500mm on, change the ISO to 200 and shoot 1/500 F8.

Regards,
Craig.



User currently offlineThomasphoto60 From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 3938 posts, RR: 22
Reply 18, posted (11 years 1 month 3 weeks 4 days 1 hour ago) and read 8775 times:

Thanks Craig,

Its good to know that I can work on the fly as I used to working at rather a fast pace.

Thomas



"Show me the Braniffs"
User currently offlineJFKTOWERFAN From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 1100 posts, RR: 15
Reply 19, posted (11 years 1 month 3 weeks 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 8738 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
DATABASE EDITOR

with the bonus of a histogram analysis of the scene allowing you to fine-tune exposure in a very precise fashion.

What should the ideal histogram look like?

Corey



C'mon Man
User currently offlineCkw From UK - England, joined Aug 2010, 731 posts, RR: 16
Reply 20, posted (11 years 1 month 3 weeks 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 8728 times:

There is not a universal "ideal" histogram, because it depends on the content.

In an "average" scene (whatever that might be) the histogram should look like a smooth hill with the peak in the middle and trailing off right to the edge of the graph.

If you are shooting a scene with lots of light areas (note NOT necessarily under bright light), then the hill should bunch up torwards the right side of the scale, shoot a scene with predominently dark areas , and the hill moves to the left.

Each vertical line in the histogram represents the number of pixels in one of the 255 levels of brightness available (0=black 255=white). 0 is at the extreme left, 255 at the extreme right.

In a perfect exposure of an average scene (provided the scene's contrast can be captured by sensor) you will want a few pixels to represent pure black (darkest shadow), and a few to represent pure white (highlights) - if your graph does not extend from end to end of the histogram, you are compressing the dynamic range of the scene and creating excessive contrast. If you see a spike at either end of the histogram, you've over or under exposed.

The key is to understand what the histogram is telling you and be able map it to the scene you're trying to capture. It takes a little while, but you'll soon be able to visualise the scene as seen though the viewfinder as a histogram.

The best way to learn is to play around with an image using the level controls in PS - you'll be able to see the effect changing the graph as on the image.

If you have a DSLR, its worth getting very familiar with the histogram as it allows you to fine tune an exposure much more easily than with even the most sophisticated metering system.

Cheers,

Colin



Colin K. Work, Pixstel
User currently offlineKingwide From United Kingdom, joined Aug 2001, 838 posts, RR: 19
Reply 21, posted (11 years 1 month 3 weeks 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 8724 times:

hehe! I was about to post almost exactly the same text as Colin but with a picture as well. So here's the picture but without the words since Colin said 'em for me  Smile

Correct exposure at the top, too much shadow second and too much highlight third. Note the difference in the histograms.






J



Jason Taperell - AirTeamImages
User currently offlineJFKTOWERFAN From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 1100 posts, RR: 15
Reply 22, posted (11 years 1 month 3 weeks 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 8712 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
DATABASE EDITOR

Thanks guys, I wasn't sure if the logical looking histogram was it or of there was more to it. I really appreciate you guys sharing your knowledge with the rest of us(I am sure I am not the only one).

Corey



C'mon Man
User currently offlineEGGD From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2001, 12443 posts, RR: 35
Reply 23, posted (11 years 1 month 3 weeks 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 8710 times:

Yes but usually with the ideal histogram you will have your black and white sliders at either end and the grey slider will be at the base of the 'peak' so to speak, at least thats what i've found when i've used the histogram (usually I just go on memory).

User currently offlineEGGD From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2001, 12443 posts, RR: 35
Reply 24, posted (11 years 1 month 3 weeks 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 8705 times:

Here's another good example to show what I mean:




you'll still have to change the colour balance though if you have a caste (i've got a pink caste in my photos), and you'll have to do that manually (I think, also there might be a histogram for that too??).


25 Post contains images EGGD : And just to back up what Colin has said, my picture was underexposed slightly and hadn't nearly enough contrast (but thats just a camera problem and t
26 Ckw : OK we need to be careful here in distinguishing the use of the histogram on a DSLR and as part of levels in Photoshop. On the DSLR, it simply provides
27 EGGD : Yeah I understand the loss of detail but I assume thats just because of the underexposure coupled with the low contrast.
28 Post contains links BA777 : Got my '30 now, got a new 28-105 F3.5-4.5 MKII USM coming this week before the RIAT on Fri/Sat. I've been using RAW recently quite a bit, however my f
29 Post contains links and images EGGD : I like this camera.. I'm amazed at the results even at 820mm there's no deterioration in the image quality despite the B-300 being a little 'used' htt
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