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RAW Software  
User currently offlineWork4bmi From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (11 years 5 months 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 1337 times:

What is the best "RAW" mode software for downloading to the PC? Can you download this software off the web, what are their pros and cons?

Thanks,

10 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineKingwide From United Kingdom, joined Aug 2001, 838 posts, RR: 18
Reply 1, posted (11 years 5 months 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 1310 times:

I use Capture One DSLR. Quite a steep learning curve but a superbly good piece of software. Also costs $99.


J



Jason Taperell - AirTeamImages
User currently offlineCkw From UK - England, joined Aug 2010, 767 posts, RR: 16
Reply 2, posted (11 years 5 months 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 1295 times:

I concur with Jason, though Breezebrowser is also very good and perhaps easier to use. I've heard good things about the new Photoshop plugin for RAW conversion, but I don't think the 10D is supported yet - when it is, I'll certainly give it a try as it would streamline my workflow significantly.

Cheers,

Colin



Colin K. Work, Pixstel
User currently offlineWork4bmi From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (11 years 5 months 4 days 14 hours ago) and read 1252 times:

So, what are the benefits of shooting in RAW?

User currently offlineCkw From UK - England, joined Aug 2010, 767 posts, RR: 16
Reply 4, posted (11 years 5 months 4 days 14 hours ago) and read 1247 times:

Maximum possible quality and the ability to reset many of the camera's parameters after you've taken the picture. With some packages you can even apply +/- 1 to 2 stops exposure compensation after the picture has been taken.

Furthermore, when new software comes along, you can go back to old RAW files and reprocesses them to take advantage of any improved functionality.

With jpgs, the resulting file is fixed - there is a very limited scope for adjustment without loss of quality.

Cheers,

Colin




Colin K. Work, Pixstel
User currently offlineWork4bmi From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (11 years 5 months 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 1219 times:

Colin, you made is very clear - its seems to be a good idea then, although them files are rather big. Also, I know you were/are an experienced Canon D60 user...

Not to brag a little, but I do get alot of photos published. Which is the best size on the D60 for publication. I know there is the whole 300dpi rule, does the D60 cater for this?

Thanks


User currently offlineCraigy From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2001, 1118 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (11 years 5 months 3 days 23 hours ago) and read 1213 times:

If you convert the D60 RAW file to a 16-bit TIFF, you will end up with a 36MB file. With all this information, it is possible to up-size these images for larger prints @ 300 DPI. The standard converted RAW is 3072 x 2048 which is about 10 x 7 inches.

Have a look at this thread about printing from the 10D, which much better explains all this.

http://www.airliners.net/discussions/aviation_photography/read.main/96333/

Regards,
Craig.

[Edited 2003-07-20 16:36:37]

User currently offlineCkw From UK - England, joined Aug 2010, 767 posts, RR: 16
Reply 7, posted (11 years 5 months 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 1202 times:

I'm happy with interpolations of up to 2x the original image size ( which comes out as about 20x16 inches at 300dpi) and have sold images at that size with no complaints.

Cheers,

Colin



Colin K. Work, Pixstel
User currently offlineWork4bmi From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (11 years 5 months 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 1191 times:

One thing I am always unsure of, is when the size and dpi is right... do I sharpen to the best I can, or send to the people who want to publish it and let them get the sharpness and other editing procedures right?



User currently offlineKingwide From United Kingdom, joined Aug 2001, 838 posts, RR: 18
Reply 9, posted (11 years 5 months 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 1187 times:

Send it unsharpened and let the printers do the sharpening. They know their final target and it's characteristics and will be able to sharpen it to suit the printing method they're using. If you sharpen it yourself then you are taking a risk that your sharpening will be unsuitable for the desired end result and, at worst, you lose the sale.


J



Jason Taperell - AirTeamImages
User currently offlineWork4bmi From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 10, posted (11 years 5 months 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 1188 times:

Good good! Will take that knowledge in and remember for next time.

Thanks,


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