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Should Photographing F/A's During The Flight Be Al  
User currently offlineIcaro From Spain, joined Nov 2004, 227 posts, RR: 0
Posted (7 years 5 months 2 weeks 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 3442 times:

Hi all, after reading this post Iberia...no Pictures In Cabin! (by RootsAir Jan 16 2007 in Civil Aviation) and feeling that the subject has now changed, I, as a flight attendant, would like to get your opinions about this:

-Should passengers be allowed to take pics of the F/A's without their permission?


I feel that it shouldn't be because when I'm at work I expect some kind of privacy, and what I do is only intended for the passengers I am carrying, not for YouTube, or their holiday photo book.

What do you think? Would you feel comfortable if someone came to your work station and got a pic of yourself without even asking?

Thanks for your answers.

16 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently onlineMasseyBrown From United States of America, joined Dec 2002, 5351 posts, RR: 7
Reply 1, posted (7 years 5 months 2 weeks 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 3423 times:

All the guidebooks say the polite tourist will ask permission before photographing the natives. Don't know why this wouldn't apply to FAs.  Smile


I love long German words like 'Freundschaftsbezeigungen'.
User currently offlineAirfoilsguy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (7 years 5 months 2 weeks 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 3399 times:

I believe you should ask permission before taking anyone's picture. To not ask permission is rude and an invasion of privacy.

User currently offline777ER From New Zealand, joined Dec 2003, 12082 posts, RR: 18
Reply 3, posted (7 years 5 months 2 weeks 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 3399 times:
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Then should the same apply for TV cameras or newspaper reporters filming/photographing a worker anywhere. There is no law stopping anyone from filming or taking someones picture, unless its in certain cases like court. In other words, your working in a public area with public access. Everyone in their live will take pictures of someone who is working.

User currently offline57AZ From United States of America, joined Nov 2004, 2550 posts, RR: 2
Reply 4, posted (7 years 5 months 2 weeks 4 days 16 hours ago) and read 3368 times:

On an aircraft carrying passengers, your right to privacy is diminished and from a legal standpoint, the photographer probably can photograph whomever/whatever they want as long as the photograph will not be used for commercial purposes. Taking a picture of someone without their permission can be rude, but in a public place it is by no means a violation of privacy.


"When a man runs on railroads over half of his lifetime he is fit for nothing else-and at times he don't know that."
User currently offlineDeskflier From Sweden, joined Jan 2007, 537 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (7 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 3288 times:

Taking pictures of F/A's could enable would be hijackers to select body doubles to actual crew members, for infiltrating the crew. I would assume the increased awareness of terrorism is the cause for such a rule. The aviation authorities has imposed much crazier rules for travellers to follow, due to terrorism. Also, for hijackers the layout of the cockpit is of crucial interest. What the common man don´t realize is, that an act of terrorism is like a military operation. Your chance of success increase if you have good intellegence during planning, a mole among your adversaries could be very useful, and there is nothing wrong with making your own map of the operations theatre. So the privacy issue for the F/A's is the minor part in this question.


How can anyone not fly, when we live at a time when we can fly?
User currently offlineDeltaGator From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 6341 posts, RR: 13
Reply 6, posted (7 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 3285 times:

Quoting Icaro (Thread starter):
I feel that it shouldn't be because when I'm at work I expect some kind of privacy

Then I suggest you get a different job that doesn't require you to be in the public view. If you want privacy on the job perhaps you need to become a cubicle jockey.

Quoting Deskflier (Reply 5):
Taking pictures of F/A's could enable would be hijackers to select body doubles to actual crew members, for infiltrating the crew.

Oh dear lord. Body doubles? What would that serve? The bad guys still have to get past security and such so having someone who could be a body double doesn't seem to be a big deal. Unless of course they follow them to their hotel, dispatch them to the internal dirt nap for their uniform, fake an ID, fool the crew they have been flying with, gain access to the airline's internal scheduling computers and so on and so forth.

A body double works when Julia Roberts doesn't want to show her butt in Pretty Woman, not when you want to hijack a plane.

Quoting Deskflier (Reply 5):
Also, for hijackers the layout of the cockpit is of crucial interest.

Nothing they couldn't find online with a simple Google search down to each and every individual button, lever, and switch inside the cockpit.



"If you can't delight in the misery of others then you don't deserve to be a college football fan."
User currently offline57AZ From United States of America, joined Nov 2004, 2550 posts, RR: 2
Reply 7, posted (7 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 3278 times:

Quoting DeltaGator (Reply 6):
Nothing they couldn't find online with a simple Google search down to each and every individual button, lever, and switch inside the cockpit.

Why Google when all you have to do is run a search on this website??? If you think that the rules that the TSA has concocted since 9/11 have made us any safer, you've missed the boat. A real terrorist is going to inflitrate the organization/industry regaredless of the roadblocks that you attempt to put up.

As for the issue regarding individual rights, it is a big deal. What we are seeing now is an attempt by certain groups to roll back rights that are guaranteed to each citizen by the Constitution of the United States of America. These acts are being perpetrated under the guise of National Security. While aviation safety is a prime concern to me, I am not going to allow a lowlife politician or anyone else to diminish my (or anyone else's) rights that are guaranteed under the Constitution.



"When a man runs on railroads over half of his lifetime he is fit for nothing else-and at times he don't know that."
User currently offlineIAirAllie From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (7 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 3254 times:

Quoting 57AZ (Reply 4):
Taking a picture of someone without their permission can be rude, but in a public place it is by no means a violation of privacy.

It is rude because it is a violation of privacy. In non-secured areas however there is nothing illegal about it. Always ask first.


User currently offlineLite From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (7 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 3232 times:

As has already been mentioned, every guidebook will tell you that if you wish to take a photograph of somebody or their environment, it is good manners to ask first. At my local airport, it is prohibited to take any photographs inside the terminal without prior permission. If somebody asks to take a photo of me because they're off on holiday when they check in (trust me it happens especially with stag/hen parties and families with young kids) I'm usually happy to oblige, but it's best to ask!

User currently offlineKiwiandrew From New Zealand, joined Jun 2005, 8526 posts, RR: 14
Reply 10, posted (7 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 3226 times:
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Quoting 777ER (Reply 3):
In other words, your working in a public area with public access.

an aircraft is not a public area , it is private property , the fact that you have purchased a ticket does not give you the right to display bad manners . If you ask nicely most people will say "yes" .. and if they say "no " you should respect that

Quoting Icaro (Thread starter):
Would you feel comfortable if someone came to your work station and got a pic of yourself without even asking?

no , I would be extremely annoyed , it is a terrible breach of manners .



Moderation in all things ... including moderation ;-)
User currently offlineJeremy From United States of America, joined May 2001, 668 posts, RR: 1
Reply 11, posted (7 years 5 months 2 weeks 22 hours ago) and read 3219 times:

Like others have stated, it should not be a problem if you ask.
I have been an F/A and would have no problem either way of people asking me or not asking.



You are now free to be sexually harassed and then terminated for filing a complaint--Southwest Airlines to me.
User currently offlineSan747 From United States of America, joined Dec 2004, 4941 posts, RR: 12
Reply 12, posted (7 years 5 months 2 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 3210 times:

One time in 2005, when I was on a QX flight from ONT to PDX, there was this really pretty FA, and I wanted to take a picture of her for my trip report. I knew though if I was going to take a pic, I would have to ask her, it just seemed like the proper thing to do...

Of course, I pussed out and just exited the aircraft without even a word to her... Oh well, I was 17 at the time.



Scotty doesn't know...
User currently offline57AZ From United States of America, joined Nov 2004, 2550 posts, RR: 2
Reply 13, posted (7 years 5 months 2 weeks 11 hours ago) and read 3203 times:

Quoting IAirAllie (Reply 8):
It is rude because it is a violation of privacy.

Violation of privacy only applies in an area where one has a reasonable right to expect privacy. An aircraft engaged in the transportation of passengers for contract does not meet that standard (excluding the lavatories), regardless of ownership. If the Conditions of Carriage do not specifically prohibit photography on the aircraft, there is nothing legally the carrier can do to stop someone from taking photographs unless the aircraft is on the ground at a facility that has photo restrictions.

Quoting Kiwiandrew (Reply 10):
an aircraft is not a public area , it is private property

Actually, only parts of an aircraft may be regarded as a public area-chiefly the main cabin. Areas such as the lavatories are non-public and thus one legally has a right to expect a certain degree of privacy. The public area rule (so far as it applies in the United States) does cover private property when the express purpose of that area is to conduct business with private persons invited by the owner for the purposes of business.

Quoting Kiwiandrew (Reply 10):
Would you feel comfortable if someone came to your work station and got a pic of yourself without even asking?

Doesn't make a difference for me as photography in the Superior Court of Pima County is prohibited without express written consent by the Presiding Judge. If you attempt to use a camera or camera phone, you will be required to cease and desist. If you refuse, judicial security (deputy sheriffs) have the option of doing anything from asking you to cease and desist up to and including seizing the camera/film and possibly arresting the offender for violation of a judicial order. To be fair, this policy is posted at each public entry door to the courthouse.



"When a man runs on railroads over half of his lifetime he is fit for nothing else-and at times he don't know that."
User currently offlineIAirAllie From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (7 years 5 months 1 week 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 3155 times:

I'm not speaking legally, I'm speaking general courtesy. I still belive it manners wise is a violation of privacy to take someones photo without their permission regardless of where they are.

User currently offlineFCAFLYBOY From United Kingdom, joined Nov 2006, 586 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (7 years 5 months 1 week 6 days 3 hours ago) and read 3141 times:

I'm an F/A, and this is how I feel:

Without permission - no thanks! I wanna look good in that picture Big grin
although I can see that there's no real law against it, as previously pointed out.

Ask my permission, then you can snap away! it's all about manners in my eyes.


User currently offlineDelta767300ER From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 2562 posts, RR: 12
Reply 16, posted (7 years 5 months 1 week 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 3094 times:

I've never intentionally took photos of a F/A without permission. Their have been a few times where I was about to take a photo of the cabin and a F/A stepped into view. Most of them got out of the way quickly and laughed. I promised them I wouldnt blast their photos all over the internet.

I've actually had a couple female F/A's wanting to get into a photo as well as having a photo taken with me.

I wouldnt intentionally take a photo of a F/A without permission.

-Delta767300ER


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