Sponsor Message:
Travel Polls & Prefs Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
How Many Of You Have Lost The Magic For Aviation?  
User currently offlineRootsAir From Costa Rica, joined Feb 2005, 4186 posts, RR: 41
Posted (7 years 5 months 2 weeks 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 5500 times:

Hi folks,

In this website, there are 40,000 if not more aviation fans.
For me, aviation is my biggest hobby. I simply love flying, making models, look at aircrafts and everything else that has to do with commercial aviation .

However I decided not to work in the aviation industry by fear of losing that magic that makes me love aviation. I have heard from some A.net members that they have joined an airline and that the magic that has made them love aviation has dimmed away!

How many of you have had this happen to you ?

Regards

BM

[Edited 2007-01-28 19:54:47]


A man without the knowledge of his past history,culture and origins is like a tree without roots
19 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineANCFlyer From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (7 years 5 months 2 weeks 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 5450 times:

Truth be told, I love to fly. I enjoy every bit of the experience on board 99% of the time.

What I can't stand is all the  redflag  involved in just getting on the plane. From making reservations with 99% of our res system outsourced to somewhere (please see my thread on US Airways dated back last fall), to showing up 2-3 hours before the flight, to dealing with the TSA morons, and wondering if luggage will arrive, and then the variables one cannot control: WX, MX,  grumpy  cabin crew.

The Magic - after over 2 million miles in the air - has definitely waned.

Flying these days is tantamount to taking a Greyhound Bus (in Y and occasionally even in F - please see US, DL as examples). It's simply a means to an end.

If I lived in the lower 48 states, perhaps I wouldn't have to spend so much time on a plane to get anywhere. As it stands, if I had an option of driving or flying and the journey was less than 1000 miles, I'd drive. To hell with all the headache. Unfortunately, living in Alaska, the first flight (to the closest major hub outside Alaska in the US - SEA) is still 1500 miles. The same drive takes 3 days. So flying is necessary.

Still - while aboard, I love it. The rest of the "experience" you can have.


User currently offlineSabena332 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (7 years 5 months 2 weeks 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 5411 times:

Quoting ANCFlyer (Reply 1):
to showing up 2-3 hours before the flight, to dealing with the TSA morons, and wondering if luggage will arrive, and then the variables one cannot control

 checkmark 

Flying used to be fun but nowadays it is only annoying. Queuing at the check-in counter, queuing at the security check, queuing at the passport control, queuing at the gate for a second passport and boarding pass control, queuing at the passport control of the destination airport, queuing at the baggage claim, queuing at the customs control, etc. Furthermore are bullshit regulations like this "no liquids over 100ml" rule annoying as hell.

I don't book flights for fun anymore to get a flight on a specific airline or aircraft, nowadays I only want to get to my destination and back as comfortable as possible.

Patrick


User currently offlineXJRamper From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 2453 posts, RR: 51
Reply 3, posted (7 years 5 months 2 weeks 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 5406 times:

Ive worked in the airline industry for the past three years. I've seen a lot of stuff that, to any normal human being, would naturally turn them off. Crew delays, screaming pax, the ever famous quote "do you know who i am?", all should get old for normal people.

Not I. I know what I'm about to say is extremely cheesy, but here goes. I get yelled at, screamed at, threatened, and yet, I still walk away from the airport every day with a smile on my face, watching all the planes taking off from the Riddle flight line, the occasional commercial aircraft (ie delta, airtran, etc). You know why? Its a passion that has been driven into my heart. The massive and impressive wing flex of a heavy 744 taking off or even the cessna 152 landing with the sunset right behind them.

Everything is worth it. For those people who have "lost" the interest, maybe they were in it for the face value, nothing more.

XJR  Smile



Look ma' no hands!
User currently offlineN231YE From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (7 years 5 months 2 weeks 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 5403 times:

I agree, that airline flying has lost it's "magic."

However, once you get a PPL or higher, then that flame atop the candle of aviation is rekindled, and it becomes fun all over again. These aren't my pictures, obviously, but you get the majestic feeling of flying an aircraft yourself:


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Stephen Liard




View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Nick Onkow




View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Thomas Vesth



User currently offlineAY104 From Canada, joined Nov 2005, 505 posts, RR: 6
Reply 5, posted (7 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 5364 times:

Never lost the "magic" for aviation, still love to get on an airplane and love to look out of the window. Unfortunately, looking out of the window is another little avenue of pleasure that is closing more and more, due to the increase of inflight entertainment over the years: "Please lower your window shades, so other passengers can view the movie." etc etc. Why should I lower my window shade, I have a right to look out of the window if I so wish. When I was 13 years old, it was a real experience to fly the polar route to Europe and back. I could not stop looking out of the window. The cockpit crew in those days made numerous announcements of landmarks, geographic areas and general flight progress. Now all the kids want to do is play with their electronic gadgets. Nobody seems interested in that stuff anymore. Until I joined this website, I thought I was the only one who still got a thrill from flying. I realize a lot of people, however, have to travel a lot on business, and I am sure the novelty in that case can wear off pretty quickly.
I did work for the airlines until 1998, however, that is one job I definitely don't want to do anymore. Definitely the mentality of a lot of the travelling public leaves a lot to be desired, like the example of "Don't you know who I am?" etc. All that wears real thing very quickly. The only carriers I can imagine working for would be Southwest in the US, or WestJet in Canada. Believe me, having one class of service would make work a lot more pleasure.
But no, the magic of aviation is not lost on me.
Cheers,
AY104



The only thing a customer should expect for his/her loyalty is good service
User currently offlineAdam T. From United States of America, joined Jun 2000, 957 posts, RR: 6
Reply 6, posted (7 years 5 months 1 week 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 5266 times:

I still love to fly but i'll admit since i've gotten older I don't get the whole butterflies in the stomach that I used to the night before I flew. For me though I usually look at the whole experience.....from arriving at the airport to arriving at the final destination and leaving the airport there. I used to get excited going up to the counter and stuff but I honestly don't get that excited until i'm actually on the plane.

I've often thought about going into the industry somehow.....especially since i'm graduating college in May and not sure exactly what I want to do. If I ever did I think I would like to work in the headquarters or something like marketing or route planning.


User currently offlineSacamojus From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 228 posts, RR: 1
Reply 7, posted (7 years 5 months 1 week 5 days 19 hours ago) and read 5260 times:

Unfortunately I cannot answer the original post as I am not employed in the aviation industry ,nor do I have plans to.(B.S. Finance and will be working on a Masters in Divinity and Theology) But I love everything about flying. I used to have a great fear of flying, especially on takeoff, but I would still fly because I just love. It kills me to read people's complaints about commercial aviation today. Maybe it because I never flew with real silverware or never had that golden class of service, but I love the experience regardless of the F/A and the IFE. It just amazes me that I am able to travel several miles above the ground going 500 miles an hour!

User currently offlineTango-Bravo From United States of America, joined Jun 2001, 3802 posts, RR: 29
Reply 8, posted (7 years 5 months 1 week 3 days 23 hours ago) and read 5211 times:

Quoting RootsAir (Thread starter):
owever I decided not to work in the aviation industry by fear of losing that magic that makes me love aviation.

By choosing not to work in aviation/airline industry, you have certainly chosen a path that will help you to retain your love of aviation.

Quoting RootsAir (Thread starter):
I have heard from some A.net members that they have joined an airline and that the magic that has made them love aviation has dimmed away!

There certainly is an ambivalence that tends to develop when an airline enthusiast joins an airline as an employee that can dim one's perspective on aviation. One way it might be described would be, "it is much more enjoyable to have airlines as a hobby than as a job" as I immediately discovered when I began working for an airline, a perspective that has not changed one iota from then until now, eight years later and still with the same airline.

That is not to say that an airline job cannot be an enjoyable and rewarding experience much of the time and, in my case, has in no way diminished my passion for airline and airliner history, airliner model building, and old airline timetables that had been part of me for more than 20 years before I began working for an airline.

In many ways an airline job has, for me, actually fed into my airline and airliner hobby interests, which have in turn fed into my interest in working for an airline. A rather nebulous concept, perhaps, but one that is well understood by myself as well as a number of co-workers who share my interest in "things airline" as a hobby.

One's view of airline management and marketing is what, above all, tends to become jaded and cynical when working for an airline and having a view of airline operations "from the inside."


User currently offlineG4LASRamper From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 170 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (7 years 5 months 1 week 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 5191 times:

The bloom is definitely off the rose for me. I chased a flying career for 17 years without much success and finally called it quits years ago. Haven't ridden on a plane, even as a pax, since 1998. Now I find myself working for an airline - as a ramper. Recently had some setbacks there too - went back to being a regular ramper instead of a lead. But I still like being around the planes, and a lot of the people that work in/around/with them. Been thinking about trying to get back in the flying game after 12 years on the ground, but oh the cost. I have a lot less to spend these days than I did back when I was in the chase. It's not a good bet. Still...


"A pig that doesn't fly is just a pig." - Porco Rosso
User currently offlineOHLHD From Finland, joined Dec 2004, 3962 posts, RR: 25
Reply 10, posted (7 years 5 months 2 days 6 hours ago) and read 5123 times:

The love is there but d/t the hazzle is getting more and more.

But, I am still out to get more aircraft types getting more airlines and more and more destinations.

Like my next trip:

VIE - GOT ( never been there)
GOT - CPH
CPH - OSL ( on Sterling; new airline)
OSL - BOO ( on Braathens new airline + new Dest)
BOO - TOS ( via NVK) ( on Wideroe ; TOS + NVK = 2 new Destinations + new A/C type ( DH1)


Once I am inside the aircraft everything else disappears for me.


User currently offlineWILCO737 From Greenland, joined Jun 2004, 8967 posts, RR: 76
Reply 11, posted (7 years 5 months 2 days 6 hours ago) and read 5119 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
HEAD MODERATOR

Quoting RootsAir (Thread starter):
However I decided not to work in the aviation industry by fear of losing that magic that makes me love aviation. I have heard from some A.net members that they have joined an airline and that the magic that has made them love aviation has dimmed away!

Hey there,

flying was always my dream since I was a baby! I always wanted to be a pilot.
Well, I made it and I havent lost a bit of the magic of flying! I still love flying and I think I will forever! Big grin
Sitting 80 years old in my wheelchair near the runway in FRA, drooling about the new B 979-300  Wink and telling some great stories when flying was still flying Big grin

WILCO737
 airplane 



It it's not Boeing, I am not going.
User currently offlineIAHFLYR From United States of America, joined Jun 2005, 4790 posts, RR: 22
Reply 12, posted (7 years 5 months 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 5107 times:

I still get just as excited today when I call to reserve a plane for rental as I did the very first time....flying as the PIC or as a passenger is a thrill. I still love to go out to the airport and just sit and watch airplanes from a simple taxiing Cessna to the the take-off and landing by jet aircraft, it doesn't matter what is as long as it flies. That is the simple magic.

Then there is the other junk, the stuff that I think most would agree that has tainted our magic show!

Quoting ANCFlyer (Reply 1):
What I can't stand is all the involved in just getting on the plane. From making reservations with 99% of our res system outsourced to somewhere (please see my thread on US Airways dated back last fall), to showing up 2-3 hours before the flight, to dealing with the TSA morons, and wondering if luggage will arrive, and then the variables one cannot control: WX, MX, cabin crew.

 checkmark 

Quoting XJRamper (Reply 3):
Crew delays, screaming pax, the ever famous quote "do you know who i am?", all should get old for normal people.

 checkmark 

Quoting Tango-Bravo (Reply 8):
One's view of airline management and marketing is what, above all, tends to become jaded and cynical when working for an airline and having a view of airline operations "from the inside."

Toss governmental agencies and their management on this list as well.

 checkmark   checkmark 

Luckily for me, I am able to separate the magical side of aviation from the  redflag  side which still allows me to drift off for just a second to find the magic within aviation even while dealing with the tarnished side.



Any views shared are strictly my own and do not a represent those of any former employer.
User currently offlineSwissy From Switzerland, joined Jan 2005, 1734 posts, RR: 4
Reply 13, posted (7 years 5 months 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 5096 times:

Sure the "magic" is gone for the most part, it seams the world got a whole lot smaller and the stress level has gone up by 1000% however if I think about the A380/787/350 it sure gets my  hearts  going again.....but there is a good chance in 50 years or so perhaps we will declare "today" as magic.....

Cheers,


User currently offlinePlymSpotter From Spain, joined Jun 2004, 11607 posts, RR: 60
Reply 14, posted (7 years 5 months 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 5078 times:

The magic for me hasn't really died, but I don't have the same perhaps sometimes overzealous and occasionally nerdy passion that I used to have for it in my early teens. For instance, I don't walk around airports like I did when I was 12 or 13 with a par of binoculars round my neck, a camera cord around my wrist and a notebook and pen in hand, yes I probably was the archetypal spotter then, but hey, I was young!

I have to admit that last year flying began to get a little boring for me at times, but this was only on the flights that I frequented and aircraft that have appeared many, many times before in my log book. But, to make it more interesting I have decided to set myself the challenge of flying as many types of new, and preferably old and rare aircraft that I can - I don't really mind how far I have to fly to get on them either. I can though foresee that I will begin to get very sick of Dash 8's, as it looks like I'll be commuting between work and university on them every week from the end of this year, but it certainly beats the train!


Dan Smile



...love is just a camouflage for what resembles rage again...
User currently offlineAzoresLover From United States of America, joined Jun 2004, 750 posts, RR: 6
Reply 15, posted (7 years 5 months 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 5055 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

I know this will sound very negative and cynical, but...absolutely I have lost all interest and desire to ever fly commercially. I will only do it now if I am figuratively "dragged kicking and screaming" to a commercial flight. Flying has been a passion, and I do miss the experience of flight. But I simply cannot stand all of the hassle anymore. When absolutely necessary I'll fly, like long distance for work. But if possible I drive. Even a trip to Nova Scotia for my company, a 2-day drive from here...rent a car locally and drive up and back...MUCH more enjoyable than flying.

Case in point...my last flying trip. I took a day trip in Spring 2006 from CAK to BOS just to introduce a friend to his first ever flight. Upon reaching security, we're pulled aside for very thorough checking, sitting there while everything we had was searched thoroughly, and we were "swabbed" all over our person and other items with the swabs being fed into the explosives detector. It took us 10 minutes to get through that process...AFTER waiting in the security line. Checking in at BOS later in the day for the return flight...same thing! That was the final straw for me.

While I understand and support the need for security, I'm also sick and tired of being subjected to this kind of treatment every time I fly. That BOS trip last year was my last one flying. If I need to go to BOS - an 11-hour drive. ATL is a 10-hour drive. ORD is an 8-hour drive. DCA is 5 hours. NYC is 7 hours. Who needs to fly?????

Obviously I'm in a minority here, I understand that. But after several trips in the post-9/11 era, including twice to Manila, I've had it with the hassles, and will only fly in the future if absolutely necessary.



Those who want to do something will find a way; those who don't will find an excuse.
User currently offlineDesertAir From Mexico, joined Jan 2006, 1457 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (7 years 5 months 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 5054 times:

The commercial aviation industry still holds a sway over me. I cannot be outside and not look up when I hear a jet overhead. I enjoy wandering around the airport looking at ticket counters, observing schedules and watching planes land and take off. I enjoy flying itself even with the hassles. As I have written in other threads, I lament the demise of the many small and large colorful airlines that once flew our skies.

User currently offlineTango-Bravo From United States of America, joined Jun 2001, 3802 posts, RR: 29
Reply 17, posted (7 years 5 months 22 hours ago) and read 5043 times:

Quoting AzoresLover (Reply 15):
I've had it with the hassles, and will only fly in the future if absolutely necessary.

Even with my generous airline employee (non-rev) flight benefits I have passed up countless opportunites to travel as I did before 9/11/01 changed everything. It's not only the marked increase in general airport and security hassles that have dissuaded me from traveling more often for little or nothing, but also the increasingly unreliable flight operations and off-the-charts load factors which mean that if anyone so much as sneezes, flight schedules are disrupted to a point that even revenue pax can be stranded beyond reason, to say nothing of non-rev (standby) pax.


User currently offlineLHboyatDTW From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 18, posted (7 years 5 months 6 hours ago) and read 5015 times:

At times I do get frustrated with flying mainly because of the fact that I have to work around another person's schedule (in this case, the airlines) and if something goes wrong, I have no control over it.

It does irritate me with that and the fact that the Thousands Standing Around doesn't help either with them barely letting you take liquids on board unless it's bought after security.


User currently offline1stfl94 From United Kingdom, joined May 2006, 1455 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (7 years 5 months 3 hours ago) and read 5001 times:

The magic tends to wear off when your sitting at midnight in a departure lounge when you should have taken off three hours ago. That said, I still excited by takeoffs (not so much landings) and whenever I'm flying somewhere new. Admittedly when I talk to my Grandad about his experiences back the in the 60s and 70s I feel jealous despite the advances in todays's aircraft

Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
Best Time Of The Year For Aviation! posted Mon Oct 17 2005 06:27:49 by Squirrel83
How Many Aircraft Types Have You Flown? posted Sat May 29 2004 01:46:45 by Bragi
How Often Do You Buy Tickets On-Line For Others? posted Sun Apr 2 2006 04:06:34 by PanAm747
How Many % Of Male Cabin Crew Are Gay? posted Tue Feb 28 2006 20:43:47 by Bofredrik
How Many Of These Can We Come Up With? posted Thu Feb 10 2005 06:07:43 by PanAm747
How Often Do You Click On The Ads? posted Sun Aug 8 2004 07:41:20 by Trickijedi
How Many Times Have You Crossed The Atlantic? posted Wed Jan 10 2007 06:51:28 by MSYtristar
How Many Miles Have You Flown? posted Sat Sep 30 2006 18:56:40 by Varig_dc10
How Many Airlines Have You Experienced? posted Wed Aug 30 2006 05:16:35 by BillReid
How Many Miles For Around The World In F? posted Tue Aug 15 2006 16:55:52 by S12PPL