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GPS Handhelds On Board- Which One To Buy?  
User currently offlineDeaphen From India, joined Jul 2005, 1425 posts, RR: 1
Posted (7 years 2 months 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 4371 times:

Hi

I needed some information, i ahve often read of people carrying their handheld GPS devices on board and using them without any problem while inflight. And basically getting information about speed, location, altitude, etc.

Can anyone give me more information about this? And which devices would you recommend? I am very keen on purchasing one for myself.

For those who will definately say "Electronics must be turned off during flight"...I am just kidding.. haha.

No seriously, i think a handheld GPS thing is very cool for both onboard and while on the ground.

regards
nitin

[Edited 2007-05-30 11:40:57]


I want every single airport and airplane in India to be on A.net!
16 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineN587NK From United States of America, joined Jun 2005, 300 posts, RR: 1
Reply 1, posted (7 years 2 months 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 4359 times:
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well in the US per FAA regulations all transmitting and recieving devices may not be used in flight. and cell phones and wireless email devices may only be used if the wireless connection has been disabled. However I'm not sure about tother countries regs.

User currently offlineDeaphen From India, joined Jul 2005, 1425 posts, RR: 1
Reply 2, posted (7 years 2 months 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 4352 times:

Quoting N587NK (Reply 1):
well in the US per FAA regulations all transmitting and recieving devices may not be used in flight. and cell phones and wireless email devices may only be used if the wireless connection has been disabled. However I'm not sure about tother countries regs.

Apparantly its allowed if used over 10,000 feet.

regards
nitin



I want every single airport and airplane in India to be on A.net!
User currently offline777DEN From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 124 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (7 years 2 months 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 4328 times:

GPS only works inflight if you have a window seat that has a good view of the sky.

User currently offlineDeaphen From India, joined Jul 2005, 1425 posts, RR: 1
Reply 4, posted (7 years 2 months 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 4291 times:

Quoting 777DEN (Reply 3):
GPS only works inflight if you have a window seat that has a good view of the sky.

Yes i am aware of that..... i just need to know which would be the ideal one for me to buy.. which would give me the maximum amount of information.

nitin



I want every single airport and airplane in India to be on A.net!
User currently offlineSP90 From United States of America, joined May 2006, 388 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (7 years 2 months 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 4261 times:

Try the Garmin Nuvi 600. Very easy to use and very accurate, even works in urban canyons like the streets of NYC.

User currently offlineMaidensGator From United States of America, joined Jan 2007, 945 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (7 years 2 months 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 4253 times:

I've posted these links in here before. The first is a list of airlines that specifically approve/disapprove of GPS use by passengers. The second gives some general info on the use of handheld GPS on airliners.

http://www.gpsinformation.net/airgps/airgps.htm

http://www.gpsinformation.net/airgps/gpsrfi.htm

I've used my Magellan Meridian on airline flights many times. As stated, you need to hold it by the window for a few minutes to allow it to lock in. My GPS model is outdated and no longer sold, but I got it 4 or 5 years ago at Walmart for around $200. It works great, you can probably get one for half that price. I think most any model will give you altitude, speed, and location.

While waiting for a USAir flight a couple years ago, the pilots were hanging out in the loading area, so I asked them if it was ok to use. They said sure, no problem. I never turn it on until they make the announcement that electronics can be used. It is fun.

[Edited 2007-05-30 14:06:35]


The first thing we do, let's kill all the lawyers.
User currently offlineN587NK From United States of America, joined Jun 2005, 300 posts, RR: 1
Reply 7, posted (7 years 2 months 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 4226 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting Deaphen (Reply 2):
Quoting N587NK (Reply 1):
well in the US per FAA regulations all transmitting and recieving devices may not be used in flight. and cell phones and wireless email devices may only be used if the wireless connection has been disabled. However I'm not sure about tother countries regs.

Apparantly its allowed if used over 10,000 feet.

I understand that, I'm just stating my company's policy(when an airline has a policy it in a way becomes an FAR) Now tell me how the F/A will not whats transmitting and recieving a signal? My airline has recently started the whole for F/As that we're "enformers not enforcers" so take it as it is..............


User currently offlineSkyGourmet From Germany, joined Jun 2006, 121 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (7 years 2 months 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 4202 times:

I have made the experience that Garmin handheld GPS devices are better than those from Magellan particularly because they're easier to use. The Garmin eTrex series is be the best choice for you in my opinion, some models are also available with color displays and the possibility to download detailed maps into the device.




Meine dispatcher says there's something wrong mit deine Kabel?
User currently offlineDavid L From United Kingdom, joined May 1999, 9523 posts, RR: 42
Reply 9, posted (7 years 2 months 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 4173 times:

Quoting SkyGourmet (Reply 8):
some models are also available with color displays and the possibility to download detailed maps into the device.

I have the Garmin GPSmap76 and GPSmap76C. The older 76 is cheaper but has a monochrome display, slow serial interface and not much memory.

The 76C has a colour display, a USB interface and much more memory (so you can store more maps). On the downside, the display is a bit smaller than that of the older 76 and you can't make the data fields as small as you could on the 76, so you end up with less map displayed.

The 76C seems to have been replaced by the 76Cx, which stores maps on an SD card rather than internal memory. More at:

https://buy.garmin.com/shop/shop.do?cID=145


User currently offlineChase From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 1054 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (7 years 2 months 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 4109 times:

Ditto what MaidensGator said above. Some airlines allow them (over 10,000') and some don't allow them at all.

I had a Garmin eTrex Venture, and recently upgraded to a Garmin eTrex Venture C. They work well if you hold them against the window - I usually try to put the top of the GPS against the bottom of the window. I've never had anybody ask about them, although I usually hold my GPS, iPod, and one side of a magazine with my window-side hand and the other side of the magazine with my aisle-side hand, so maybe the F/A just doesn't see the GPS. That's kind of why I do it that way.

The eTrex ones, except the yellow one, contain a basemap that will contain major roads all interstate highways, and borders between countries, states, and land/water, but not every little residential street. I'm speaking in reference to the US here - to get maps of India, you may have to buy an add-on CD-ROM. These cost an additional $90. Without the map, it's kind of hard to tell where you are, but you can certainly see your altitude, speed, and a line behind you representing the path you've taken.


User currently offlineDeaphen From India, joined Jul 2005, 1425 posts, RR: 1
Reply 11, posted (7 years 2 months 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 4069 times:

Quoting Chase (Reply 10):
The eTrex ones, except the yellow one, contain a basemap that will contain major roads all interstate highways, and borders between countries, states, and land/water, but not every little residential street. I'm speaking in reference to the US here - to get maps of India, you may have to buy an add-on CD-ROM. These cost an additional $90. Without the map, it's kind of hard to tell where you are, but you can certainly see your altitude, speed, and a line behind you representing the path you've taken.

And how important is memory space?? Most of the affordable ones have a measely 1mb internal storage... can someone elaborate on why more memory is good?

nitin



I want every single airport and airplane in India to be on A.net!
User currently offlineChase From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 1054 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (7 years 2 months 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 3953 times:

Quoting Deaphen (Reply 11):
can someone elaborate on why more memory is good?

Sure. The biggest use of a GPS's memory is to store maps. I said above which GPS I have. My map CD is nearly 10 years old, and is called "US Roads and Recreation", which lists every single street in the US. You download these maps onto your GPS on a county-by-county basis. My old GPS could hold about 8 counties at a time (not much!). The new one will hold about 60-70. However, they both have the "basemap" of major roads built in. By major roads I generally mean ones large enough to have multiple lanes in each direction, and stoplights. Like Broadway in NYC, Wacker in Chicago, Manchester in STL, El Camino Real in SFO, etc. Honestly if you're only using it while flying on a commercial airliner, and just want to know what towns are below you and don't really care about every little 3-house street, you probably don't need the CD-ROM, just the basemap.

Another use of memory is to store the track points. Some people call these "breadcrumbs" (a reference to the story of Hansel and Gretel). My old GPS could store about 5 hours worth of trackpoints, and my new one can store quite a bit more - enough for all air- and car-travel during an average week-long vacation. So, on the screen of the GPS, you can see where you've been. I also like to download the track points to my computer and make aggregate maps of all the places I've been on various trips. Check out http://jon.jonandchristine.dyndns.or...ps/googleMaps/GPS/breadcrumbs2.php but zoom out 4 or 5 times. Blue/purple/red/yellow/green = airplane cruise speed/slow airplane/fast car/medium car/slow car or walking speed.

Edit: And brown represents car trips taken before I owned a GPS, so I just manually entered those points into the computer.

[Edited 2007-05-30 18:49:57]

User currently offlineLHRGregSE4 From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2006, 24 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (7 years 2 months 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 3866 times:

I used my Nokia N95 enrute from London to Montreal. I had the cell phone option turned off. Since the device was just receieving signals that are already in the air I can't see how this would affect the aircraft in any bad way.

It worked great and I got a lock within a minute.


User currently offlineChase From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 1054 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (7 years 2 months 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 3841 times:

Quoting LHRGregSE4 (Reply 13):
Since the device was just receieving signals that are already in the air I can't see how this would affect the aircraft in any bad way

Some airlines ban them, some don't. I had it explained to me once as "as a side affect of receiving, a device will transmit just a little bit" but I don't know how accurate that is. But I'll admit that I don't understand how a GPS receiving a signal (allowed on some airlines) is different than an FM radio receiving a signal (banned on all airlines IIRC).


User currently offlineGreg3322 From United States of America, joined Aug 2004, 205 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (7 years 1 month 4 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 3780 times:

American Airlines specifically bans them. Delta specifically allows the (above 10,000 feet). United does't say one way or the other, but I flight attendant freak out that I had one (pre-9/11), That same trip, I had asked the captain if it was ok to use, and he said no problem. He even asked me how it worked on my way out.

I have used a Garmin GPS12 with ok results. Like others have said, you have to be by a window, and in the US, be on the south side of the plane. I also have a Garmin GPS for my laptop. This works much better, as it has a small antenna that I can hold up to the window and a nice big map display.

Greg


User currently offlineTLG From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 369 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (7 years 1 month 4 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 3775 times:

I have a DeLorme GPS receiver that I use with the Street Atlas software on my laptop. I sometimes have a little trouble getting a lock in an airliner, but if I hold it right up to the window it works great! It's fun to see what towns & highways we're passing over.

-TLG


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