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Joined Flight School - Help Me Choose Plane!  
User currently offlineAircatalonia From Spain, joined Nov 2007, 546 posts, RR: 0
Posted (6 years 6 months 22 hours ago) and read 4188 times:

So I finally took the decision to pursue my dream of becoming a pilot and joined the local flight school.  Smile

Now I have to choose plane and I have the following possibilities:

Tecnam P92

Cessna 152

Robin HR 20

And then the more expensive ones:

Cessna 172 N

Cessna 172 R

Cessna 172 S

Which planes do you think are more suitable for training? Do you think it is worth the investment to go for a 172 or a 152 should do?

Thanks!

26 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineFuturecaptain From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (6 years 6 months 20 hours ago) and read 4168 times:



Quoting Aircatalonia (Thread starter):
Tecnam P92

Cessna 152

Robin HR 20

I don't know anything about the Tecnam or Robin, but I did get my private license in a C-152. It's a forgiving plane, easy to fly, although a little small on the inside. The redeeming quality of the 152 is the rental rates are usually extremely cheap which will save you money, extremely useful if you are paying for this out of pocket.

Quoting Aircatalonia (Thread starter):
Cessna 172 N

Cessna 172 R

Cessna 172 S

I have flown the R and S models of the C-172. Great interior compared to the 152 in my opinion. The plane will be a good 20 kts faster in cruise over the 152. One other advantage is if you continue with this and get an instrument rating you can do that in a 172 also and already knowing the speeds the plane flies at and the systems will save you a few flights later on in the transition period getting to know the aircraft. Also after you get your license if you want to take more than 1 person up at a time, like you would in a 152, you already know the plane.

I'd say go with the 172 if you plan on continuing this through your instrument rating and commercial or if you need the extra room. If you and your instructor fit in a 152, underweight, then go for it. You will probably save 30-40% off the rental rates and have more money left over in the end to get checked out in a 172 after you have your license if you so desire.


User currently offline2H4 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 8955 posts, RR: 60
Reply 2, posted (6 years 6 months 18 hours ago) and read 4155 times:
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Quoting Aircatalonia (Thread starter):
Do you think it is worth the investment to go for a 172 or a 152 should do?

Futurecaptain hit the nail on the head. I've flown both models, and agree with every point he made.

Your size will have a lot to do with it. If you're average or larger-sized, and if your instructor is the same, you might want to ante up for the 172 in the name of comfort.

While standardization is beneficial in terms of the shift to instrument training, I personally enjoy learning different aircraft. I love having to learn new systems, procedures, and handling techniques, so I take every opportunity to learn a new model.

To me, the 152 feels like an airplane you strap on. It's lighter on the controls and feels more precise. The 172 is great, but compared to the 152, it feels fatter, slower, and more numb in terms of handling. I'm thinking of crosswind landings in particular.

Having flown many different models of the 172, including the R, I am of the opinion that the newer and more expensive R and S models aren't really worth the extra money. The interiors are more modern, and they're quieter, but to me, they're no more fun or enjoyable to fly. Plus, I rather enjoy the older planes in general. It's tough to beat cream and orange vinyl interior with chrome accents.  biggrin 

Finally, a 150/152 tip. If one of your feet starts to get numb and fall asleep, remove your wallet.

2H4



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User currently offlineSWAOPSusafATC From United States of America, joined Dec 2005, 118 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (6 years 6 months 16 hours ago) and read 4143 times:

If weight is not a problem between you and your instructor and eventually you and the local examiner I would go with the C152. It is cheaper and when you get the private license you can just get checked out in a hour or 2 in the 172. I don't know the other planes well enough to add info about them.

Swaops


User currently offlineFuturecaptain From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (6 years 6 months 16 hours ago) and read 4139 times:



Quoting 2H4 (Reply 2):
It's lighter on the controls and feels more precise.

True. After 80 hours strictly flying a 152 for my private license the first time I flew a 172 the controls felt heavy and harder to move. Also the extra weight of the 172 helps with turbulence, the heavier plane is less likely to be bounced around as much. If airsickness becomes a problem, you may want to try the bigger plane.

Quoting 2H4 (Reply 2):
I am of the opinion that the newer and more expensive R and S models aren't really worth the extra money.

Blasphemy!  Smile

Quoting 2H4 (Reply 2):
Finally, a 150/152 tip. If one of your feet starts to get numb and fall asleep, remove your wallet.

I've had that happen, could never figure out why. It hurts like he** trying to fly a plane when your foot goes numb. I'll try this out next time.


User currently offlineAirCatalonia From Spain, joined Nov 2007, 546 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (6 years 6 months 13 hours ago) and read 4126 times:

Hey guys, thanks for the advice.

I already gave them a call and told them I will go with the 152. I'm an average sized guy (tall but thin) so room should not be too much of a problem. I'll just remove everything from my pockets before squeezing my way into the tiny cessna.  Wink

On monday I am having my initiation flight. It's a 45 minute flight to basically get familiar with the aircraft and do some very basic manouvers both in the air and on the ground to feel the controls for the first time. That is what I was told. I've not had any theory yet so I guess it won't be much more than that. Anyway, I'm already looking forward to my first time in the front seat.  Smile

I'll let you know how was my first aerial experience  Wink I'm really excited.

aircatalonia


User currently onlinePe@rson From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2001, 19188 posts, RR: 52
Reply 6, posted (6 years 6 months 13 hours ago) and read 4122 times:

Hope all goes well, AirC.

Sorry to hijack your thread with my own question:

Do you reckon it´s worth pursuing a PPL (it would be in the UK) if you could only afford one or two flying lessons per month. Sorry for no question mark: this darn computer doesn´t have the key.



"Everyone writing for the Telegraph knows that the way to grab eyeballs is with Ryanair and/or sex."
User currently offlineAF340 From Canada, joined Jul 2007, 2786 posts, RR: 4
Reply 7, posted (6 years 6 months 12 hours ago) and read 4115 times:



Quoting Pe@rson (Reply 6):
Do you reckon it´s worth pursuing a PPL (it would be in the UK) if you could only afford one or two flying lessons per month. Sorry for no question mark: this darn computer doesn´t have the key.

I do that pretty much only because of wx conditions. VFR sucks in Canada! It will, of course, take you longer, but only a couple years at most.



Liam spin 


User currently onlinePe@rson From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2001, 19188 posts, RR: 52
Reply 8, posted (6 years 6 months 12 hours ago) and read 4112 times:



Quoting AF340 (Reply 7):
It will, of course, take you longer, but only a couple years at most.

Yep. Which means I´ll probably not advance so quickly, which means I would ultimately spend more on getting my PPL.

However, if it´s a choice between starting at a later date, say 5 years away, and doing it pretty intensively (in theory), or starting pretty soon, e.g. in 7 months, and having one or two lessons a month, which would you choose and why?



"Everyone writing for the Telegraph knows that the way to grab eyeballs is with Ryanair and/or sex."
User currently offline2H4 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 8955 posts, RR: 60
Reply 9, posted (6 years 6 months 12 hours ago) and read 4111 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
DATABASE EDITOR



Quoting AirCatalonia (Reply 5):
I'll let you know how was my first aerial experience Wink I'm really excited.

Do keep us posted, AirCatalonia. I'm looking forward to hearing updates.  yes 

Quoting Pe@rson (Reply 6):
Do you reckon it´s worth pursuing a PPL (it would be in the UK) if you could only afford one or two flying lessons per month.

Two thoughts:

1) No training is worthless. With the right attitude and the right mindset, you'll learn something from every flight. In my opinion, this in and of itself makes for an enjoyable use of time and money.

2) While no training is worthless, the effectiveness of training can vary greatly. Flying one or two lessons per month will result in very, very little progress toward a certificate or rating. Half or more of each lesson will be spent reviewing the last lesson and "brushing the rust off", as opposed to building upon what you've learned.

Think of it this way - if each lesson is a step forward, each week of non-flying is a half-step backward.

Flying one or two lessons per month will teach you things, but at that rate, your progress toward a certificate or rating will move forward at the pace of a glacier. If the goal is simply to fly and learn for the sake of flying and learning, that's fine....but if the goal is to earn a certificate or rating, training at this pace will end up costing much more in the long run.

2H4



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User currently onlinePe@rson From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2001, 19188 posts, RR: 52
Reply 10, posted (6 years 6 months 12 hours ago) and read 4108 times:

Thanks, 2H4. That puts it all into perspective.


"Everyone writing for the Telegraph knows that the way to grab eyeballs is with Ryanair and/or sex."
User currently offline2H4 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 8955 posts, RR: 60
Reply 11, posted (6 years 6 months 12 hours ago) and read 4103 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
DATABASE EDITOR



Quoting Pe@rson (Reply 8):
if it´s a choice between starting at a later date, say 5 years away, and doing it pretty intensively (in theory), or starting pretty soon, e.g. in 7 months, and having one or two lessons a month, which would you choose and why?

Question for you, Pe@rson - what is your goal?

If your goal is to progress through your ratings and eventually fly for a living, than efficiency...in terms of both time and money...really should be taken into account.

If your goal is simply to earn your PPL and fly for the enjoyment of flying, there's really no rush. Taking it slowly and investing in more dual (in the long run) can be enjoyable.

Case in point - I took my sweet time getting my PPL. Part of it was due to the dismal Michigan weather, but a lot of it was due to the fact that I was involved in a very enjoyable flying club. I'd hang out at the club and sometimes go up with people with no rigid lesson plan in mind. I also had a couple of years before my more advanced training began.

So I took my time. I'd grab my instructor and go work on various things in a relaxed manner. We'd make an afternoon out of it and go grab lunch, perhaps working on maneuvers on the way out, and pilotage and dead reckoning on the way back.

We'd hop over to bigger, more complex airports for pattern work for the experience. It may have cost more time and money to spend 30 minutes in transit to that larger airport, but I got a great feel for busy frequencies, heavy traffic, parallel runways, and all the things a smaller airport lacks.

It certainly wasn't the most efficient use of my time or money, but at the time, I had a good amount of both. As a result, my training provided me with very interesting real-world experiences and quality time with good friends, as well as with the expected technical training.

It cost more, but I don't regret a minute of it.

2H4



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User currently onlinePe@rson From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2001, 19188 posts, RR: 52
Reply 12, posted (6 years 6 months 11 hours ago) and read 4100 times:

Thanks again, 2H4. Very informative.

Quoting 2H4 (Reply 11):
Pe@rson - what is your goal?

Just getting my PPL for fun/enjoyment. I won´t be flying as a career. You see, I´m returning to university (age 26!) this Sept (I´ll be doing Airline Management, so that´ll be my career) and I´m just contemplating whether to do my PPL training during that period (I could afford to do it monthly or bimonthly) or to wait until I´ve got my new career and have sufficient cash to do it quicker. Hmm. Lots to think about!



"Everyone writing for the Telegraph knows that the way to grab eyeballs is with Ryanair and/or sex."
User currently offlineZBBYLW From Canada, joined Nov 2006, 1982 posts, RR: 6
Reply 13, posted (6 years 5 months 4 weeks 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 4070 times:



Quoting AirCatalonia (Reply 5):

I did all my training on a 152 and I am 6'4 and 200 ibs... its a tight squeeze but I much preferred the 152 to a 172. Now if you could land a Citabria, I would say go for that for sure!

Quoting Pe@rson (Reply 8):
However, if it´s a choice between starting at a later date, say 5 years away, and doing it pretty intensively (in theory), or starting pretty soon, e.g. in 7 months, and having one or two lessons a month, which would you choose and why?

Well like 2H4 had mentioned its a trade off. I did mine as intensively as the weather would allow, I was always on the ball and ready for the next lesson, half way through however the weather crapped out on me for 3 weeks (low ceiling, icing etc...) my first flight back was a little rusty. With experience behind you however you do not really get that rusty within the same time frame. For me I can now go a month without flying and feel comfortable in an aircraft (1 month is the longest I have gone without flying since getting my PPL 2 years ago). If I were you I would consider waiting, however if you are anything like me, I know you would just want to go out there and fly, fly, fly. Simply put do what you want... If you want to save the money and time, wait untill you are ready, if you want to fly, fly, fly, I would suggest starting soon!



Keep the shinny side up!
User currently offlineSwiftski From Australia, joined Dec 2006, 2701 posts, RR: 2
Reply 14, posted (6 years 5 months 4 weeks 1 day ago) and read 4068 times:

I flew a C152 for the first time yesterday, ex Manston, and loved it. Very easy to fly.



User currently offlineAirCatalonia From Spain, joined Nov 2007, 546 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (6 years 5 months 4 weeks 18 hours ago) and read 4044 times:



Quoting Swiftski (Reply 14):
I flew a C152 for the first time yesterday, ex Manston, and loved it. Very easy to fly.

I'll be doing that tomorrow morning! Big grin


User currently offlineN231YE From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 16, posted (6 years 5 months 4 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 4039 times:

No PA-38s or PA-28s? What kind of flight school is this?!  eek 

User currently offline2H4 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 8955 posts, RR: 60
Reply 17, posted (6 years 5 months 4 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 4038 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
DATABASE EDITOR



Quoting N231YE (Reply 16):
No PA-38s or PA-28s? What kind of flight school is this?!

One with good taste!  duck 

I kid, I kid....I'm just more of a Cessna guy.

2H4



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User currently offlineN231YE From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 18, posted (6 years 5 months 4 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 4033 times:

Quoting 2H4 (Reply 17):
One with good taste!   

I kid, I kid....I'm just more of a Cessna guy.

I like the feeling of an airplane beneath my seat, not one of a foam model airplane  wink 

[Edited 2008-01-27 09:41:31]

User currently offline2H4 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 8955 posts, RR: 60
Reply 19, posted (6 years 5 months 4 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 4027 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
DATABASE EDITOR



Quoting N231YE (Reply 18):
I like the feeling of an airplane beneath my seat

Pity a four-foot-thick wing is there, instead.  Wink

Personally, I like the feeling of floats and tundra tires beneath my seat, but rarely can Piper pilots relate to such coolness.

 biggrin 

2H4



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User currently onlinePe@rson From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2001, 19188 posts, RR: 52
Reply 20, posted (6 years 5 months 4 weeks 13 hours ago) and read 4016 times:

Thanks 2H4 and ZBB!

I could afford 2 lessons per month in winter, spring and autumn, and either 3 or 4 per month during the summer. Thus, I could hopefully obtain my PPL in 2 years (based on about 50 lessons). That isn´t, I suppose, too bad.

I´d probably choose the C152 for training over the PA28.

Of course, I need to get my CAA-approved medicial before I proceed – and I´m hoping my eyesight (I wear contacts) will be acceptable.

Now, I´m British and would be training in the UK. Despite most replies from Americans and Canadians, I´d appreciate your answers to the following questions:

1) I´d probably choose a flying school at East Midlands Airport (close to where I´ll be living from this September). It´s a relatively busy airport, with medium-sized jets. Would that environment be OK for training?

2) Once I´m qualified, what single-engine aircraft would I be permitted to fly? I´m confused about this.

Anyway, looking ahead, I´m hoping, if all goes to plan, to gain my night-, IMC-, and multi-engine ratings in about the next 5 years. Ambitious, especially as I haven´t yet even begun my PPL, but that´s what I´m presently thinking about for the longer-term. Of course, that´s some distance away.

Cheers all!

James.



"Everyone writing for the Telegraph knows that the way to grab eyeballs is with Ryanair and/or sex."
User currently offline2H4 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 8955 posts, RR: 60
Reply 21, posted (6 years 5 months 4 weeks 11 hours ago) and read 4005 times:
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DATABASE EDITOR



Quoting Pe@rson (Reply 20):
I´d probably choose the C152 for training over the PA28.

 highfive 

Quoting Pe@rson (Reply 20):
1) I´d probably choose a flying school at East Midlands Airport (close to where I´ll be living from this September). It´s a relatively busy airport, with medium-sized jets. Would that environment be OK for training?

I think it depends a lot on the number of operations per hour or per day. If it's fairly busy, you'll likely end up spending a lot of time and concentration dealing with traffic. Looking for other airplanes, extending your downwind, holding short on the taxiway, etc. While these are all good things to learn and become proficient at, I suspect they would intrude upon your learning the fundamentals.

That said, just have a chat with one of the local instructors. They'll know. It could be that they take primary students up all the time, and simply hop over to a sleepy airfield nearby. Regardless, I'm sure they've got a system figured out. A flight school that trains primary students wouldn't be in business otherwise.


Quoting Pe@rson (Reply 20):
2) Once I´m qualified, what single-engine aircraft would I be permitted to fly? I´m confused about this.

Not sure on the regs on your side of the pond, but over here, your PPL will qualify you to fly any single-engine propeller-driven aircraft under 12,500 pounds, with some exceptions:

- If you want to fly an airplane with retractable landing gear, you'd need to do a bit of training and get a "complex" endorsement.
- To fly an airplane with over 180hp, you'd need to get a "high-performance" endorsement.
- To fly an airplane with a tailwheel, you'd need a tailwheel endorsement.
- To fly a pressurized airplane, you'd need a "high altitude" endorsement.

Oh, and for the record, the fabric Pipers are cool, and are generally excluded from my snarky anti-Piper remarks.  Wink

2H4



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User currently offlineN231YE From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 22, posted (6 years 5 months 4 weeks 11 hours ago) and read 4000 times:



Quoting Pe@rson (Reply 20):
I´d probably choose the C152 for training over the PA28.

My condolences  wink 


User currently onlinePe@rson From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2001, 19188 posts, RR: 52
Reply 23, posted (6 years 5 months 4 weeks 11 hours ago) and read 3998 times:

Thanks, folks.

Quoting N231YE (Reply 22):
Quoting Pe@rson (Reply 20):
I´d probably choose the C152 for training over the PA28.

My condolences

LOL. I am presently basing my preference on one thing: money.  Big grin When I need a more poweful machine, I´ll upgrade. But for training, slow and cheap are good. :P



"Everyone writing for the Telegraph knows that the way to grab eyeballs is with Ryanair and/or sex."
User currently offline2H4 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 8955 posts, RR: 60
Reply 24, posted (6 years 5 months 4 weeks 10 hours ago) and read 3993 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
DATABASE EDITOR



Quoting Pe@rson (Reply 23):
But for training, slow and cheap are good.

So are effective flaps.  biggrin 

2H4



Intentionally Left Blank
25 Post contains images Scooter01 : -Ever flown a Piper Colt? Scooter01
26 Post contains images AirCatalonia : I just arrived from the airport and loved it too. Agreed 100%. Plus I was very lucky with the weather today: clear and winds calm. I am already lookin
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