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A Cabin Crew Question, Manners?  
User currently offlineReadytotaxi From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2006, 3265 posts, RR: 2
Posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 2 days 1 hour ago) and read 6913 times:

To you wonderful people out there who day after day look after us I was wondering if you had noticed an increase or a decline in manners, "Please & Thank you"
Is it more noticeable in different parts of the cabin, First,Club Economy.
Or is it and age thing, perhaps certain countries are better at it than others?

Just wondered what you noticed being at the front line.  Smile


you don't get a second chance to make a first impression!
34 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlinePlaneguy727 From United States of America, joined Mar 2007, 1247 posts, RR: 1
Reply 1, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 2 days ago) and read 6820 times:

I don't know about the F/As, but as a passenger I try my very best to say hello on boarding, say please and thank you, and wish the crew a pleasant (morning, afternoon, evening) when exiting the aircraft.

You all work very hard and should be better appreciated for your efforts!



I want to live in an old and converted 727...
User currently offlinePanAm747 From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 4242 posts, RR: 8
Reply 2, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 2 days ago) and read 6773 times:



Quote:
I don't know about the F/As, but as a passenger I try my very best to say hello on boarding, say please and thank you, and wish the crew a pleasant (morning, afternoon, evening) when exiting the aircraft.

Agreed - there is NO excuse for bad manners, no matter how badly your day has been. A little courtesy goes a LONG way!!

Quote:
You all work very hard and should be better appreciated for your efforts!

Again, doubly agree!! Unfortunately, most flight attendants nowadays have to be vicious, mean, and cruel hall monitors making sure that the passengers attempting to avoid the checked bag fees by taking the kitchen sink in their carry-on don't become bin hogs and force others to check bags. I'm sorry that it has come to this - I do feel sorry for you!!



Pan Am:The World's Most Experienced Airline - P(oor) S(ailor's) A(irline): San Diego's Hometown Airline-Catch Our Smile!
User currently onlineStitch From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 31011 posts, RR: 86
Reply 3, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 2 days ago) and read 6743 times:
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As a passenger monitoring my fellows, I don't see much in the way of "bad" behavior, but I do see a great deal of "indifferent" behavior.

And by that I mean the "little courtesies". When greeted at boarding, people not acknowledging the greeting (though the majority do). When meal selection is being taken, folks just give their requests with no "thank you" at the end. No "yes, please" when asked for refills on sides or drinks, just a nod or grunt or even just raising the glass towards them.

I don't see it as a "servant mentality" but more as a "service mentality". The FAs are viewed as there to provide a service and as long as they are providing it, there is no reason to interact with them in a more sociable or...gracious...manner.


User currently offlineMauiman31 From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 450 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 2 days ago) and read 6722 times:
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Quoting Planeguy727 (Reply 1):
as a passenger I try my very best to say hello on boarding, say please and thank you, and wish the crew a pleasant (morning, afternoon, evening) when exiting the aircraft.

Me too. I always greet the crew at boarding, if possible, even if they don't initiate it. And offer "thank you" and "please" for service - sitting up front or in back. And yes, my observation (and I primarily travel US domestic) is that I am in the minority in doing so.

Quoting PanAm747 (Reply 2):
there is NO excuse for bad manners, no matter how badly your day has been. A little courtesy goes a LONG way!!

Yes!!!!


User currently offlineTomFoolery From Austria, joined Jan 2004, 529 posts, RR: 2
Reply 5, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 6631 times:

There are a lot of passengers, who have flown many years, who remember how the industry used to be. They have seen the services offered by the airlines slowly erode away.

The offerings of the US airlines are on par with the train. Where there is nothing left to make the consumer feel welcome on board, it is no wonder that travelers have become so jaded.

Your first exposure is to a cold internet page. Then, at the airport, you are referred to a computer terminal, and invited to check yourself in. In the event that you manage to evade the kiosk, the check-in line guard will point you to a seemingly endless line, which is YOURS. As you finally make your way to the counter, the agent ruthlessly quizzes you as to why you chose to bother him or her, rather than using the kiosk. As you go for your boarding pass, the agent pauses and says, that bag will be $25, and we don't accept AMEX. Cash? Oh, they don't make change, you will need to go to the ticketing counter "down there".

Once ticketed, you go through a security check, and as luck would have it, has 2 laptops, and countless other crap along with him, and of course- he needs 3 tries to make it through the metal detector, only after taking forever to unpack all of his electronic gear at the last minute.

Boarding time. Ladies and gentlemen, now boarding rows 35-47. Now rows 1-33. "Im sorry, we have not called row 34. Please take a seat, and allow others passage." As you make the walk-of-shame to the seat 'over there', your row is called.

Welcome on board, sir. We are sorry, all bins are full. We will need to check that for you. Unfortunately, that will be $15.
"WTF?" you inquire. "Normally it would be $25, but in your case, we are willing to give you a break....

While good manners and civilized behavior should be the norm, please understand that when there is nothing good to say, sometimes it pays to say as little as possible. We know it is not the FA. Rather it is the product that the FA and the rest of the crew represent.

With today"s technology, sometimes the crew's greeting sinks into the same oblivion as does the "thanks for booking your tickets with www.airtickets.com"

tom



Paper makes an airplane fly
User currently offlineA318 From Bahamas, joined Jan 2008, 332 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 6570 times:

Let me put it like this- last week I got up from my jumpseat after take off to start the service and on my way back to the galley, a man snapped his fingers at me and told me to get him a sprite. That was the one time I actually flat out said no to a passenger request.


Welcome aboard!
User currently offlineTDubJFK From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 6536 times:



Quoting PanAm747 (Reply 2):
Unfortunately, most flight attendants nowadays have to be vicious, mean, and cruel hall monitors making sure that the passengers attempting to avoid the checked bag fees by taking the kitchen sink in their carry-on don't become bin hogs and force others to check bags. I'm sorry that it has come to this - I do feel sorry for you!!

No, F/As don't "have" to become vicious, mean, cruel hall monitors as you put it. It's only the bad ones out there that feel it's their right to act this way. The real professional ones realize that you don't treat your paying customers that way. There is never an excuse for any customer service employee regardless of the type of business ever barking at a customer.

And remember - flying sucks worst for the passengers. The people paying for the "privilege" or being transported like cattle and being nickled and dimed to death at the same time.


User currently offlineWAC From United States of America, joined Nov 2008, 275 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 6486 times:

I first always say thank you and please and I try most of the time to say in the native tongue of the carrier. Also I think it is very important to take off you earphones when being served by the crew...this respect. At the end of flight I always say thank you very much...regardless of service standard or if it s a low cost or full service...flight crew are human beings and you
should respect them as human beings even AZ crew!


User currently offlinePanAm747 From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 4242 posts, RR: 8
Reply 9, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 6453 times:

TDub, I'm going to strongly disagree on both points. Being a flight attendant now means that instead of welcoming aboard passengers, you have to explain to virtually every single passenger entering the plane why they can only put one bag up in the overhead, one thing under the seat in front of them, and then keep their coats on their laps throughout the entire flight.

That's because the airlines have decided to charge for everything, and in order to avoid a $15 checked-bag fee, passengers are bringing everything on-board, thinking there will be plenty of room for all their stuff up top. On my four flights, not only did the flight attendants have to say this over and over and over (and over and over and over!!), but they physically had to enforce this policy by stopping people from just piling stuff in.

As for them being vicious and cruel, from a passenger perspective it's rough being treated like Osama Bin Laden from the moment you walk through the airport to the time you're finally in the McDonald's paying $7 for a BigMac to the time you're told EXACTLY where to place items you brought on, I agree. However, if you had to be the enforcer of the most unpopular rules and procedures ever put forth on travellers, you'd be damn cranky yourself. The bean counters at the airlines may think that this is the greatest invention for airlines since getting rid of travel agents, but for flight attendants it has made their job hundreds of times worse.

I don't approve of the decisions, and I wish that flight attendants could be assistants in boarding instead of bin-hog monitors, but that's life in the airlines now. Extraordinarily sad.



Pan Am:The World's Most Experienced Airline - P(oor) S(ailor's) A(irline): San Diego's Hometown Airline-Catch Our Smile!
User currently offlineWNCrew From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 1473 posts, RR: 10
Reply 10, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 6449 times:



Quoting TDubJFK (Reply 7):
And remember - flying sucks worst for the passengers. The people paying for the "privilege" or being transported like cattle and being nickled and dimed to death at the same time.

To play devil's advocate... the passengers ARE the ones dictating the market based on what they are and ARE NOT willing to pay for. If the majority of the country were willing to pay a realistic fare from coast to coast (and not expect $200 to be the NORM... much-less a deal) then the airlines COULD offer more service. NOT that airlines aren't to share in the blame for mismanagement.... but there's some form of "blame" to be shared by BOTH sides.



ALL views, opinions expressed are mine ONLY and are NOT representative of those shared by Southwest Airlines Co.
User currently offlineSeaBosDca From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 5479 posts, RR: 6
Reply 11, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 6416 times:



Quoting TDubJFK (Reply 7):
There is never an excuse for any customer service employee regardless of the type of business ever barking at a customer.

This is the mentality that makes customer service an impossible business. It's wrong, but it seems to have taken firm hold in America.

Any business transaction is a two-way street, to which both sides need to consent. The customer is not lord and master because he happens to be providing the cash rather than the service in the transaction. If more service providers would enforce rules against misbehaving customers, instead of shrugging their shoulders and saying "the customer is always right," life would be much better for 99% of customers and staff alike.

Imagine how much nicer air travel would be if customers knew their carry-ons actually had to fit, or that they would be denied boarding if they tried to board early, and didn't try stupid tricks as a reslt.


User currently offlineWNCrew From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 1473 posts, RR: 10
Reply 12, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 6317 times:



Quoting SeaBosDca (Reply 11):

Imagine how much nicer air travel would be if customers knew their carry-ons actually had to fit, or that they would be denied boarding if they tried to board early, and didn't try stupid tricks as a reslt.

While I DO think the airlines could do a much better job even to the NICE customers, but I think you're onto something. You know as much as I read here on A.net, I NEVER read a post from a pax admitting to EVER doing wrong. As a crewmember I FULLY admit that some of my colleagues probably shouldn't be in the customer service industry and that certain situations probably could've been handled better but nobody ever admits to making their own experience worse, nobody ever admits to being difficult to the crew, to bring MORE than their share of carryons... etc etc.

If people really REALLY made an effort to be pleasant, FOLLOW THE RULES (instead of trying to convince FA's and the airline that they don't apply to them) and just generally followed outlined guidelines... I think service overall would improve! It's VERY much a two-way street and I think it would make a difference.

.....and before ANYONE accuses me of "siding with the airline), remember; ALL crew have been pax, but not all pax have been CREW. I truly DO see both sides of the story, and the old adage, "The customer is always right" applied only in 1950 when people dressed, behaved and expected appropriately. Nowadays people throw it around and it's no longer fitting of our current society.



ALL views, opinions expressed are mine ONLY and are NOT representative of those shared by Southwest Airlines Co.
User currently offlineGT4EZY From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2007, 1789 posts, RR: 3
Reply 13, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 6274 times:

It really does depend on the type of passenger and the route aswell.

In general, most passengers will acknowledge my greeting on boarding. Some choose not to acknowledge. Sometimes this is because they are shy or some other reason but not neccessarily because they mean to be rude. In this type of instance I always ask an open ended question to which they usually have to answer. There are then some "stroppy" arsy types who just choose to ignore you because they just don't want to acknowledge you.....until they want something. Then the shoe is on the other foot.  Wink

Believe it or not, again generally speaking, I often find that the rudest passengers are those between say 45 and 65.

As for enforcing rules and regs; passengers don't often see the whole picture and they sometimes just don't understand. With others, they just plain hate being told what to do however nice you might ask them.



Proud to fly from Manchester!
User currently offlineLoveTheSkies From United States of America, joined Dec 2008, 55 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 6264 times:



Quoting Readytotaxi (Thread starter):
To you wonderful people out there who day after day look after us I was wondering if you had noticed an increase or a decline in manners, "Please & Thank you"
Is it more noticeable in different parts of the cabin, First,Club Economy.
Or is it and age thing, perhaps certain countries are better at it than others?

No more or less than anywhere else in society. A jerk is a jerk, is a jerk!!
I don't stoop to their level. I was raised well and I have manners. Just about every passenger I welcome on the aircraft has a smile for me, a warm "Hello", or a "How are you today?" The ones that don't, don't ruffle my feathers! It's their loss. I think of them as being miserable for one reason or another and I pity them instead of getting myself worked up over it. A lot of times they come around and walk off smiling.


User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 19734 posts, RR: 59
Reply 15, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 6229 times:



Quoting WNCrew (Reply 10):

To play devil's advocate... the passengers ARE the ones dictating the market based on what they are and ARE NOT willing to pay for.

And WN manages to satisfy that market while keeping happy, smiling, polite, friendly employees.

How do they do that?


User currently offlineSpeedbirdie From United Kingdom, joined May 2006, 917 posts, RR: 52
Reply 16, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 6197 times:

Wow I wish I had all you guys on some of my flights.
I am really sick of passengers these days being rude and treating us like
we are there to just plainly serve their needs.
It made my week yesterday when a little girl got on board, about 6 years old
and gave me a hug and a huge smile! Wow..
What happened to manners, courtesy and respect?  Sad



Never give up..
User currently offlineFlyEmirates From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 17, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 6143 times:



Quoting A318 (Reply 6):
a man snapped his fingers at me and told me to get him a sprite

Best not to work at EK, my recent MAN had about 500 instances of that, with a call bell ringing every 3 seconds, with a 'give me' 'i want' 'i need'. Manners have gone out the window, so have the smiles. Flying isnt what it once was


User currently offlineGDB From United Kingdom, joined May 2001, 13211 posts, RR: 77
Reply 18, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 6105 times:



Quoting Speedbirdie (Reply 16):
I am really sick of passengers these days being rude and treating us like
we are there to just plainly serve their needs.
It made my week yesterday when a little girl got on board, about 6 years old
and gave me a hug and a huge smile! Wow..

This innocent has yet, perhaps, to develop the self centered/self-righteous, jadedness, 'out of my way' attitude, exposure to anti airline propaganda (especially for your one!) of many adults.
And, putting my amateur shrink head on, maybe not influenced by the 'bullying is funny and good' stance of certain 'reality' shows.


User currently offlineWNCrew From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 1473 posts, RR: 10
Reply 19, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 6105 times:



Quoting DocLightning (Reply 15):
And WN manages to satisfy that market while keeping happy, smiling, polite, friendly employees.

How do they do that?

Because they teach us that the customer is NOT always right and that we shouldn't tolerate undue rudeness or noncompliance JUST because someone bought a ticket. By knowing we aren't expected to deal with jerks who are jerks just for the sake of being jerks it takes a lot of pressure off of our shoulders and makes us enjoy the work we do! It also makes us WANT to work harder for those who ARE kind, well-mannered and DO appreciate the work we do! That's how!



ALL views, opinions expressed are mine ONLY and are NOT representative of those shared by Southwest Airlines Co.
User currently offlineSeaBosDca From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 5479 posts, RR: 6
Reply 20, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 6089 times:



Quoting WNCrew (Reply 19):
Because they teach us that the customer is NOT always right and that we shouldn't tolerate undue rudeness or noncompliance JUST because someone bought a ticket. By knowing we aren't expected to deal with jerks who are jerks just for the sake of being jerks it takes a lot of pressure off of our shoulders and makes us enjoy the work we do! It also makes us WANT to work harder for those who ARE kind, well-mannered and DO appreciate the work we do! That's how!

This response makes me want to fly WN.  thumbsup  This is what customer service is about.

Now if 1) you all would fly to some useful airports and 2) you'd assign me a seat, I'd be right on it... Big grin


User currently offlineReadytotaxi From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2006, 3265 posts, RR: 2
Reply 21, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 5974 times:



Quoting Speedbirdie (Reply 16):

Nicely put, hope you are on my next flight, 2037 21stJan



you don't get a second chance to make a first impression!
User currently offlineShyFlyer From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 22, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 19 hours ago) and read 5923 times:



Quoting GDB (Reply 18):

Quoting Speedbirdie (Reply 16):
I am really sick of passengers these days being rude and treating us like
we are there to just plainly serve their needs.
It made my week yesterday when a little girl got on board, about 6 years old
and gave me a hug and a huge smile! Wow..

This innocent has yet, perhaps, to develop the self centered/self-righteous, jadedness, 'out of my way' attitude, exposure to anti airline propaganda (especially for your one!) of many adults.
And, putting my amateur shrink head on, maybe not influenced by the 'bullying is funny and good' stance of certain 'reality' shows.

I think you're pretty much right on the mark. And it's not only prevalent in air travel, but just about anywhere you go.

I hate the way this sounds, but I think generally speaking, society is becoming more and more arrogant and self-centered. All about me, everyone else be damned, so to speak.

People who complain about service should look at themselves first. It sounds cliche, but a smile and a sincire thank you go a long way. I've seen it in action.


User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 19734 posts, RR: 59
Reply 23, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 7 hours ago) and read 5866 times:



Quoting WNCrew (Reply 19):

Because they teach us that the customer is NOT always right and that we shouldn't tolerate undue rudeness or noncompliance JUST because someone bought a ticket. By knowing we aren't expected to deal with jerks who are jerks just for the sake of being jerks it takes a lot of pressure off of our shoulders and makes us enjoy the work we do! It also makes us WANT to work harder for those who ARE kind, well-mannered and DO appreciate the work we do! That's how!

 bigthumbsup 

Uh huh! It amazes me that more carriers don't look to WN more.


User currently offlineTDubJFK From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 24, posted (5 years 9 months 13 hours ago) and read 5629 times:



Quoting Speedbirdie (Reply 16):
What happened to manners, courtesy and respect?

As a F/A -or any customer service employee (which, I'm sorry to remind you that you are -first and foremost), .... you don't get what you don't give.

And as the employee in any customer service-type setting, it's your responsibility to create the atmosphere for your customer. So smile first. It's your job.


25 IAirAllie : I mostly have military pax these days when I am working and they have wonderful manners. I really appreciate the young men who thanked me for working
26 Airmale : Well, it really comes down to this: "BE THE CHANGE YOU WANT TO SEE!!!" Simple, no?
27 SkyGirl : This... is going to say a lot more than I'd like to. For the record, I would like to say that they didn't train me for 6 and a half weeks to serve a c
28 Mal787 : I always say hello good bye and thank you to all airline employees from check in through. on a recent Qantas flight form Sydney to London i made a poi
29 AirNewZealand : Mal, Let me first thankyou for the polite words you have said about us crew at Qantas!!! Im sure they will sincerely appreciate the kind words you ha
30 Mal787 : Hey ANZ I did make a point of thanking both guys personally but I then approached the CSM and the letter, so hopefully they got the message of thanks
31 FlyDeltaJets87 : I'll add my two cents here. Both passengers AND cabin crew need to understand that respect is a two way street. You have to give it to get it. It flow
32 IAirAllie : I can top that. A pax tugged on my sleeve so hard once it tore the seam. Granted it was a typical poorly manufactured uniform but still. If I am clos
33 SkyGirl : Lol, I don't think I could ever be accused of denying service (except to the lady going to Omaha) I just get irritated when people stop seeing me as
34 JFKMan : I disagree. I think, no matter what the modern world does, if you are on a flight with a good flight attendant, it will still be about service. Atlea
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