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Alcohol Being Served Onboard Aircraft  
User currently offlineYYZRWY23 From Canada, joined Aug 2009, 561 posts, RR: 0
Posted (4 years 12 months 2 days 16 hours ago) and read 3884 times:

Hello a.netters,

Last night I was listening to a talk-radio show in the car (CFRB 1010 for those of you familiar) and was listening to the Ryan Doyle show. After discussing the sentencing of one of the Toronto 18 he brought up the topic of removing alcohol from aircraft and possibly from the airport. It sparked quite the radio debate and I called in.

This is my take:

I think alcohol should be removed from aircraft because you are serving a substance that can easily be abused and can cause a dangerous and tense situation in a very contained environment. I know that most people can hold their alcohol or know when to stop but sometimes F/A's just let the alcohol flow and the person becomes a nuisance. When someone becomes dangerous and out of control on board it can require a diversion which costs the airlines some money and irritates all the other paxs. Regarding alcohol in the airport, I think it should be allowed as long as the Gate Agents are well trained in determining if a pax is fit to travel or if they should be denied boarding. That way the aircraft won't have any alcohol related problems once in the air.

I really want to generate a good debate and discussion here, so, what do you think?

YYZRWY23


If you don't stand behind our troops, feel free to stand in front of them.
7 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineForce13 From United States of America, joined Jun 2005, 229 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (4 years 12 months 2 days 16 hours ago) and read 3882 times:

Here's my personal take on the subject. I love aviation and I love airplanes. However I am not really a fan of flying throught the air at 500 mph in a presurized metal tube.

Alcohol makes the experience MUCH more enjoyable for me and takes the edge off my nerves. I can contain myself and make sure I have only what I can handle but sadly some cannot.

However out of thousands of travellers in the sky every day is there really a large problem of intoxicated passengers? I would think not but it would be nice to see if anyone has any data on it.

I vote yes to alcohol on planes.



Do not taunt. Do not shake. Do not pander. Add coffee. Subject should be slightly human within an hour.
User currently offlineYflyer From United States of America, joined Feb 2007, 1022 posts, RR: 1
Reply 2, posted (4 years 12 months 2 days 13 hours ago) and read 3846 times:

I'm not in favor of completely banning alcohol from flights, but I would be ok with limiting the number of drinks per person, perhaps variable depending on the length of the flight. The only problem is I'm not sure how you could enforce that.

User currently offlineTK787 From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 4427 posts, RR: 12
Reply 3, posted (4 years 12 months 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 3806 times:



Quoting Force13 (Reply 1):
takes the edge off

Exactly.
You might ask "What edge?", like one of our good friends says; "There is always an edge".

Quoting Yflyer (Reply 2):
The only problem is I'm not sure how you could enforce that.


On a recent Rock Festival I was given a wrist band with 7 perforated coupons on it, numbered 1-7. Every time you get a drink they take one away. 7 drinks a bit much on a plane but 3-4 should be fine depending on the length of the flight.
It could be a pre purchased punch card maybe, or a swipe card with a limit on it.


User currently offlineYYZRWY23 From Canada, joined Aug 2009, 561 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (4 years 12 months 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 3799 times:



Quoting Force13 (Reply 1):
I can contain myself and make sure I have only what I can handle

And I know that this is a large portion of the flying public (of those who drink alcohol on aircraft) but my concern is with the few that cause a problem.

Quoting Force13 (Reply 1):
s there really a large problem of intoxicated passengers? I would think not but it would be nice to see if anyone has any data on it

I don't think I would classify it as a large problem but a problem that, when it does occur, creates a big problem. I did a quick Google search but couldn't find any data pertaining to passenger incidents.

Quoting Yflyer (Reply 2):
but I would be ok with limiting the number of drinks per person, perhaps variable depending on the length of the flight.



Quoting TK787 (Reply 3):
I was given a wrist band with 7 perforated coupons on it, numbered 1-7. Every time you get a drink they take one away. 7 drinks a bit much on a plane but 3-4 should be fine depending on the length of the flight.

Playing devil's advocate, how do you know each passenger's tolerance ot he point that they become out of control? For example, on a 5.5 hour leg on YYZ-YVR I may be able to consume double the alcohol you could without becoming extremely intoxicated to the point that I am a threat to my fellow passengers and tot he crew and aircraft. So limiting the passengers to say 4 drinks on a flight could result in me getting a very little buzz to get rid of "the edge" and causing the other passenger to become very intoxicated. I think the system is good, but won't be incredibly effective.

YYZRWY23



If you don't stand behind our troops, feel free to stand in front of them.
User currently offlinePlaneguy727 From United States of America, joined Mar 2007, 1247 posts, RR: 1
Reply 5, posted (4 years 12 months 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 3798 times:

I suggest that removal of alcohol might improve the flying experience and reduce jet lag. Alcohol consumption without proper counter-balance hydration (water) results in dehydration - and with lower humidity on planes contributes to jet lag. This is a well known situation (to the airlines and us health folk at least). Additionally, not having the deal with the person that can't control, or simply chooses not to limit consumption (even if not to the point of diversion).

If you look at the healthy flying tips in most airline magazines and websites it suggests limiting or not consuming alcohol, keeping up water intake, etc.

For the nervous flyers out there, medications exist that are quite successful in helping to manage anxiety, etc without the alcohol-related side effects or potential adverse consequences.

I do believe that it won't be going away - we're way too attached to our booze. It's a decent profit item for airlines that sell it (in Y), and an expectation of those fortunate enough to travel C/J or F.



I want to live in an old and converted 727...
User currently offlineTK787 From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 4427 posts, RR: 12
Reply 6, posted (4 years 12 months 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 3781 times:



Quoting YYZRWY23 (Reply 4):
how do you know each passenger's tolerance ot he point that they become out of control?

That is the first rule of serving drinks; "Reading the guest". The FA has to decide a lot of things very shortly;
-Is the person old enough?
-What is their mood? Celebrating, mourning?
-How did the person order the drink? Looking for any sings of trouble; like "Make it a double"
-How many drinks did they have before coming on board?
-How many drinks this person can handle; looking at sex, age, weight, ethnicity?
-How many drinks should be served to this person in an hour?
-Are they having food with the drinks?

By the way you are totally correct. At the same rock show my wife got 7 coupons also. I didn't know where they came with that number. It was a half day show but to have 7 drinks even in a full day is too much for me, my wife will be in a coma if she had 7 drinks.
So no easy answers to limiting the number of drinks. 3 drinks should be the limit to cross the pond but what happens if a 22 year old 90 lbs girl decides to have all 3 in the first hour of the flight?


User currently onlineL410Turbolet From Czech Republic, joined May 2004, 5697 posts, RR: 18
Reply 7, posted (4 years 12 months 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 3769 times:

Quoting YYZRWY23 (Thread starter):
what do you think?

Not enough restrictions, bans and regulations annoying the cr*p out of our lives already?
I usually avoid alcohol while flying longhaul because my jetlags are bad enough even without drinking, however I would still love to be left with the option if I feel like having a bottle of a wine with my meal or simply enjoy a cold one.

[Edited 2009-09-05 08:28:06]

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