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BA Won't Allow Me To Pay For An Upgrade  
User currently offlinemckvakk From Norway, joined Mar 2010, 81 posts, RR: 0
Posted (4 years 4 months 1 week 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 6475 times:

I got a very good deal on a return trip Oslo - New York with BA this summer. But after giving it some thought i decided i wanted some extra comfort on the return leg JFK-LHR since it's a night flight. But Apparently since i paid so little for the ticket i'm not allowed to upgrade.

I'm sure i'll survive in economy too, but find it a little weird that BA won't allow me to give them more money..

Is there any reason airlines do this? I have never encountered it before. One would think they would like as much as possible from every passenger..

[Edited 2010-05-10 04:41:49]

8 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlinePacNWJet From United States of America, joined Sep 2000, 980 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (4 years 4 months 1 week 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 6417 times:

Quoting mckvakk (Thread starter):
I'm sure i'll survive in economy too, but find it a little weird that BA won't allow me to give them more money..

Try giving them a call on the phone, talk to someone in person, and be clear and persistent that you want to pay for a higher class of service, not an "upgrade." BA likely will have to re-issue the ticket (for which there likely will be a fee) instead of simply changing your class of service on the flight.

I had a similar experience with Delta a few years ago. My wife's parents paid for our flight to accompany them on a vacation to Mexico. My wife and I wanted to fly in First Class so I called Delta and said I wanted to pay to change from Coach to First. The customer service representative said that our fare "did not allow for an upgrade." I told her I didn't want to upgrade with miles but would pay the difference. She persisted: "That fare is not upgradable." I had to be very form with her by telling her I wanted to pay with "cash money; U.S. dollars; real money; not miles; pay with money." She finally got the drift and said she would have to re-issue the ticket which would incur a fee to which I readily agreed.

So the moral of the story is to be firm that you don't want to "upgrade." You want to pay money to change your class of service.


User currently offlineReifel From Germany, joined Feb 2005, 1360 posts, RR: 1
Reply 2, posted (4 years 4 months 1 week 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 6383 times:

You most likely booked a very cheap fare that does not allow any changes. This means you cannot change your ticket, not another date, not to another service class, nothing. Even if you are willing to pay a million, if they stuck on the fare rules it's not possible.

Of course they airline would have at least be able to offer you something out of "goodwill", since you were willing to pay quite a lot. Quite silly to loose business that way.

At least offering to buy a new ticket and refund the taxes on the existing one. That would have been your only option if they stucked with the fare rules.


User currently offlineburnsie28 From United States of America, joined Aug 2004, 7545 posts, RR: 8
Reply 3, posted (4 years 4 months 1 week 2 days 16 hours ago) and read 6377 times:

Quoting PacNWJet (Reply 1):
Try giving them a call on the phone, talk to someone in person, and be clear and persistent that you want to pay for a higher class of service, not an "upgrade." BA likely will have to re-issue the ticket (for which there likely will be a fee) instead of simply changing your class of service on the flight.

I had a similar experience with Delta a few years ago. My wife's parents paid for our flight to accompany them on a vacation to Mexico. My wife and I wanted to fly in First Class so I called Delta and said I wanted to pay to change from Coach to First. The customer service representative said that our fare "did not allow for an upgrade." I told her I didn't want to upgrade with miles but would pay the difference. She persisted: "That fare is not upgradable." I had to be very form with her by telling her I wanted to pay with "cash money; U.S. dollars; real money; not miles; pay with money." She finally got the drift and said she would have to re-issue the ticket which would incur a fee to which I readily agreed.

So the moral of the story is to be firm that you don't want to "upgrade." You want to pay money to change your class of service.

Thats just cancelling the reservation, even paying cash money to go from one fare class to another is considered an "upgrade".



"Some People Just Know How To Fly"- Best slogan ever, RIP NW 1926-2009
User currently offlinePacNWJet From United States of America, joined Sep 2000, 980 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (4 years 4 months 1 week 2 days 15 hours ago) and read 6335 times:

Quoting burnsie28 (Reply 3):
Thats just cancelling the reservation, even paying cash money to go from one fare class to another is considered an "upgrade".

So in other words, it can be done if a passenger is willing to pay whatever fee is necessary to cancel the reservation and re-issue the ticket. When I did this on Delta, even with the rock-bottom fare initially involved, I was able to get a new ticket in the higher class and not lose the money on the original ticket. I understand that in some cases a ticket is "non-refundable" which means one loses one's money if the ticket is canceled, but in the case of Delta I was able to cancel the original ticket and apply the proceeds (plus a fee) to the new ticket. What tripped up the Delta customer service rep was her own fixation with the word "upgrade" and the fact that the ticket was "not upgradable." She couldn't get her mind to get off the idea that I presumably wanted to use miles to "upgrade." I persisted and convinced her to re-issue the ticket at the higher fare with me paying the difference.


User currently offlineReifel From Germany, joined Feb 2005, 1360 posts, RR: 1
Reply 5, posted (4 years 4 months 1 week 2 days 15 hours ago) and read 6318 times:

Quoting PacNWJet (Reply 4):
So in other words, it can be done if a passenger is willing to pay whatever fee is necessary to cancel the reservation and re-issue the ticket. When I did this on Delta, even with the rock-bottom fare initially involved, I was able to get a new ticket in the higher class and not lose the money on the original ticket. I understand that in some cases a ticket is "non-refundable" which means one loses one's money if the ticket is canceled, but in the case of Delta I was able to cancel the original ticket and apply the proceeds (plus a fee) to the new ticket. What tripped up the Delta customer service rep was her own fixation with the word "upgrade" and the fact that the ticket was "not upgradable." She couldn't get her mind to get off the idea that I presumably wanted to use miles to "upgrade." I persisted and convinced her to re-issue the ticket at the higher fare with me paying the difference.

Interesting, but I guess this is different. US Airlines have a lot of nonrefundable fares that allow cancellation and issue a travel credit voucher (usually deducting a administration fee for the refund transaction, which is NOT a cancellation fee) for the nonrefundable part of the ticket. This is written in the fare rules. So basically in your case they seem to have sticked to the fare rules as well. You may buy a new ticket within 2 minutes or 6 months and apply the travel voucher, what they did. In the end it's basically the same result as upgrading your fare, but doing it that way they could at least respect the fare rules.

However this process is almost nonexistent in Europe. With European airlines, when you cancel a nonrefundable ticket, you loose everything and have to buy a new ticket in business class. The nonrefundable part will NOT be credited towards the new ticket. It's very very very uncommun in Europe to do that. Travel vouchers may be issued in case the flight is cancelled and the client accepts to get a travel voucher instead of a full refund (but in 99% of the cases a full refund is made) or in case of goodwill in case a visa isn't granted, hospitalization takes place or if there is a death case.


User currently offlinelhr380 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (4 years 4 months 1 week 2 days 15 hours ago) and read 6309 times:

There are certain economy tickets that allow NO changes to the reservation what so ever, be they date, time or Upgrades. It must be one of these fares. I actually saw one yesterday on a Euro route.

Quoting Reifel (Reply 2):
Of course they airline would have at least be able to offer you something out of "goodwill", since you were willing to pay quite a lot. Quite silly to loose business that way.

No, not at all. The ticket purchased and the rules attached were agreed to by the passenger when brought.

Quoting Reifel (Reply 2):
At least offering to buy a new ticket and refund the taxes on the existing one. That would have been your only option if they stucked with the fare rules.

That depends if its a BA booking or a travel agent booking. If its made by the travel agent, any refunds must be handled by them.


User currently offlinemckvakk From Norway, joined Mar 2010, 81 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (4 years 4 months 1 week 2 days 13 hours ago) and read 6284 times:

Quoting lhr380 (Reply 6):
No, not at all. The ticket purchased and the rules attached were agreed to by the passenger when brought.

That's a part of my point. I agreed on these rules when i bought them. But it just seems so weird that i'm not allowed to give the airline more money. Why set such a rule?


User currently offlinelhr380 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (4 years 4 months 1 week 2 days 11 hours ago) and read 6250 times:

Quoting mckvakk (Reply 7):
That's a part of my point. I agreed on these rules when i bought them. But it just seems so weird that i'm not allowed to give the airline more money. Why set such a rule?

Why set any rules?

There**** MAY**** be an option to upgrade to World Traveller Plus for a set fee on the night flight, look out for the offer on BA.com when checking in online,or it may be offered at JFK.


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