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ExpressJet Interview Coming Up 11/2 (Need Advice)  
User currently offlinesf3sce From United States of America, joined Apr 2008, 115 posts, RR: 0
Posted (3 years 9 months 3 weeks 6 days 18 hours ago) and read 5303 times:

Good Evening Friends!

I am in need of some advice. I am new to the world of interviewing and I that is why I am coming to you guys. I have be selected to be interviewed in Houston on Tuesday, November 2nd for ExpressJet. I am beyond ecstatic because this has always been a dream of mine.

I was wondering if you all could let me know a little about the company, the plans for the ORD base as that is where I would be allocated if I received the position, benefits, and Flight Pay per hour. Thanks guys! Very much appreciated!


jet. its a must.
10 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineKevinL1011 From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 2964 posts, RR: 48
Reply 1, posted (3 years 9 months 3 weeks 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 5296 times:

Forget about trying to impress them with any inside knowledge of their operation or the airline industry in general (unless asked). They know you have a certain level of knowledge or you wouldn't be there. They want to see how well you know yourself and the manner in which you present your attributes. After all, if hired, you will be representing their corporate image and be their face to the world. How you present yourself is indicative of how you will represent them. If you're confident in yourself and believe that you'll be an asset to their operation, you can't go wrong. It's all about you, not them. Be yourself, relax and know that you don't need this job to be successful. If it doesn't work out, then it wasn't the right place to be anyway.

I once worked in the corporate world for a global manufacturer and my boss once told me "You have two ears and one mouth. Do twice the listening and half the talking". This is also good advice for an interview.

The fact that you posted this thread seeking advice indicates that your a resourceful person. This is definitely one of your best attributes.
Good luck Jake!



474218, Carl, You will be missed.
User currently offlineSurfandSnow From United States of America, joined Jan 2009, 2862 posts, RR: 30
Reply 2, posted (3 years 9 months 3 weeks 6 days 14 hours ago) and read 5288 times:

Quoting sf3sce (Thread starter):
I am beyond ecstatic because this has always been a dream of mine.

Don't get too giddy, but absolutely convey your enthusiasm for the position and company. The last thing they want is someone to waltz in with a chip on their shoulder who acts like this would just be a stepping stone they wouldn't take seriously. Assuming they meet the expected criteria, the person who gets the job is usually the one who wants it the most.

Since ExpressJet is a company scrutinized for customer service make sure to show the interviewer(s) your people skills. When you walk in, smile and give them a firm handshake. Before the interview starts don't be afraid to ask them how their day is going, what life in Houston is like, anything that you might ask a passenger who boards your plane. If you have worked in a restaurant or retail before point that out, as those jobs taught you how to multitask and deal with all kinds of customers under (sometimes) stressful conditions.

Be ready for behavioral based questions. Most companies want to know how you think and will put you on the spot to answer a number of challenging "what if" scenarios. I don't know if you trying to be a pilot or FA but for a pilot they might ask "You have a suspicious passenger onboard that is not obeying the flight attendant. How do you defuse the situation in a calm, effective manner?" For a FA they might ask "you notice that a clearly intoxicated passenger is asking for an alcoholic beverage. Since you are tired from a long day and it is a late night flight you hope one more drink will put him to sleep. Do you serve him in a discreet manner, or risk a loud confrontation by cutting him off?" There may be no clear "right" answer as is evident in the pilot question, but be sure to go into as much detail as possible. Perhaps relate the situation to a prior work or life experience. In the FA case you are expected to cut the passenger off, but they want to know how you would do it without disturbing other sleeping passengers and irritating the drunken passenger. Could be as simple as offering him some ice water and snack packs with a smile.

When they are done asking you questions, it is likely they will say, "do you have any questions for me?" This is the one step of interviews where most people fail. They are quick to say "No" and get out of there as quickly as possible. Ask them questions!!! Avoid inappropriate or basic questions "how many planes are in the fleet?" "how much will I be paid?" "what kind of accommodations do we stay in on layovers", etc. Ask intelligent questions that show you have done your homework, like "The United/Continental merger poses unique challenges for ExpressJet, as the new airline seeks to consolidate regional operations and focus contracted growth on large regional jets that offer first class. How does ExpressJet plan to meet their current and future needs with a large fleet of 50 seat RJs?"

Hope this all helps. Feel free to send me a PM with any further questions you may have, and definitely let us know how the interview goes!



Flying in the middle seat of coach is much better than not flying at all!
User currently offlineRoseFlyer From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 9591 posts, RR: 52
Reply 3, posted (3 years 9 months 3 weeks 6 days 1 hour ago) and read 5249 times:

Quoting sf3sce (Thread starter):

I was wondering if you all could let me know a little about the company, the plans for the ORD base as that is where I would be allocated if I received the position, benefits, and Flight Pay per hour. Thanks guys! Very much appreciated!

One thing I would focus on reading about is the recent acquisition of Expressjet by Skywest. They are merging them with ASA and I am sure there are a lot of things related to that. You should ask about that as it also might affect your job security.

Quoting KevinL1011 (Reply 1):
Forget about trying to impress them with any inside knowledge of their operation or the airline industry in general (unless asked). They know you have a certain level of knowledge or you wouldn't be there

While it is difficult to impress with knowledge, it is very possible to be unimpressive if you are ignorant. You don't have to memorize the fleet, know ever destination and be up to date on the yearly earnings report, but if you don't know where the hubs are, what airlines Expressjet works for and what being an FA requires, you could easily embarrass yourself and look unprepared.



If you have never designed an airplane part before, let the real designers do the work!
User currently offlineKevinL1011 From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 2964 posts, RR: 48
Reply 4, posted (3 years 9 months 3 weeks 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 5230 times:

Quoting RoseFlyer (Reply 3):
but if you don't know where the hubs are, what airlines Expressjet works for and what being an FA requires, you could easily embarrass yourself and look unprepared.

That kind of stuff is part of employee orientation and training. It's nice to know if they ask but certainly not a deal breaker.

Quoting RoseFlyer (Reply 3):
You should ask about that as it also might affect your job security.

That would be kind of cocky. That's a question only a current employee should ask. If job security is a concern, then maybe he should look elsewhere. There is no job security in the airline business anyway.

Quoting SurfandSnow (Reply 2):
Be ready for behavioral based questions. Most companies want to know how you think and will put you on the spot to answer a number of challenging "what if" scenarios.

That's a good tip however the question my not be industry related. Those types of probing questions will usually be in an everyday life context.

Quoting SurfandSnow (Reply 2):
Ask intelligent questions that show you have done your homework, like "The United/Continental merger poses unique challenges for ExpressJet, as the new airline seeks to consolidate regional operations and focus contracted growth on large regional jets that offer first class. How does ExpressJet plan to meet their current and future needs with a large fleet of 50 seat RJs?"

Good suggestion. Showing an interest in their corporate strategy and philosophy will indicate an understanding of the big picture.

Keep us posted Jake!



474218, Carl, You will be missed.
User currently offlinecofannyc From United States of America, joined Jan 2007, 214 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (3 years 9 months 3 weeks 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 5209 times:

Quoting KevinL1011 (Reply 4):
That kind of stuff is part of employee orientation and training. It's nice to know if they ask but certainly not a deal breaker.

It's absolutely a deal breaker. It takes maybe 13 seconds of research and indicates that you care in the least about the company and the industry. What you're advocating is like someone applying to Geico and telling them it's ok to not know they are into car insurance.

Quoting KevinL1011 (Reply 4):
That would be kind of cocky. That's a question only a current employee should ask. If job security is a concern, then maybe he should look elsewhere. There is no job security in the airline business anyway.

Totally ridiculous again. Joining a company in a state of flux is a confusing situation. Asking questions like this shows that you care about being with the company and making a difference down the road. There is job security in the airline business; saying there isn't is a cop out for being unprepared for an interview.


User currently offlineKevinL1011 From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 2964 posts, RR: 48
Reply 6, posted (3 years 9 months 3 weeks 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 5204 times:

Quoting cofannyc (Reply 5):
It takes maybe 13 seconds of research and indicates that you care in the least about the company and the industry. What you're advocating is like someone applying to Geico and telling them it's ok to not know they are into car insurance.

13 seconds huh. Sounds like you have a good grasp on reality. Your exaggerated analogy about applying to Geico has no relevance to this situation or anything that you claim I've "advocated". Jake isn't applying, he's been selected for an interview based on his resume, education and experience. I take it you've never been on the interviewer side of the desk.

Quoting cofannyc (Reply 5):
Totally ridiculous again. Joining a company in a state of flux is a confusing situation. Asking questions like this shows that you care about being with the company and making a difference down the road. There is job security in the airline business; saying there isn't is a cop out for being unprepared for an interview.

Joining a company in a state of flux is a risky situation as well. Questioning job security only indicates one thing, insecurity. It shows self interest, not interest in the company. As far as job security in the airline industry, I guess you don't know what happens when airlines merge, as if that never happens.



474218, Carl, You will be missed.
User currently offlineRoseFlyer From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 9591 posts, RR: 52
Reply 7, posted (3 years 9 months 3 weeks 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 5182 times:

Quoting KevinL1011 (Reply 6):

Joining a company in a state of flux is a risky situation as well. Questioning job security only indicates one thing, insecurity. It shows self interest, not interest in the company. As far as job security in the airline industry, I guess you don't know what happens when airlines merge, as if that never happens.

I totally disagree that it shows insecurity. I do not think that someone should be willing to sacrifice anything that the company wants just because they are in a state of flux.

If someone has a family and has to move to a different city for a job, and then because a merger gets forced to move again after 6 months, they put their whole life through a lot of strain. Asking ahead of time what the probability of significant changes to the job are worth asking before you take a job as you do not want to take a job and then quit after 6 months. It is absolutely acceptable to find out more about what the job entails so that the prospective employee can make a good decision when they weigh the job, benefits, location, salary, work hours, etc. Most airlines want people as FA's who are willing to work in any city and relocate at any time. In reality that is something that is hard to find since people do not want to be vagrants. Both company expectations and employee expectations should be in line. I think it is appropriate to ask what base they are looking at hiring for and what the future of that base and the airline entail.

There is a line between asking for more information in an interview and asking for concessions or making demands in an interview. No company wants to hire an employee and then through company changes, require them to make changes in their life that the employee is not willing to do. I have been through the struggles of working for an airline and having my job switch between cities in different parts of the country. It is a major strain. Being up front with employees and telling them what is happening fosters a better working environment.

Quoting KevinL1011 (Reply 6):
Jake isn't applying, he's been selected for an interview based on his resume, education and experience. I take it you've never been on the interviewer side of the desk.

I have been on both sides of the table at an airline and outside an airline (although never an FA type job) and many things can make or break an interview. A resume might show great customer service skills, but if someone comes in clueless that they will be working multiple day trips or that they could be on reserve, it shows that they are not serious about the job. It is a bit irrelevant, but I have interviewed at a small business before and the first thing they asked me was "what do you know about this company and how do you fit in?".

Quoting KevinL1011 (Reply 4):
Quoting RoseFlyer (Reply 3):
but if you don't know where the hubs are, what airlines Expressjet works for and what being an FA requires, you could easily embarrass yourself and look unprepared.

That kind of stuff is part of employee orientation and training. It's nice to know if they ask but certainly not a deal breaker.

Not necessarily a deal breaker, but in an interview you are trying to prove yourself.

Quoting KevinL1011 (Reply 4):

That would be kind of cocky. That's a question only a current employee should ask. If job security is a concern, then maybe he should look elsewhere. There is no job security in the airline business anyway.

I am a firm believer that interviews go both ways. They want to figure out if they want to hire you and you want to figure out if they are the right employer.

I also disagree that there is no job security in the airline business. When I was working at an airline, only 4 of the 22 people in the department had less than 10 years at the airline. It depends where you are.



If you have never designed an airplane part before, let the real designers do the work!
User currently offlineKevinL1011 From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 2964 posts, RR: 48
Reply 8, posted (3 years 9 months 3 weeks 4 days 21 hours ago) and read 5148 times:

Quoting RoseFlyer (Reply 7):
Asking ahead of time what the probability of significant changes to the job are worth asking before you take a job as you do not want to take a job and then quit after 6 months. It is absolutely acceptable to find out more about what the job entails so that the prospective employee can make a good decision when they weigh the job, benefits, location, salary, work hours, etc.

Absolutely Rose Flyer. As an employer (past 21 years) I've hired and fired many. Employers must be very careful answering questions regarding future employee retention or work scheduling during an interview. It can very easily come back to bite you. Telling a prospective employee that the company has no plans to reduce their workforce could be later interpreted as a false promise should it ever happen. I've had to cut employees work hours when things got slow and had responses like "You said I'd always be full time" because that was the condition of their initial hiring.

In todays economic climate, employers have far more applicants than available positions. The best qualified candidate may get passed for another who shows more flexibility and willingness to work under variable conditions. I'd be very careful about asking questions regarding future employment conditions and not cast any shadows of doubt in the company. I think the key is how you phrase the question. After reading your post, I now believe that it is possible to pose such a question and not appear self serving.

Quoting RoseFlyer (Reply 7):
I also disagree that there is no job security in the airline business.

Perhaps it was a bit extreme to say "no security" because there is some. Though, it is true that the airline industry has one of the highest rates for take-overs, mergers and bankruptcies next to retail food and banking. It used to be that Policemen, Firemen and Teachers had job security. Not any more with several states, cities and municipalities that are millions (in Calif. billions) over their budgets. Job security is now at an all time low in every industry and the airlines have historically shown a poor track record.
However, I have now softened my position regarding this due to your eloquent and most persuasive post Rose Flyer. Well done and thanks for providing me with a better perspective.



474218, Carl, You will be missed.
User currently offlineKevinL1011 From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 2964 posts, RR: 48
Reply 9, posted (3 years 9 months 3 weeks 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 5116 times:

Quoting sf3sce (Thread starter):
I was wondering if you all could let me know a little about the company, the plans for the ORD base as that is where I would be allocated if I received the position, benefits, and Flight Pay per hour. Thanks guys! Very much appreciated!

You mean we can't tell you how to handle the interview? Dang.

I flew Express Jet twice before they pulled out of KONT. I booked my daughter 3 times to MCI for $79.00 each way from ONT. They were always on time (if not early) and the flight crew was very personable. She struck a conversation with a veteran ex EAL FA gentleman and mentioned that her dad loves TriStars. He said "Oh, at Eastern we called them the Tri-Tanic"". If he'd said that to me, I would'a......   

I flew their charter service twice to IFP. One flight had only 10 PAX. That was a great flight and real bumpy in to IFP ( I love chop). Those ERJs perform well and are great regional airplanes. The ERJ-145 is one of my favorite FSX ships mainly because of the cockpit design.

http://cdn-www.airliners.net/aviation-photos/photos/9/9/2/1494299.jpg

If this beautiful shot doesn't motivate you to be part of this airline, then.... i dunno.

http://cdn-www.airliners.net/aviation-photos/photos/3/6/0/1336063.jpg

I've had their reservations link saved in my favorites for years and haven't gone there since they pulled out of ONT. I found this notice regarding the Sky West merger. Very interesting. You might want to ask them how the merger will affect future employee allocation.   

http://press.expressjet.com/phoenix....-newsArticle&ID=1483897&highlight=



474218, Carl, You will be missed.
User currently offlinesf3sce From United States of America, joined Apr 2008, 115 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (3 years 9 months 3 weeks 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 5042 times:

Good evening guys!

Thank you so very much for your input to my ordeal. Sadly I was unable to attend the interview due to schoolwork. Had a Math Exam today and I put schoolwork before play as I still am in college. Things happen for a reasons so I am sticking to my motto. I am happy to say at least my resume was one of the many that stuck out. Going to keep trucking! Thanks again everyone, I appreciate your help so, so very much.

Have a great rest of your week and be safe!

Jake!



jet. its a must.
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