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When Is It 'too Sick To Fly'  
User currently offlineltbewr From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 13113 posts, RR: 12
Posted (3 years 7 months 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 8126 times:

What are the guidelines for commercial airlines to deny boarding to a passenger because they are too sick to fly? I know that there are airline and national rules as to pregnant women for example, but are there rules airline by airline or are their national rules or do they just go by a doctor's recommendation as to medical conditions if a person is ok to fly?

I ask this as the College senior granddaughter of my mom's best friend has become ill, with substantial bleeding, while on a study semester in I believe is Bulgaria. This woman had been very ill as a child, including a bout of cancer at age 4, the parents want to bring her back to the USA (here in New Jersey) where doctors knowledgeable as to her condition and are tying to get her back on a commercial flight and doctors where she is are apparently trying to determine if it is safe for her to fly. I doubt she or the parents have medevac flight insurance. I know that private medevac flights are very expensive, the husband another friend of my mom's, became too ill in Florida to travel on a commercial flight and had to take a medevac flight back at a cost of something like $15,000. I would assume a medevac flight from Europe would be several times that amount.

5 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineflyingalex From Germany, joined Jul 2010, 1016 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (3 years 7 months 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 8101 times:

I would not solicit medical advice on a forum such as this.

I will say only two things:

1. There are some conditions which can be exacerbated by flying (due to pressure changes).

2. Call the U.S. Embassy in Bulgaria, they will have lists of recommended doctors who speak English. Have your mom's friend's granddaughter visit one of these doctors, and only if he/she clears her to fly should you consider flying her out with anything less than medevac.



Public service announcement: "It's" = "it is". To indicate posession, write "its." Looks wrong, but it's correct grammar
User currently offlinelaxboeingman From United States of America, joined Mar 2008, 553 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (3 years 7 months 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 7830 times:

There was a person who got kicked off the flight just before we were going to board because she had just vomited, so I believe that that would be one instance that a person is too sick to fly.

Quoting flyingalex (Reply 1):
. Call the U.S. Embassy in Bulgaria, they will have lists of recommended doctors who speak English. Have your mom's friend's granddaughter visit one of these doctors, and only if he/she clears her to fly should you consider flying her out with anything less than medevac.

I would do that, to be sure, and it is a good idea.

laxboeingman



The real American classics: LAX and Boeing.
User currently offlineAesma From France, joined Nov 2009, 6651 posts, RR: 11
Reply 3, posted (3 years 6 months 4 weeks 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 7134 times:

Any update on the story ? Why did she not have travel insurance ? Because of her medical history maybe ?


New Technology is the name we give to stuff that doesn't work yet. Douglas Adams
User currently offlinesignol From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2007, 3005 posts, RR: 8
Reply 4, posted (3 years 6 months 4 weeks 9 hours ago) and read 6823 times:

Could someone in a local hospital call the patient's own medical staff at home to get a full picture, before deciding whether or not she can fly on her regular flight?
One would assume that regular travel insurance would include medevac flights, and anyone with more severe medical issues (my wife included) would be wise to pay up the increased premium (my wife's travel insurance costs about 6x that of mine, for example).

signol



Flights booked: none :(
User currently offlineDl767captain From United States of America, joined Mar 2007, 2539 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (3 years 6 months 4 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 6816 times:

I'm not sure what their guidelines are butthe last time I was flying home with a cold/flu descending the sinus pressure in my head was like a sudden sharp knife by my eye. I'm pretty sure the lady next to me thought I was having a stroke or something. All I know is if you can avoid flying sick then do it. Otherwise talk to a doctor to make sure it won't get worse by flying.

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