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Spanish Translation  
User currently offlinee38 From United States of America, joined May 2008, 343 posts, RR: 0
Posted (3 years 6 months 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 2626 times:

For our Spanish-speaking A.Netters:

I have been studying Spanish for a few years but have not found a good translation for "Flight Attendant." Here is what I have been told (the source of the information is in parenthesis):

1. Azafata (from a Spanish textbook used in high school)
2. Auxiliar (from an Iberia flight attendant)
3. Sobrecargo (from a Mexicana flight attendant)
3. Asistente de Vuelo (from the back of a Delta Air Lines safety card).

Which is correct and in which part of the Spanish-speaking world is it used (Spain, South America, Mexico/Central America)? Are there any other translations?

Also, I have heard two terms for pilot--piloto and ejecutivo. Are both correct?

Thank you. Muchas Gracias para las informaciones y de ayudarme.

e38

10 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineCoal From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 2051 posts, RR: 9
Reply 1, posted (3 years 6 months 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 2612 times:

I remember from my days living and traveling to Colombia they were just called Azafata (stewardess) and Asistente de Vuelo (mostly for the male F/As, which weren't comon back then).

I just called them "Ingeniero/a de comfort de vuelo"    After all, isn't that what they will end up being called in English?

Cheers
Coal



Nxt Flts: VA SYD-CBR-SYD | QF SYD-DFW | AA DFW-TLH-MIA-DFW | QF DFW-SYD
User currently offlineAeroflot001 From Argentina, joined Oct 2009, 403 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (3 years 6 months 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 2591 times:

In Argentina i have heard the usage of Azafata and Auxiliar equally so both are correct. I hadnever heard the expression Sobrecargo beofer, interesting.

User currently offlinechepos From Puerto Rico, joined Dec 2000, 6220 posts, RR: 11
Reply 3, posted (3 years 6 months 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 2585 times:

I have always refered to f/a's as asistente de vuelo or azafatas (females only). Never ever have I refered toa f/a as an auxiliar.

Regards,

Chepos



Fly the Flag!!!!
User currently offlineop3000 From United States of America, joined Jun 2009, 1767 posts, RR: 2
Reply 4, posted (3 years 6 months 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 2563 times:

Azafata is still the most widely used term by the public for female flight attendants (the equivalent to stewardess - though more politically correct in Spanish). Otherwise it's "asistente de vuelo" or "auxiliar de vuelo".

And Mexicans do use the term "sobrecargo", but also use and understand the other two. Perhaps a Mexican member can expand on this.

IIRC from my Iberia flights in crews in Spain use the term "auxiliar de vuelo" more (though auxiliar and asistente are synonyms and easily interchangeable).


User currently onlineAR385 From Mexico, joined Nov 2003, 6217 posts, RR: 30
Reply 5, posted (3 years 6 months 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 2553 times:
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The most common terms used here in Mexico are "Azafata" and "sobrecargo". "Asistente de vuelo" I have nerver heard and sounds too baroque, heavy if you get my drift, same with "Auxiliar de vuelo", which gives the connotation of a nurse.

In Spain "Azafata" is also used although less and less as it can also mean your average pretty young lady standing by displays in convention centers.

I have heard "Auxiliar de vuelo" in Argentina but older people also still use "Azafata". But if you go by AR I would call them "Señoritas or auxiliares incompetentes", but I don´t know if that would catch.

"Ejecutivo de vuelo" I have never heard anywhere.


User currently offlineop3000 From United States of America, joined Jun 2009, 1767 posts, RR: 2
Reply 6, posted (3 years 6 months 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 2528 times:

Quoting AR385 (Reply 5):
In Spain "Azafata" is also used although less and less as it can also mean your average pretty young lady standing by displays in convention centers.

LOL - this I did not know. I guess I have to hang out more at the Feria de Madrid 


User currently offlinee38 From United States of America, joined May 2008, 343 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (3 years 6 months 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 2485 times:

Muchas gracias a todos.
Thank you very much for the information.

I found it interesting that "azafata" is still used quite a bit. I was told once by a Spanish professor that "Azafata" is really very formal, older Spanish and not used frequently--much like "stewardess" in English, but as was mentioned, azafata is not considered a "negative" or "politically incorrect" term in Spanish.

As an aside, I have never found the word "Stewardess" to be negative or derogatory. To me, the term "Stewardess" still implies a very dignified, respectable, professional career.

Thank you for the replies. Spanish is certainly a beautiful language--I'm working hard to learn it. Estudio mucho.

e38


User currently offlinemaiYYZ From Canada, joined Jul 2001, 35 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (3 years 6 months 2 days ago) and read 2471 times:

Just on a side note, in Brazilian Portuguese we say aeromoça or comissária de bordo, but in Portugal they call it hospedeira... And we speak the same language. That just to say that even in the same language, you could have different names.


CU IL62M, CP 763, QN A310, QN B757, AC 763, CU A320, SP A310, AC A340, AC B773, AA B772, AA B738, AA CRJ600
User currently offlineCheco77 From Peru, joined Oct 2004, 1345 posts, RR: 8
Reply 9, posted (3 years 6 months 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 2458 times:

I like to use "tripulacion de cabina"  

Adam



Czech Boeing lover living in Lima
User currently offlineSKY1 From Spain, joined Apr 2006, 879 posts, RR: 4
Reply 10, posted (3 years 6 months 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 2444 times:

Nowadays the right, official term in Spain is T.C.P (tripulante cabina de pasajeros) but the most common that everybody understand and recognize is "Azafata" (for women) "Azafato" (for men, but not very well-mannered as it sounds a bit 'provincial' or childish) and Auxiliar de Vuelo (for both, women and men)

There are countries such as Venezuela or Cuba that call them "aeromozos/zas" but not sure if it's very colloquial

Quoting op3000 (Reply 4):

And Mexicans do use the term "sobrecargo", but also use and understand the other two. Perhaps a Mexican member can expand on this.

Sobrecargo in the Spanish carriers is used for the one who managed the crew, he's/she's the main responsible kinda like Air France's "Chef de Cabine Principal"

Quoting AR385 (Reply 5):
In Spain "Azafata" is also used although less and less as it can also mean your average pretty young lady standing by displays in convention centers.

In Spain "azafata" can be used for both.

Quoting Checo77 (Reply 9):
I like to use "tripulacion de cabina"

It's used for the entire pax crew, for the all 'team'



Time flies! Enjoy life!
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