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Dropping Final Leg Of Flight  
User currently offlinesomething From United Kingdom, joined May 2011, 1633 posts, RR: 21
Posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 5 days 19 hours ago) and read 4923 times:

Hey,

I have a question that I can't seem to find the answer to online. Which is surprising as I imagine more people have found themselves in the same position before.

I need to book a flight from NYC to HAM and back. The cheapest fare I could find was United EWR-HAM-DUS and DUS-MXP-EWR on the way back. My question is, as the thread title suggests, whether or not it'd be possible for my friend to leave the airport (and ideally collect the luggage) at HAM on the inbound leg?

Thanks in advance  


..sick of it. -K. Pilkington.
10 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlinesrbmod From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 5 days 19 hours ago) and read 4916 times:

Nope, as the luggage will be tagged for the destination point on the ticket, DUS. Plus if you don't fly the HAM-DUS leg, you'll have the return leg cancelled on you (assuming it's booked as part of the same itinerary and not a separate one).

User currently offlinereifel From Germany, joined Feb 2005, 1361 posts, RR: 1
Reply 2, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 4879 times:

Don't do that in this particular scenario as stated earlier.

The bag tag problematic aside, you will have all segments after the no show flight cancelled! This will happen for sure.
If these kind of things are done with the very last segment, then it's somehow ok if you manage to travel with hand luguage or if you manage to short tag your bags.


User currently offlinesomething From United Kingdom, joined May 2011, 1633 posts, RR: 21
Reply 3, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 4854 times:

Thanks for the expeditious replies guys. I guess two ICE tickets it is then. Quite the farce that is. Passing through Hamburg, only to come back a few hours later.


..sick of it. -K. Pilkington.
User currently offlinereifel From Germany, joined Feb 2005, 1361 posts, RR: 1
Reply 4, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 4 days 21 hours ago) and read 4762 times:

but this is normal. You need to look at origin and destination. If you want to fly EWR-HAM only the airline will usually give you higher fares, since there is no other nonstop competition. People are willing to pay more to fly nonstop on this segment.
However if you look at EWR-DUS it'a nother story. LH and AB fly nonstop, and a huge amount of other airlines offer 1 stop connections. Obviously UA therefore needs to lower price in order to be competitive.

And by the way, connecting in HAM is definitely not usual and surely nice  


User currently offlinesomething From United Kingdom, joined May 2011, 1633 posts, RR: 21
Reply 5, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 4748 times:

Quoting reifel (Reply 4):
However if you look at EWR-DUS it'a nother story. LH and AB fly nonstop, and a huge amount of other airlines offer 1 stop connections. Obviously UA therefore needs to lower price in order to be competitive.

TXL and DUS are the cheapest arrival airports from the NYC area in all of Europe. That one of them routes through Hamburg is just a coincidence, the others all go through Frankfurt, Zürich, Geneva, Milan and Stuttgart and terminate in either DUS or TXL. They're all under $500 round trip all in. All other airports (DUB, SNN, MAN, LHR, CDG, AMS, BRU, MUC, ZRH, VIE, CPH, MAD, LIS.. I searched for literally everything!) start at around $650 round trip. The cheapest flight to Hamburg from New York is a two-stop LGA-PHL-FRA-HAM on US for a bit over $700. EWR-HAM-EWR on UA is $800-something. The saving is totally worth the hassle. Would have just been nice to dispense with some of the hassle at that..



..sick of it. -K. Pilkington.
User currently offlineLJ From Netherlands, joined Nov 1999, 4435 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 4663 times:

Quoting reifel (Reply 2):

The bag tag problematic aside, you will have all segments after the no show flight cancelled! This will happen for sure.
If these kind of things are done with the very last segment, then it's somehow ok if you manage to travel with hand luguage or if you manage to short tag your bags.

It's even not a good idea if it's the final leg as some airlines will send you an invoice for the fare difference if you don't show up and they think you did it on purpose. Needless to say that doesn't matter if they cannot trace you easily (thus not if you've attached your frequent flyer number to the PNR, or bought it directly from the airline)... However, I've heard that some airlines go as far as sending a bill to the travel agent which sold the ticket (telling the agent that he must recoup the costs from the traveller).


User currently onlinealggag From United States of America, joined Apr 2010, 98 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 3 days 7 hours ago) and read 4584 times:

WN is one of the few (only?) airlines that allows this.

User currently offlinereifel From Germany, joined Feb 2005, 1361 posts, RR: 1
Reply 8, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 4563 times:

Quoting LJ (Reply 6):
It's even not a good idea if it's the final leg as some airlines will send you an invoice for the fare difference if you don't show up and they think you did it on purpose. Needless to say that doesn't matter if they cannot trace you easily (thus not if you've attached your frequent flyer number to the PNR, or bought it directly from the airline)... However, I've heard that some airlines go as far as sending a bill to the travel agent which sold the ticket (telling the agent that he must recoup the costs from the traveller).

I heard such stories too, but working as an agent for years know I can tell you that for European airlines this never happened to me. Never a guest (nor me as an agent) had to pay anything. In Europe it's illegal anyway if the airline would charge something, and I think in the US, too (some airlines, like AA, tell their agent on the agent websites "it's not wished and not ethical business relationship", which is probably right, but in the same time buy saying this they admit that they can't do anything about it.). If as an agent I would get a debit memo for these kind of things I would dispute it right away and have a strong argument with the responsible sales manager. If I book a return flight for a guests and this guest would skip his last leg, how was I suppose to know and why should I pay for that? Never ever a travel agent would accept such a debit memo, in Europe at least. Airlines know quite well they can't do anyting about it, by the way most airlines have huge so called "ADM policies" stating for what they can send a debit memo to the agent, and believe me, these policies are long and they charge basically for a lot of ticket irregularity scenarios, but skipping a leg scenario is not in these policies.

However which is true is that airlines will do whatever they can to avoid guests to do that. And this particuliary includes when they discover the plans of the passenger at the airport, if the guests wants to short tag the bags and has no good reasons for that i.e. (a good reason would be a long layover, possibly with an overnight stay).


User currently offlineblueflyer From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 4024 posts, RR: 2
Reply 9, posted (2 years 3 months 3 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 4403 times:
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Quoting LJ (Reply 6):
It's even not a good idea if it's the final leg as some airlines will send you an invoice for the fare difference if you don't show up and they think you did it on purpose.

That's a new one to me. I've heard of airlines threatening to do so but I haven't read about any real-life example yet.

What I do know has occurred is airlines auditing the frequent flier accounts of repeated (not one-off) hidden-city travelers and yanking away the miles for the entire trip. Some people did this often enough that they lost status with their frequent flier program of choice when they got caught.



I've got $h*t to do
User currently offlineStarAC17 From Canada, joined Aug 2003, 3383 posts, RR: 9
Reply 10, posted (2 years 3 months 2 weeks 6 days 2 hours ago) and read 4303 times:

Quoting something (Reply 3):
Thanks for the expeditious replies guys. I guess two ICE tickets it is then. Quite the farce that is. Passing through Hamburg, only to come back a few hours later.

If you have booked it why not try making a change to the ticket on the inbound leg and just fork over the fees to do it. Even if it costs more than the ICE ticket (I'm assuming you mean a train ticket) it would probably save a lot of hassle.

I did get out of this once but it was a circumstance that made sense when I first visited Australia I was supposed to fly YYZ-LAX-SYD and the AA flight didn't come in from YYZ because of a lot of fog and I called AA and asked what I should do because they operated the flight and they put me on an AC flight that left pretty damn quickly that I had to haul ass to YYZ to get on an SFO bound and catch QF from there to SYD. I never figured out why they couldn't put me an AC YYZ-LAX that left pretty much at the same time as the one to SFO and I couldn't catch the original QF flight LAX.

Nothing happened to my return flight and there were no issues at all, even though I was an entirely different outbound one with a different reservation number.

Quoting reifel (Reply 2):
The bag tag problematic aside, you will have all segments after the no show flight cancelled! This will happen for sure.

Even if you are technically checked in for it because the boarding pass would have been issued at EWR? I know you can't do this if you were to check in at an intermediate destination. What about late connections you miss??
I know the airline will usually own that but there must be lots of mistakes made as computers aren't perfect. .

Quoting srbmod (Reply 1):
Nope, as the luggage will be tagged for the destination point on the ticket, DUS. Plus if you don't fly the HAM-DUS leg, you'll have the return leg cancelled on you (assuming it's booked as part of the same itinerary and not a separate one).

Short checking would be irrelevant here unless Germany has another process because the pax would clear German immigration at HAM and have to claim and re-check in HAM for the flight to DUS. So the pax would have access to their bags. I often have to throw booze into my bag before re-checking lol.



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