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Weird Question About Multi-Leg Tickets.  
User currently offlineflightsimer From United States of America, joined Aug 2009, 541 posts, RR: 1
Posted (1 year 9 months 3 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 7355 times:

Ok so here is a sort of legal question I thought this community would be perfect to answer, hopefully.

Every time I have ever flown commercially, it has been on a chartered USAir 737 and was prior to 9-11, so I have never booked a normal flight myself so I can't definitively answer this question.

But I have this friend at work who asked me this question...

So in this hypothetical question, my friend wants to fly between airport A and airport D through airport B "and C" on two separate one way tickets. He would be checking in online and have all the boarding passes printed before hand. He also would only have a backpack as a carry on so no checked baggage that would need to make connections...

For the first ticket, say sector A-B departs around 4pm and lands around 6pm. Sector B-C departs around 8PM and lands around 9PM.

The second ticket would be from C-B and would depart around 5PM and land around 6PM. Sector B-D would depart around 7PM and land around 11PM.

Now let's also say for the hell of it, the airline would be United. Is there anything that allows United to legally require you to be on the B-C sector and the C-B sector? So could you effectively fly A-B-D?

Obviously they can't make you fly the B-C sector, so I'm more curious as to the second ticket. Would it be possible to not fly the C-B sector but still be able to fly the B-D sector or do they assume since you weren't on the C-B sector, you can't possibly be making the connection for the B-D sector?

I don't know, but is it even possible to be checked in for multiple tickets at the same time? If not, then I guess this would never work to begin with... I looked on the united site for answers, but I couldn't find any terms or contracts there, but I'm guessing you would receive those after only purchasing the ticket.

Thanks for any answers.


Commercial Pilot- SEL, MEL, Instrument
12 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlinesmi0006 From Australia, joined Jan 2008, 1525 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (1 year 9 months 3 weeks 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 7323 times:

Quoting flightsimer (Thread starter):
Obviously they can't make you fly the B-C sector, so I'm more curious as to the second ticket. Would it be possible to not fly the C-B sector but still be able to fly the B-D sector or do they assume since you weren't on the C-B sector, you can't possibly be making the connection for the B-D sector?

To be honest I am not 100% I understand the routing. However whilst I am not ticketing and reservations trained; for the airlines that I am contracted for, if you missed a sector and that coupon status is not changed from 'O' for open to 'F' for flown or 'E' for exchange (or whatever the alternatives are, how many potential coupon status are there?), yes the airline will assume you have not travelled have 'no showed' and thus can't possible travel back and the ticket will auto cancel and be void. It maybe possible to reissue the ticket though, but that would most likely involve a fee of some kind - if possible at all. Again I am not ticketing and Res trained but would thus be equally be intreseted in the 100% correct answer.


User currently offlinehhslax2 From Bahrain, joined Jan 2012, 122 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (1 year 9 months 3 weeks 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 7310 times:

Most (if not all) airlines will cancel the rest of your ticket if you don't show up for a flight and it isn't their fault.

User currently offlineADent From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 1359 posts, RR: 2
Reply 3, posted (1 year 9 months 3 weeks 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 7278 times:

If you buy a ticket from COS to PDX and there is a plane change in DEN - and you do not board in COS, then the DEN-PDX segment may be cancelled.

You are NOT buying a COS-DEN-PDX ticket, you are buying a COS-PDX ticket that happens to stop in DEN.

One exception is Southwest. Their connecting flights used to be separable.

Here is an example from Delta

Quote:
While not an exclusive list, the following ticketing practices are prohibited:

Back-to-back ticketing—combining multiple overlapping round-trip tickets to circumvent Saturday or other overnight stay requirements.
Throw-away ticketing—use of discounted round-trip excursion fares for one-way travel.
Point-beyond ticketing—use of a fare published for travel to a point beyond your actual intended destination or from a point before your actual intended origin.


User currently offlineAA737-823 From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 5733 posts, RR: 11
Reply 4, posted (1 year 9 months 3 weeks 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 7127 times:

You can book multi-leg tickets using the United website, BUT, if you don't show up for any one leg, they're legally allowed to terminate the remainder of your ticket, WITHOUT owing you any unused value. Bada bing, bada boom, bye bye.

User currently offlinejporterfi From United States of America, joined Feb 2012, 438 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (1 year 9 months 3 weeks 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 7111 times:

I agree with the above posts. However you could book the following and it may work. to get from A to D, you could book one ticket. A-B-C, and the other ticket B-D-E, as long as you timed it so B-E departs before B-C, so that the airline wouldn't know that you planned to not fly on the B-C leg. Or you could book the tickets on 2 separate airlines, but just make sure the leg you aren't planning on taking is after the leg that you plan on taking, so that the airline(s) don't cancel your tickets.

User currently offlineDLD9S From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 260 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (1 year 9 months 3 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 7030 times:

When your friend misses the C-B flight, the B-D flight will be cancelled, rendering your friend stuck in B.

There are also operational issues to think about, like the airline delays, cancellations and reroutes. The airline will only be focused on getting your friend to C.



717 727 737 747 757 767 777 DC9 DC10 M80 M90 M11 L10 AB6 333 340 319 320 321 ARJ CRJ EM2 EMJ SF3 146 100 BE1...
User currently offlineIMissPiedmont From United States of America, joined May 2001, 6281 posts, RR: 34
Reply 7, posted (1 year 9 months 3 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 6843 times:

But why would one do this? As I read it you fly from A to B to C then back to B and on to D. But if you had printed boarding passes in hand I bet you get on the B to D flight with no trouble.

Actually I have flown segments like this but since it was to see an airplane, or a woman, it was either during the day or two hours would not have been enough in city B. and a smart person in this position, upon deciding not to go to city B would just call and cancel B-C-B.

[Edited 2012-10-13 05:39:06]


Quit calling an airport ramp "Tarmac" and a taxiway "runway".
User currently offlinestlAV8R From United States of America, joined Nov 2010, 112 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (1 year 9 months 3 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 6813 times:

Basically, you can look at it two ways. First, if you purchase a multi-leg ticket going anywhere and you don't board one of the flight along the way, you forfeit the rest of the legs, including if there was a return portion. Same goes for if you purchase a ticket, lets say BNA-ATL-JAX and you are not in BNA but are in ATL but it was cheaper to buy the ticket starting in BNA, well when you show up at the airport in ATL to go to JAX that flight will be cancelled cause you tried to circumvent the system and again, your forfeit the rest of the legs of the ticket.

Now, you can buy multiple single-leg tickets whereas the tickets are not associated. For example, you can buy TUS-LAX, then LAX-SAN. Buying the tickets separately allows you to miss TUS-LAX and still board LAX-SAN. Only problem is if you are in TUS and the flight delays and you need to get to SAN, once you get to LAX, you are considered a no-show instead of a misconnecting passenger due to the disassociation so then all applicable fees or whatnot are solely the responsibility of the passenger. If the flight in TUS cancels and you decide you want to go TUS-PHX-SAN then again, you are out of luck because your second one-way from LAX-SAN is not associated, therefore that legs origin city cannot be changed without hefty penalties. The exception to all of this is that lets say you are travelling for business and you only were going to be in LAX for 8 hours. So, you bought the tickets separately because you were leaving and weren't sure if the meetings would run long or whatever. Well, because of the delay in TUS, you no longer need to go to LAX, some airlines, albeit all fights are on the same carrier, will rework your tikets to get you from TUS-SAN (maybe non-stop if available) and refund one of the tickets. This is purely out of courtesy ONLY and not required by any means but is done to retain loyalty.

Hope this helps...


User currently offlineViscount724 From Switzerland, joined Oct 2006, 24922 posts, RR: 22
Reply 9, posted (1 year 9 months 3 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 5201 times:

Quoting flightsimer (Thread starter):
Would it be possible to not fly the C-B sector but still be able to fly the B-D sector or do they assume since you weren't on the C-B sector, you can't possibly be making the connection for the B-D sector?

Definitely not permitted. Read UA's conditions of carriage. If you want to fly only B-D you have to pay a B-D fare. The C-B-D could well be significantly lower. Why would UA want to lose revenue by permitting you to pay a C-D fare for travel B-D which, since it's presumably nonstop, is a more valuable product than a connecting service C-B-D?


User currently offlineflygbear From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 33 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (1 year 9 months 3 weeks 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 4864 times:

Having worked ticket exchange dept. for 5 yrs at Orbitz, before they sent that work overseas. If the routing is different from the ticket the psgr shows up to use they are charged the new one-way fare between points B-D. If the "routing" on that eticket allows non-stop svc versus having to connect thru point C, then they will charge whatever the latest one-way fare is between point B-D. No questions asked.


flygbear/MSP
User currently offlineflightsimer From United States of America, joined Aug 2009, 541 posts, RR: 1
Reply 11, posted (1 year 9 months 3 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 4255 times:

Quoting Viscount724 (Reply 9):

Where are those as I was looking but couldn't find them.

Quoting flygbear (Reply 10):

Thanks for the info



Commercial Pilot- SEL, MEL, Instrument
User currently offlineViscount724 From Switzerland, joined Oct 2006, 24922 posts, RR: 22
Reply 12, posted (1 year 9 months 3 weeks 3 hours ago) and read 3812 times:

Quoting flightsimer (Reply 11):
Quoting Viscount724 (Reply 9):

Where are those as I was looking but couldn't find them.

You'll find a link to the Contract of Carriage at the bottom of the United.com home page.

Here's the resulting page.
http://www.united.com/web/en-US/content/contract.aspx

Scroll down and you'll see a link to the PDF document. Here's the actual document.
http://www.united.com/web/format/pdf/Contract_of_Carriage.pdf

See Rule 6 (J) in particular.


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