Sponsor Message:
Travel Polls & Prefs Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
We Recommend Friends From Chile To Avoid Madrid  
User currently offlineolle From Sweden, joined Feb 2007, 301 posts, RR: 0
Posted (1 year 3 months 1 week 4 days 16 hours ago) and read 3771 times:

Hello,

I not know if other people with friends fron chile or latin america do the same as us. If they arrive thru madrid, barachas often they be demanded to show money in cash and if they only bring creditcards they get trouble. Nowdays we reckomend our friends and family always enterin EU thru madrid. Paris, Zurich etc all are better.

Is this only us or do other people have the same experience?

14 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineBirdwatching From Germany, joined Sep 2003, 3823 posts, RR: 51
Reply 1, posted (1 year 3 months 1 week 4 days 16 hours ago) and read 3737 times:

If you're talking about EU immigration requirements for a tourist visa, all EU ports of entry should have the exact same policies and they should be clearly stated somewhere. You can probably find that document on the internet and they can have a printout with them.

Soren   



All the things you probably hate about travelling are warm reminders that I'm home
User currently offlineRussianJet From Belgium, joined Jul 2007, 7704 posts, RR: 21
Reply 2, posted (1 year 3 months 1 week 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 3624 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

You may generally find that when seeking entry to a foreign country (not including EU citizens travelling within the EU for example though) you may be asked to demonstrate that you have funds to support you for your intended stay. This is neither news nor specific to Spain. It's a pretty common, basic immigration requirement.


✈ Every strike of the hammer is a blow against the enemy. ✈
User currently offlinePHAON From Spain, joined May 2013, 10 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (1 year 3 months 1 week 4 days 13 hours ago) and read 3249 times:

He has a point. The Spanish treat Latin American visitors like dog dirt both at MAD and BCN. Mexico has now stationed a consular officer in the Madird airport to assist Mexicans arriving, due to constant harassment by the Spanish authorities.
Then again, my wife (Latin American) was harassed and taken to secondary in AMS for no reason as well. You never know....but Spain is bad. I live there, love the place, but the airport immigration at both MAD and BCN can resemble the Gestapo at times.


User currently offlineRussianJet From Belgium, joined Jul 2007, 7704 posts, RR: 21
Reply 4, posted (1 year 3 months 1 week 4 days 8 hours ago) and read 2772 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting PHAON (Reply 3):
He has a point. The Spanish treat Latin American visitors like dog dirt both at MAD and BCN. Mexico has now stationed a consular officer in the Madird airport to assist Mexicans arriving, due to constant harassment by the Spanish authorities.
Then again, my wife (Latin American) was harassed and taken to secondary in AMS for no reason as well. You never know....but Spain is bad. I live there, love the place, but the airport immigration at both MAD and BCN can resemble the Gestapo at times.

Maybe, but the point is that if you want to travel long-distance to foreign countries without cash, it would be wise to figure out how you're going to be able to demonstrate your ability to fund your stay if required to do so.



✈ Every strike of the hammer is a blow against the enemy. ✈
User currently offlineSIA747Megatop From Singapore, joined Apr 2012, 298 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (1 year 3 months 1 week 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 2723 times:

Quoting RussianJet (Reply 4):
Maybe, but the point is that if you want to travel long-distance to foreign countries without cash, it would be wise to figure out how you're going to be able to demonstrate your ability to fund your stay if required to do so.

Yes but OP states that "if they only bring credit cards they get trouble". This is bizarre.



That's Mr. Bovine Joni to you.
User currently offlineRussianJet From Belgium, joined Jul 2007, 7704 posts, RR: 21
Reply 6, posted (1 year 3 months 1 week 4 days ago) and read 2681 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting SIA747Megatop (Reply 5):
Yes but OP states that "if they only bring credit cards they get trouble". This is bizarre.

Right, because a credit card doesn't demonstrate funds are available. That's why I further stated that if you don't want to bring cash you'll need to figure out what documents you might want to bring to demonstrate your ability to support yourself financially during your stay. There's really nothing too strange about it. Many countries around the world are interested in finding out whether you can afford your stay before they let you in - cards alone prove very little.



✈ Every strike of the hammer is a blow against the enemy. ✈
User currently offlinejoacocifuentes From Argentina, joined Sep 2012, 122 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (1 year 3 months 1 week 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 2641 times:

I have heard about this. Personally, last time I went thru MAD I had no drama. We showed our ticket back to Argentina and that's it. I gotta add I arrived in a plane from Russia, but we had our Argentinian passports. Also if you show your spanish passport (if you have it) you wont have problems.

User currently offlineAR385 From Mexico, joined Nov 2003, 6240 posts, RR: 31
Reply 8, posted (1 year 3 months 1 week 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 2569 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting PHAON (Reply 3):
He has a point. The Spanish treat Latin American visitors like dog dirt both at MAD and BCN. Mexico has now stationed a consular officer in the Madird airport to assist Mexicans arriving, due to constant harassment by the Spanish authorities.

Yep. This harrassment reached the point Brazil and Mexico had to have a Tete a Tete at the highest level with their Spanish counterparts. Many Latin Americans with all the requirements have been taken to "the little room" and deported. Argentines, particularly seem to suffer from the issue specially. Brazil at some point said that for every Brazilian deported with no justification upon arrival they were going to deport the same number of Spanish, upon arrival.

Things seemed to have quieted down lately, though but not for the Argentines, apparently.

Quoting joacocifuentes (Reply 7):
Also if you show your spanish passport (if you have it) you wont have problems.

You are kidding right? How can you be denied entry to the country you are a citizen of?

Quoting RussianJet (Reply 6):
Right, because a credit card doesn't demonstrate funds are available.

I have trouble understanding the OP´s post but with all due respect, RussianJet, this is a serious issue that is happening only with Latin Americans at Spanish airports. It seems to have stopped with Mexico and Brazil, AFTER the issue was raised in very stern terms with the Spanish.

It seems to keep occuring with the Argentines, though. One striking example was an Argentine teacher INVITED for a sabbatical to lecture at the Complutense in Madrid. She had everything in order and was still sent back on the next flight. I don´t even want to know how it is with citizens of other countries like Ecuador, Paraguay, Bolivia, etc.


User currently offlineRussianJet From Belgium, joined Jul 2007, 7704 posts, RR: 21
Reply 9, posted (1 year 3 months 1 week 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 2519 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting AR385 (Reply 8):
but with all due respect, RussianJet, this is a serious issue that is happening only with Latin Americans at Spanish airports. It seems to have stopped with Mexico and Brazil, AFTER the issue was raised in very stern terms with the Spanish.

This is the perception, but unless any of you actually know for certain that border officers there don't question or stop anyone else, it's just a perception. There may well be a reason for it in terms of pressure of numbers. Every country has nationalities that pose greater or lesser problems in general to their borders, no matter how offended we might choose to be at that fact.

Quoting AR385 (Reply 8):
She had everything in order and was still sent back on the next flight. I don´t even want to know how it is with citizens of other countries like Ecuador, Paraguay, Bolivia, etc.

Again, without being involved in that situation, I would doubt that we know all the facts about that. There are many potential issues we don't know about. Ask anyone who's ever had an immigration problem and they'll invariably feel hard done by - it goes with the territory. Rules can be complex, circumstances can be complex. people can be selective. It's rarely as simple as it first appears.



✈ Every strike of the hammer is a blow against the enemy. ✈
User currently offlineAR385 From Mexico, joined Nov 2003, 6240 posts, RR: 31
Reply 10, posted (1 year 3 months 1 week 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 2516 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting RussianJet (Reply 9):
This is the perception, but unless any of you actually know for certain that border officers there don't question or stop anyone else, it's just a perception.

I can only speak for Brazil and Mexico. It stops being a perception when officials at the highest level in each countries´ respective Ministries for Foreing Affairs have had conversations with their counterparts in Spain. Governments don´t do that when it´s a perception, the press does.

As for the other countries it may be a perception. I don´t have info. for those.


User currently offlineRussianJet From Belgium, joined Jul 2007, 7704 posts, RR: 21
Reply 11, posted (1 year 3 months 1 week 3 days ago) and read 2495 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting AR385 (Reply 10):
Governments don´t do that when it´s a perception

It depends on what you mean. They of course intervene when they perceive that there's a serious problem as a result of many nationals being stopped or refused, but to what degree there is a lawful basis for those instances is a completely different issue. In any event, it's also worth bearing in mind that basing someone at the airport to provide consular help to those affected does not indicate any ability to directly influence the application of laws at the Spanish border. Conversations between politicians will take place of course, but this again does not mean that there's no actual basis for anyone to be subjected to greater scrutiny or refused entry. A country's representatives will naturally always try and help their own people and speak up for them. The difficult thing of course is that where many people of a certain nationality might be held up for genuine reasons, there is the risk of a negative bias creeping in that might affect more genuine travellers of the same nationality. That of course is not an acceptable thing, but unfortunately the blame for that does go two ways if a country exhibits a higher proportion of immigration problems and a higher level of immigration risk to a particular country's borders. Difficult for those who get caught up in it, but then hypothetically if a particular country started to show very high levels of illegal immigration to your country, for example, you might well consider that the nationals of that country should be subjected to a higher level of immigration scrutiny too. I am playing devil's advocate here because while we might on a personal level be familiar with cases here or there, and anecdotal reports of politics and consular moves,we probably do not have all relevant facts at hand to fully know both sides of the situation under discussion, that might very well need to take into account some very legitimate concerns on the Spanish side.



✈ Every strike of the hammer is a blow against the enemy. ✈
User currently offlinemad99 From Spain, joined Mar 2012, 575 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (1 year 3 months 1 week 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 2462 times:

Quoting PHAON (Reply 3):
due to constant harassment by the Spanish authorities.

North Americans do not require visas so i find this strange.

Quoting RussianJet (Reply 4):
Maybe, but the point is that if you want to travel long-distance to foreign countries without cash, it would be wise to figure out how you're going to be able to demonstrate your ability to fund your stay if required to do so.

Immigration might not let you in if they suspect your not telling the truth. If travelling to usa on biz to attend meetings you say "attending meetings" if you say the word work you very well might have problems.

If you can't answer simple questions or back up what you tell them the red flag goes up!

I travel too much to some countries and that raises the red flag as well.


User currently offlineRussianJet From Belgium, joined Jul 2007, 7704 posts, RR: 21
Reply 13, posted (1 year 3 months 1 week 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 2434 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting mad99 (Reply 12):
North Americans do not require visas so i find this strange.

Nobody mentioned North Americans.....but in any event, the rest of your comment is part of the problem in understanding this. Not requiring a visa prior to travel is NOT the same thing as having an automatic right of entry. There are still requirements that can/should be satisfied, no matter how lax the controls in many Schengen ports of entry. It's the same thing in the UK for example, where let's say a US national does not require a visa. He will still be questioned on arrival to ensure that his intentions are genuine and lawful. If there are significant grounds for doubt, he'll be refused entry.

Quoting mad99 (Reply 12):
Immigration might not let you in if they suspect your not telling the truth. If travelling to usa on biz to attend meetings you say "attending meetings" if you say the word work you very well might have problems.

If you can't answer simple questions or back up what you tell them the red flag goes up!

Well obviously, yes.



✈ Every strike of the hammer is a blow against the enemy. ✈
User currently offlinemad99 From Spain, joined Mar 2012, 575 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (1 year 3 months 1 week 2 days 11 hours ago) and read 2412 times:

Quoting RussianJet (Reply 13):
Nobody mentioned North Americans.

yes this post says Mexicans

Quoting PHAON (Reply 3):
assist Mexicans arriving,
Quoting RussianJet (Reply 13):
Not requiring a visa prior to travel is NOT the same thing as having an automatic right of entry.

Exactly!

If you come from a country that does not require a visa to enter and you have normal reasonable replies to what you'll be doing during your stay you should have no problem.


Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
Need Cheap Flight From Paris To Madrid posted Mon Jul 18 2005 10:20:51 by Nygfan84
Best Way To Avoid Jet Lag To Europe From U.S posted Thu Oct 28 2004 02:26:26 by Jake056
Connecting From DL To PD At IAD? posted Thu Jun 6 2013 14:53:16 by redzeppelin
Checking Luggage At Gate To Avoid Fees posted Thu Jun 6 2013 13:57:06 by questions
From Buffalo To London, On posted Sat May 4 2013 07:29:15 by TurkishWings
Interesting Routings From LON To Asia posted Thu Apr 18 2013 22:04:32 by Fly2yyz
Munich Intl. How Do You Go From T1 To T2? posted Tue Apr 9 2013 15:25:26 by golli
LH Award Tickets From USA To India posted Sun Mar 24 2013 12:57:26 by dtwlax
TK CC Or Finnair J Class From VIE To HKG? posted Tue Mar 12 2013 08:08:55 by canadiantree
CX Y Or BA WTP From CDG To HKG? posted Thu Mar 7 2013 04:31:43 by LY777