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Jetlag: Advice, Please?  
User currently offlineLY777 From France, joined Nov 2005, 2671 posts, RR: 2
Posted (11 months 1 week 9 hours ago) and read 2853 times:

Hi,

I flew to France from USA East Coast last Thrusday (we landed on Friday), and last night, I had a terrible insomnia.
I went to bed at 11.00 pm yestarday, and I started to sleep at... 6.00 am....
This is the first time the jetlag disturbs me so much after a flight from the East Coast.

Any advice?

Thanks


אמא, אני מתגעגע לך
17 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offline777ER From New Zealand, joined Dec 2003, 12082 posts, RR: 18
Reply 1, posted (11 months 1 week 9 hours ago) and read 2843 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
FORUM MODERATOR

Jet lag seriously affected me way worst then normal last December after flying from New Zealand - DTW. The first few nights I found it hard to get to sleep then was wide awake around 3-4am for about 2 hours and asleep again till 11am. After 3 nights of only getting 4-5 hours sleep, it was really starting to affect me. Do you have any sleeping pills? I always get a supply of sleeping pills each year from my doctor for my long haul trips overseas and take half a pill to sleep on the aircraft as the engine noise and flying vibrations always keeps me awake. I used half a tablet each night for around 5 nights and as half a tablet works well on me, I was asleep very quickly and slept well each night. If I did wake up, I was back asleep quickly. On the 6th night I didn't take a pill but fell asleep fairly quick and slept well all night afterwards

User currently offlineWAC From United States of America, joined Nov 2008, 275 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (11 months 1 week 5 hours ago) and read 2803 times:

Go out and party!!!!  

User currently offlineLY777 From France, joined Nov 2005, 2671 posts, RR: 2
Reply 3, posted (11 months 1 week 2 hours ago) and read 2781 times:

Quoting 777ER (Reply 1):

Thanks. Yes, I have sleeping pills, I may use them.

Quoting WAC (Reply 2):

lol



אמא, אני מתגעגע לך
User currently offlineBA677 From UK - England, joined Jan 2012, 74 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (11 months 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 2727 times:

Try to get a flight that arrives in the late afternoon or evening and stay awake as much as possible during the journey. You will then have a long solid sleep when you get back. Never a good idea to rely on sleeping pills to much, they should be the last option.

User currently offlineLY777 From France, joined Nov 2005, 2671 posts, RR: 2
Reply 5, posted (11 months 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 2726 times:

Quoting BA677 (Reply 4):
Try to get a flight that arrives in the late afternoon or evening and stay awake as much as possible during the journey

it is not always posible.
I flew AF690 MIA-CDG on Aug 22nd, arriving Friday morning at 8 am.
The night from Friday to Saturday was OK. But things got worse the following nights.



אמא, אני מתגעגע לך
User currently offlinersrik From India, joined Oct 2008, 160 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (11 months 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 2723 times:

The key is to regulate yourself as much as possible in the first 1-2 days. Do whatever you can to avoid sleeping during daytime those first 2 days (although in some cases, it might not be possible). Take a sleeping aid for the first 1-2 nights; I used Melatonin suppliments on numerous occasions with successful results. If ever I wake up in the middle of the night, the Melatonin would put me back to sleep very soon. If not, I would watch TV for a while, which would help me back to sleep in a short time. Try something similar that might work for you.

Even with Melatonin, I took 3-4 days to completely get over jet lag. So, be mentally prepared for it and plan accordingly.


User currently offlineMIAspotter From Spain, joined Nov 2001, 2735 posts, RR: 25
Reply 7, posted (11 months 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 2718 times:

Jetlag has rarely affected me.

What I do is to psicologically adapt to the time zone I am travelling to.

If for example I am flying from MIA to europe, it is usually a night flight arriving early morning, so I just set my watch to the local time, and on arrival I try to stay awake all day, being outdoors helps your internal clock to adapt.

Yes, you will be wrecked by the day´s end but you will sleep like a rock.

MIAspotter.



I think, therefore I don´t fly Ryanair.
User currently offline777ER From New Zealand, joined Dec 2003, 12082 posts, RR: 18
Reply 8, posted (11 months 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 2702 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
FORUM MODERATOR

Quoting BA677 (Reply 4):
Try to get a flight that arrives in the late afternoon or evening and stay awake as much as possible during the journey.

Sadly that isn't always possible. Each time I fly direct to DTW I'm travelling for between 28-34 hours depending on connections. Just flying WLG-AKL-LAX means an arrival either at 12.30 or 2.30pm after nearly 18 hours travelling and already being awake for nearly 30 hours due to the time of the departing flight. My last trip in June to MIA I broke the travel into two sectors with an overnight stay in LAX which certainly helped me to adjust

I work a 24/7 roster with frequent night shifts and I'm frequently awake for 26 hours before getting back to bed after the first night shift. Being awake for that long certainly helps me with long haul travel but the jetlag and changing time zones doesn't help as I end up being awake for longer to try and enable a good nights sleep


User currently offlineYflyer From United States of America, joined Feb 2007, 1003 posts, RR: 1
Reply 9, posted (11 months 6 days 4 hours ago) and read 2662 times:

Quoting MIAspotter (Reply 7):
What I do is to psicologically adapt to the time zone I am travelling to.

If for example I am flying from MIA to europe, it is usually a night flight arriving early morning, so I just set my watch to the local time, and on arrival I try to stay awake all day, being outdoors helps your internal clock to adapt.

This is exactly what I do when I'm traveling east and have to take a redeye flight, as most USA-Europe flights are. I am never able to get very much sleep on the flight, but once I'm at my destination I force myself to stay awake until it's my normal bed time at my destination. At that point I'm completely exhausted and I sleep like a rock, but the next day I wake up at a reasonable time and am completely over the jetlag and can sleep on a normal schedule at my destination's time zone.


User currently offlinespacecadet From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 3609 posts, RR: 12
Reply 10, posted (11 months 6 days ago) and read 2634 times:

I fly to Japan at least once a year, which is a 13 or 14 hour difference from where I am - it is difficult for jetlag to get any worse, and you get it in both directions. Normally they say you get it worse one way than the other, but that's because you're usually going later one way and earlier the other... not really the case when going literally halfway around the world. You end up with a 36 hour "day" in both directions, plus the fatigue of a 12-14 hour flight itself.

I've had 13 years of doing this to try to figure out a way to avoid it, and nothing really works 100%. I agree with those that say forcing yourself to stay up on the first day does help, though it can be very hard. It helps to plan something special on that day. Sometimes we go stay with my in-laws for the first few days and they just sit around and watch TV and that makes it pretty much impossible to stay awake. If I can, I try to get them to at least go out with us to a restaurant where I know we'll be eating for hours - that gives me something to physically do. But ideally, I try to schedule some exciting event on that first night.

I also try to stay up *late* on that first day, as late as possible. Reason is I know I'm going to wake up in the middle of the night otherwise, no matter how tired I am. My body still knows it's "supposed" to be morning, so after 2-3 hours of sleep, I'm back up. I can sometimes get around that - or at least make that wakeup time a less ridiculous hour - by staying up until 1 or 2 AM. By then I am completely trashed, of course, but I've still had a full day and the next day should be more comfortable.

My internal clock doesn't reset immediately so I still go 4 or 5 days when I'll feel totally fine through the day until about 5PM, then I crash. I just stay out and put myself in situations where I physically can't sleep. I know some people go back to their hotels to "rest" periodically and that's a bad idea if you're jetlagged. After a while, the feeling of tiredness does pass and I'm fine until I get back to my hotel (or in-laws' house) later at night. This is much worse if I haven't had the "hell day" on the first day and stayed up really late. If you give in on that first day, your clock will be really screwed up.

When I come home I go through all the same things because by then, I've just gotten used to Japan time and now I need to reset again. It can be even harder because now I've just got routine stuff to keep me awake, so I do end up falling asleep at odd hours (sometimes while in the middle of typing on my computer!) for weeks sometimes.



I'm tired of being a wanna-be league bowler. I wanna be a league bowler!
User currently offlineViscount724 From Switzerland, joined Oct 2006, 24865 posts, RR: 22
Reply 11, posted (11 months 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 2619 times:

Quoting spacecadet (Reply 10):
I fly to Japan at least once a year, which is a 13 or 14 hour difference from where I am

If you ignore the International Date Line (which isn't relevant to your body clock) the time difference between NYC and Japan is actually 11 hours in the summer and 10 hours in the winter. For example, it's currently 9:23 AM in Japan and 8:23 PM in NYC, difference of 11 hours (and of course one day later in Japan).


User currently offlinejagflyer From Canada, joined Aug 2004, 3496 posts, RR: 4
Reply 12, posted (11 months 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 2615 times:

I have never done any serious long-haul except for YYZ-TLV-YYZ about 2 years ago however I have done several trips to the west coast from Toronto which is a 3-4h difference. My method of avoiding jet-lag is you must never think about "what time it actually is at home". I prefer to sleep for 3-5 hours when I arrive (unless it's nighttime in which case I'll sleep a normal 8 hours). This gets me into the rhythm of the local time zone. The small nap helps to alleviate my tiredness and then I can function until it's night at my destination. Set your watch to the local time at your destination on the plane and go!


Support the beer and soda can industry, recycle old airplanes!
User currently offlinePITingres From United States of America, joined Dec 2007, 1123 posts, RR: 13
Reply 13, posted (11 months 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 2483 times:

Quoting rsrik (Reply 6):
Do whatever you can to avoid sleeping during daytime those first 2 days (although in some cases, it might not be possible).

As I get older, I find that I can't stay up straight through on that first day. What does work however is a 2-3 hour nap, no more, as soon as possible after landing. If I'm staying in a hotel, I try to make arrangements for early check-in (and I will sometimes choose the hotel based on that). Set the alarm, make yourself get up, and then go back to bed at a normal time that evening. A drink or small sleeping pill dose can help, although I find that I don't usually need it. If all goes well, there will be maybe another day or two with the mid-afternoon sleepies and then I'm fine.



Fly, you fools! Fly!
User currently offlinen729pa From UK - England, joined Jan 2011, 391 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (10 months 2 weeks 6 days 4 hours ago) and read 1970 times:

Personally I fly to Australia at least once a year. I find two things helps.....drink plenty of fluid - non alcholic ie water/juice, not too much coffee. You will get more tired when you dehydrate.

It does help that I can sleep on a plane quite easily, nap a few hours here and there (it took me about 4 flights to watch The Godfather....kept missing the same bits all the time). I try and pick a evening/night flight out of London. After a long day at work you're tired anyway, so an hour out of LHR dinner is served and you're ready for something to eat. Then you can nap afterwards quite naturally according to your local time. When I get to Oz its like 5/6am .....don't go to bed, either travel onto another city ie Brisbane or Adelaide from SYD/MEL or if you are staying there, stay awake all day. Go to bed perhaps 8pm a bit early and I find I sleep through and wake up next day ready to go. The sooner you get into local time the better. I flew to SYD earlier in the year and then after 3 days flew to PER back 2-3 hours, that missed up my sleep a bit because I had very quickly adjusted to SYD time already.


Coming back a late afternoon flight back, much the same and arrive in LHR early next morning. I get home for 8am and then crash out in front of the TV the rest of the day, napping for several hours here and there. Go to bed as normal and wake up next day and go to work.

We've all got our own ideas and I think it makes the journey itself makes a difference as does the time of day you do it too. It's just trying different things till you get the one that works for you.


User currently offlineflymia From United States of America, joined Jun 2001, 7123 posts, RR: 9
Reply 15, posted (10 months 2 weeks 6 days 1 hour ago) and read 1945 times:

Jetlag usually does not bother me much. I have not had a over 3 hour time difference flight in a while though. However the last time I flew US-Europe about 4 days in my time in Barcelona (was there for 5 months) I had really bad problems getting to sleep. For a few days I slept 2-3 hours at most at night and had about a two days where I had almost no sleep. I finally just got some sleeping pills. Feel asleep at a normal time and had 8-9 hours of straight sleep never had to take another one the rest of my time there. It was about time it was almost my second week!

Anyway I say if you just need help adjusting taking a pill once or twice is nothing to worry about. Plenty of over the counter stuff you can take. There are also plenty of natural pills out there which help you fall asleep when taken 30-60mins before you get into bed.

When flying East to West I try to just get as much sleep as possible on the flight. And even if I don't get any sleep I don't take a nap or get any sleep on arrival. Just ride out the tiredness drink lots of coffee and try to do active exciting things. But then I will try to hold off sleep as long as possible that night, not wanting to fall asleep too early and then end up wakng up at 4am.

East to West I have never had much of a problem.

Its all about trying your best to prepare the day or two before and the second I get on that airplane the watch goes to my destination time zone. However, sometimes its just not possible to prepare and that's when the sleeping pills or other remedies have to come out.



"It was just four of us on the flight deck, trying to do our job" (Captain Al Haynes)
User currently offlineTWA772LR From United States of America, joined Nov 2011, 1747 posts, RR: 1
Reply 16, posted (10 months 2 weeks 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 1909 times:

Exercise is a very good way. Cardio especially. Jetlag used to never affect me until I came back from SYD a few weeks ago. Even when I got to SYD it didn't affect me. I was lethargic the next two days after arriving back home in Houston. I have never missed a lap pool so much in my life.


Go coogs! \n//
User currently offlineSUPER63DL From United States of America, joined Apr 2013, 18 posts, RR: 0
Reply 17, posted (10 months 2 weeks 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 1734 times:

I have been traveling from the US west coast to the middle east, LAX/TLV, once a month for awhile now and the only combination that works for me is sleep on the flight as much as possible. Then, upon arrival, stay up until midnight. the flights that I have been on leave at about 13:50, and arrive the same time, next day.
Strangely the return trip is harder on me, leaving 01:30 arriving about 06:00 same day. usually east to west has been easier for me in the past(LAX/HNL, or east coast to west coast). The long haulers seem to jack me over. Staying up until midnight is key for me, but not always easy.


  

SUPER63DL

[Edited 2013-09-15 19:05:43]

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