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Cheatlined Liveries. Should They Make A Come Back?  
User currently offlineAirOrange From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (9 years 9 months 2 weeks 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 5306 times:

We had a little discussion with AeroWesty about the use of cheatlines/overall paintings which are not soo common anymore like in the past. Some airlines still have it like Air Mauritius, KLM, LTU, El Al, Gulfair, Singapore Airlines, Continental, Greenland Air,Virgin Atlantic etc. etc.

Many airlines however follow fashion and have trashed their cheatline/all over painted liveries in favor for a soo called "eurowhite"-billboard livery aslike for example TAP Portugal, Ethiopian, JAL, Air France, Cyprus Airways, Thai, Martinair etc. etc. With these liveries you do not always recognized with what airline you're dealing because in some angles you do not see their livery at all. Ofcourse from the point of costeffectiveness we can imagine why airlines do this.

Do you think the cheatlined/overall painted liveries are outdated or would they have an opportunity to make a revival by improvements?

Below you see how it went with Cyprus Airways. Our design below demonstrates how a re-introduction could make an airline fashionable again.

Best regards,
Lila Design, the Netherlands


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24 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineA350 From Germany, joined Nov 2004, 1101 posts, RR: 22
Reply 1, posted (9 years 9 months 2 weeks 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 5226 times:

Why exactly is it called "cheatline" and why was it normally over the windows? Did the airlines want to hide the windows and "cheat" that the fuselage looks smoother?

A350



Photography - the art of observing, not the art of arranging
User currently offlineAirOrange From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (9 years 9 months 2 weeks 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 5197 times:

To make the planes look longer which was important during the "prop switch over to jet age". In those times bigger meant more success, comfort, faster.

User currently offlineA319114 From Netherlands, joined Aug 2004, 541 posts, RR: 3
Reply 3, posted (9 years 9 months 2 weeks 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 5164 times:

First of all, I really like that concept of the Cyprus Airways livery.

However, I don't agree with your statement that cheatline liveries are easier to recognize. First of all, I think the tail is the first thing people look at, so a recognisable tail will go a long way. Secondly, bill board type liveries are instantly recognisable by just reading the titles. Martinair, TAP and of course Easyjet couldn't have done a better job with that in mind.



Destruction leads to a very rough road but it also breeds creation
User currently offlineConcordeBoy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (9 years 9 months 2 weeks 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 5161 times:

YES!

Please bring them back... getting so sick of the all-white liveries!


User currently offline777Heaven From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2005, 30 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (9 years 9 months 2 weeks 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 5158 times:

I read somewhere that in the past airlines were limited on the sorts of liveries they could have.

This meant the cheatline could give airline liveries more definiton for their brands as it was easy to apply.

Nowadays newer technologies make it possible to apply more complex designs so I think they should definitely make a comeback because I for one am sick of eurowhite schemes.


User currently offlineByrdluvs747 From United States of America, joined Jul 2004, 2424 posts, RR: 1
Reply 6, posted (9 years 9 months 2 weeks 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 5103 times:

Here's a thought. How about airlines design better liveries instead of going back to 707 era. Cheatlines are soooo boring and unoriginal.



The 747: The hands who designed it were guided by god.
User currently offlineAirOrange From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (9 years 9 months 2 weeks 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 5024 times:

A319114,

Agree about the tailfin design: this must be the most important item in a livery but that doesn't justify always to leave the fuselage empty with just billboard sized texts.

Byrdluys747,

Agree several cheatline designs make planes look oldfashioned however we think when it is done smartly it could look just very fine. What about Air Mauritius, it's a classic cheatline though it's does not look ugly/old on a new jet like the Airbus 350. And the Mohawk on the A333. See thumbnails:


Modified Airliner Photos:

Design © Lila Design
Template © Lila Design




Modified Airliner Photos:

Design © Lila Design
Template © Lila Design



User currently offlineRedDragon From United Kingdom, joined Jul 2004, 1135 posts, RR: 6
Reply 8, posted (9 years 9 months 2 weeks 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 4991 times:

El Al, Gulf Air, Greenland Air and Virgin Atlantic don't have liveries with cheatlines - in fact none of the first three's previous liveries contained them either.

Although I'm not a fan of the eurowhite concept per se, I do think it goes well in some schemes - particularly those of (off the top of my head) Ethiopian and, arguably, JAL (eurocream anyone?). Conversely, personally I don't like Lila's Cyprus Airways or Mohawk concepts - the former isn't anywhere near modern enough. Granted, Cyprus' current livery is poor, but this concept seems to me too much of a retrograde step. Ditto Air Mauritus - I don't think that's a good example of a modern, stylish cheatline livery.

See bmi for a carrier with (in my opinion) a livery that's neither cheatlined nor eurowhite, and looks great!


...what's this, ConcordeBoy participating in a liveries thread??

Rich


User currently offlineArgonaut From UK - Scotland, joined Dec 2004, 422 posts, RR: 1
Reply 9, posted (9 years 9 months 2 weeks 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 4938 times:

AirOrange;

Your Cyprus Airways visualisation is great. For a long time, I have thought how agreeable it would be if the cheatline made a come-back, preferably in some fresh interpretation.

Some years ago, Delta introduced a new livery (their first update in decades) and, instead of drifting down the "eurowhite" path, actually became what seemed like the first major airline in ages to include a cheatline in a new livery. The styling was traditional yet fresh, with a subtle taper towards the rear. Barely a year later...it was gone, replaced by a version of...eurowhite. What a shame.

It's rather a long time since I last saw a good new airline livery of any sort. British Airways is utterly dull, with no sense of solidity (that speedmarque is a joke...it always makes me think of a long piece of toilet-paper caught on a car radio aerial, blowing in the wind). The old Icelandair livery might have begun to look a little tired, but there must have been something better than simply retreading the same old white-top-blue-belly idea for a new livery; the result has lost any hint of Icelandic identity. And the new TAP livery is a nice attempt at originality, but it simply tries too hard and ends up looking self-conscious.

What was great about the old TAP colour scheme was its imaginative use of....guess what? Yes, the cheatline! It mixed opposing colours not usually used together with an unconventional mix of thick/narrow bands. Yes, the Eastern Airlines-style sweep up the tail-fin was old fashioned (before the eurowhite deluge, that was the last airline livery cliche), but the rest was great, notably the typeface that never grew old.

The most unsuitable new trend in livery design is the "wavy line" fashion (AirTran, bmi, Southwest, Boeing 787 house colours, etc), which almost always give an aircraft an overweight look and emphasises "fun" at the expense of "dependability". Most simply look excessive---especially bmi, which is frankly ridiculous.

I think the reason so many colour-schemes of the 1960s and 70s now look old-fashioned is largely to do with the fact that, most often, the aircraft belly remained in natural metal. A cheatline with a substantial area of white or other light colour below it can look highly effective, as witness the TWA 1976-1996 livery.

I heartily commend your interest in rethinking the cheatline! I just hope some airline executives pay attention to this forum...

Argonaut



'the rank is but the guinea stamp'
User currently offlineAeroWesty From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 20785 posts, RR: 62
Reply 10, posted (9 years 9 months 2 weeks 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 4934 times:

Cheatlines, how delicious. One of my favorite topics!

AirOrange posted in the other thread about how the Skyteam members Continental and KLM had retained a distinctive cheatline that's been lost over the years by partners KLM and Air France, which I'd add Delta to the list. And it got me thinking about the impact of global alliances in the future, seamless travel, and the importance of the same worldwide identity that Pan Am's blue ball, TWA's twin globes, Air France's winged seahorse, etc. used to convey individually.

Walking up to the gate you didn't need to see past the cockpit windows to know where you belonged. When you boarded the plane, confirmation was there what airline you were departing on that day. Liveries came right up to welcome you on board. The great liveries over time have also retained a name, as they defined travel. "The Proud Bird with the Golden Tail." "Speedbird." "Centaur." "Clipper." "Friendship." "Astrojet." These are all words and phrases we can match to a specific airline, maybe a memory of our flights and experiences with them, that are as historic and meaningful as "The Silk Route," "The Coral Route," or "The Polar Route" in general terms have become. There's also a specific cheatline in our memories that correspond to each word or phrase. "The Coral Route" may conjure up memories of Air New Zealand to one, or UTA to another, but one knew exactly where they were headed with its mere utterance.

The same can't be said today. Someone else called the current style of design a "humpback" cheatline, and I wholeheartedly agree with that description. It's a downward flow that pulls your eye away from the tail, where all the money and energy to define a brand has been spent. Away with them!

Rikkus67 used this photo to illustrate a point, the "Proud Wings" design for Canadi>n. I never knew it had a name. Thank you. This plane perfectly exemplifies the direction I think liveries should go in the future. A unique and identifiable cheatline incorporated into a design that almost makes the plane look like it wants to take flight just sitting there, while never losing definition of an airline's heritage and purpose in the world.


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The other day I ran across the "Adiemus" commercial for Delta that played in Europe in the mid-90's. The planes were distinctive! They did look like dolphins from the perspective they were filmed. Now we could barely discern Delta from an overpacked holiday charter airline from the same angle.

To return to my original observation, I see no reason why the alliances of today couldn't incorporate the best of their design into something that recognized their partnership, yet individuality, with more than a decal. A tall order, I'm sure, but one that would work towards incorporating the globalization that's our future, yet still being able to have the excitement one used to get when we knew a V-Jet or Viking had arrived in town.

Cheers.  Smile



International Homo of Mystery
User currently offlineKeesje From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (9 years 9 months 2 weeks 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 4918 times:

After lenghty discussion modern cheatlines were choosen by KLM. A not to wild restyle allowed repainting during normal maintenance visits, saving money.



User currently offlineRikkus67 From Canada, joined Jun 2000, 1674 posts, RR: 1
Reply 12, posted (9 years 9 months 2 weeks 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 4878 times:

The original idea behind the cheatline was to camoflauge older DC-4's to look like DC-6's. After WWII, airlines that couldn't afford to upgrade their equipment, painted the frames around the smaller DC-4's windows with a black or grey square, and then ran a stripe down the fuselage. From a distance, the aircraft then looked like the more modern DC-6, with its larger square windows..

The term "cheatline" is exactly what it describes...

DC-4, without cheatline

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Photo © Robert Matthews - FliteZoneImages


DC-4, with cheatline (note the supposed window size)

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Photo © Ger Buskermolen


DC-6, with cheatline

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Photo © Bob Garrard





AC.WA.CP.DL.RW.CO.WG.WJ.WN.KI.FL.SK.ACL.UA.US.F9
User currently offlineAeroWesty From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 20785 posts, RR: 62
Reply 13, posted (9 years 9 months 2 weeks 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 4862 times:

While the livery introduced by TWA in the late 70's was by far from my favorite, it was still distinctive, and carried a familiar image by use of a cheatline recognizable for some 30 or more years at that point. The simple and elegant twin globe livery said "let's go flying today," to me, which I'd usually reply, "okay!" Their 90's livery I would rate as "most improved" and appropriate in the scheme of things, and wish it was still flying around today.


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Photo © Ken Rose
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Photo © Ken Rose




International Homo of Mystery
User currently offlineMakeMinesLAX From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 566 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (9 years 9 months 2 weeks 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 4843 times:

The difficulty with any livery is making is work on every aircraft type in the fleet. This may be a gross over-simplification, but one could point to the sloping window line of the A330/340 as a factor which makes cheatlines an unattractive design feature:


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Photo © Xiao min



User currently offlineFlyboyOz From Australia, joined Nov 2000, 1987 posts, RR: 25
Reply 15, posted (9 years 9 months 2 weeks 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 4796 times:

I am disappointed that most of the livery are not professional enough. Some are good without cheatlines and some arent good with big and wide cheatline such as old and new KLM and LTU.

I have got a new idea of "new" cheatlines. I never see any airlines that have painted "shaded cheatline". I mean a cheatline has "dark red to light red". It would be perfect to have them on the livery. What do you think?

Small and narrow cheatline that placed below the doors or/and windows looks very professional on the livery such as old UAL livery (small orange, red and blue), Contiental and old BA livery.

I like old Lan Chile livery as it was so attractive because the red half-circle is so brighter than background. It stikes the background!!

Cheers

[Edited 2005-02-15 01:34:01]


The Spirit of AustraliAN - Longreach
User currently offlineA388 From Netherlands Antilles, joined May 2001, 9956 posts, RR: 15
Reply 16, posted (9 years 9 months 2 weeks 2 days 16 hours ago) and read 4599 times:

I think that all-white liveries are just the new trend, which most of you already mentioned. I agree with both the people who think eurowhite liveries are boring and the people who think that eurowhite liveries are recognisable. Some all-white liveries can be better. The new Cyprus Airways isn't that bad, but it does look a lot like the one from Egypt Air. From a distance these two airlines can't be separated from each other, because they're practically the same. Not even the tails can be separated from each other. These are one of the few liveries that really look very identical to each other. But they're not that bad. I still like them both Big grin

But like some people already mentioned, some all-white liveries are very well done and recognisable. Martinair's new livery is a perfect example of a eurowhite livery that is very nice and very recognisable. Not only the large billboard titles are very easy to read but the large Martinair logo near the cockpit makes this livery very easy to recognise. Martinair's new livery looks very simple, but it is a well thaught out livery. Ethiopean Airlines new livery is also a very nice one, it will look great on the 787 when they receive them, wow.

Like I've also mentioned in another thread, a new trend is also the virgin-like pearly coloured fuselages. Air Canada, TAP Portugal and maybe THAI all (will) have pearly coloured fuselages and I have to say that it looks very nice on their aircraft. This in my opinion is also a new trend in airline corporate images.

Regards,

A388


User currently offlineAirOrange From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 17, posted (9 years 9 months 2 weeks 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 4535 times:

Hello,

Thank you all for your contributions here. It's indeed a fact that, because of the increasement of technology and knowledge, the opportunities and possibilities for painting/decorating aircraft has increased tremendousely. At the end the choice of a final aircraft paint design is always taken by airlines' directors in good or not so good understanding with their graphic design relations and it will be always a mix between of taste (emotional) and marketing strategy (rational). The tailfin design is the most important item of a aircraft paint design because the tail often sticks out above other aircraft (when lined up) and buildings.

However you cannot denie that some airlines did a very well job and some maybe went too far concerning livery changements.

For example the recent KLM livery change was not that spectacular but what KLM achieved is that the airline shaked off its oldfashioned looking thick dark blue window line. The airline finally preserved its identity by painting a thin blue line instead (under the window). Unbelievable what a difference that makes. It makes the planes younger again and KLM's house colour is herewith emphasized. Not spectacular but very good for the brand KLM!

From the other hand (for example): Sri Lankan, Ethiopian, TAP Portugal, Cyprus Airways had such nice cheatlines but got rid of those. Especially former Ethiopian's (well decorated), TAP Portugal's and Cyprus Airways' (the so recognizable blue-orange-white) cheatlined livery designs had enough potention to be modified to something more sophisticated without trashing history of decades.

Trashing a cheatline is not a sinn but sometimes it's a pitty that airlines do not investigate first how to improve a cheatline before going for something totally new. The "eurowhite" liveries maybe easy, effective and cost saving but they have not soo much to do with an own identity all around the plane.

Best regards,
Lila Design, the Netherlands



User currently offlineDalavia From Australia, joined Feb 2005, 549 posts, RR: 1
Reply 18, posted (9 years 9 months 2 weeks 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 4477 times:

How would a cheatline work on an A380???

Double cheatlines? Or a single cheatline that bears no relationship to the window line? Would a cheatline be lost in the bulk of the fuselage?

I love well designed cheatlines, but I suspect they suit the shape of a DC-6 or 707 rather than most wide-bodies.


User currently offlineKYAir From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 362 posts, RR: 3
Reply 19, posted (9 years 9 months 2 weeks 2 days 13 hours ago) and read 4468 times:

KLM is the nicest cheatline livery in use today. (US Airways' livery is still the prettiest overall, but I'm getting a little bored with it!)

In the past, any of TWA's cheatline schemes were fantastic. All-time classics also are Mohawk and Pan Am from the late '60's to '70's. Piedmont was a nice, simple design. I loved the Delta widget design they used for so many years and really dislike the newest livery (even though I've got a ton of Skymiles!).



Don't cry because it's over, smile because it happened - Dr. Seuss
User currently offlineFlySSC From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 7422 posts, RR: 57
Reply 20, posted (9 years 9 months 2 weeks 2 days 13 hours ago) and read 4474 times:

My answer is..... Y E S !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


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User currently offlineAlitis From United States of America, joined Apr 2000, 259 posts, RR: 0
Reply 21, posted (9 years 9 months 2 weeks 2 days 13 hours ago) and read 4439 times:

Speaking of cheatlines, it seems as if Olympic never changed their livery.......

707


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and over 30years later,

340


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Still looks good!


User currently offlineAirOrange From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 22, posted (9 years 9 months 2 weeks 2 days 13 hours ago) and read 4419 times:

The fat A380 is a bit difficult for small cheatlines however the Air Mauritius, Iraqi, KLM cheatlines are acceptable.


Modified Airliner Photos:

Design © Lila Design
Template © Lila Design




Modified Airliner Photos:

Design © Lila Design
Template © Lila Design




Modified Airliner Photos:

Design © Hoons
Template © Airbus Industrie



A small improvement to the "eurowhite" Airbus livery by implementing a roof and engine painting:


Modified Airliner Photos:

Design © Lila Design
Template © Lila Design



User currently offlineLY4XELD From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 858 posts, RR: 15
Reply 23, posted (9 years 9 months 2 weeks 2 days 11 hours ago) and read 4347 times:

What about AA livery?


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That's why we're here.
User currently offlineUAcsOKC From United States of America, joined Dec 2004, 107 posts, RR: 1
Reply 24, posted (9 years 9 months 6 days ago) and read 4195 times:

Quoting FlyboyOz (reply 15):

I have got a new idea of "new" cheatlines. I never see any airlines that have painted "shaded cheatline". I mean a cheatline has "dark red to light red". It would be perfect to have them on the livery. What do you think?


What about UAs new livery? it has a low cheatline that blends the bottom and top, don't yoou think?


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I love the rumble of a 727 takeoff in the morning!
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