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F/A Burn Out... How Long Is Too Long On The Job?  
User currently offline747hogg From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (8 years 1 month 2 weeks 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 5707 times:

How long before it gets to be a drag, glitter wears off and job becomes a grind.

22 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineC3000FlyBoy From Canada, joined May 2000, 104 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (8 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 5600 times:

Well one must always remember the glamour of our job is only from the moment you step off the crew van until you board the aircraft! You know you look great walking as a big crew through the terminal and everyone is looking at you - that's all for the glam!

I have been flying for seven years and there are certainly a lot of rusty bits between the "glitter" but really it has become a lifestyle - for me anyway - of a lot of time off and good pay. It is a vicious circle! 9 - 5 behind a desk again not for me thanks!

M.



Emergency! Keep your head down, stay down!!
User currently offlineSkyhawk From United States of America, joined May 2001, 1066 posts, RR: 3
Reply 2, posted (8 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 5588 times:

747hogg-Hi, how are you today? You know eventually every job becomes just that, a job. The length of time it takes depends totally on the person. I had the pleasure of flying for over 20 years. It never got to be just a "job". Granted some days were harder to go to work than others, but overall, it was always fantastic. The crews (both cabin and cockpit) varied constantly, so if for some reason you had a problem with somebody, you knew it wouldn't last too long. If there was a problem passenger, you knew they would be gone soon. If you work in an office, school, bank, or something similar, the colleagues you have don't change, so if you can't get along, then your work situation can get difficult.

The time changes did indeed take a toll on the body at times, but we learned to deal with them. In fact, for me at least, the time change between JFK and NRT was easier than say JFK-FRA. Maybe that was because NRT is exactly the opposite(at least really close!).

Today I imagine things are greatly different than when I flew. Companies are not as supportive as they used to be. Passengers don't dress anything like they used to-maybe that is a sign of the times-everything is more relaxed than it used to be. People used to treat a flight as if it was an event, not today. That too is a sign of the times.

If your dream is to work for an airline, I say by all means pursue that dream! You will, I am sure, love it.

Have a good day! Skyhawk


User currently offlineIAirAllie From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (8 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 5491 times:

I've noticed several turnover points. In the first year every airline has a pretty high turnover as you have lots of newbies who didn't realize what the job was really like and had a difficult time being away from family. Then about year two you have another crop who have seen what they wanted to see and move on. Same thing around year 5 lots who want to go back to school, get married/start a family etc. After that people tend to quit in much smaller numbers until retirement. I've found that for me charter is more interesting because you have more variety than with a scheduled carrier. I want to note that senority is not negatively correlated with quality of service. Some of the absolute best FA's I've flown with were the in the 32+ years of service set. Some of the worst attitudes were new hires.

User currently offlineLhrmaccoll From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (8 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 5488 times:

No doubt any job will become a chore after the novelty has worn off.
I'm sure for some, there is no novelty in the first place...


User currently offlineRDYNYC From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 65 posts, RR: 1
Reply 5, posted (8 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 12 hours ago) and read 5327 times:

For some of us, after a while, we need more of a mental challenge at the job which we don't really get being a F/A. You start feeling as if you've stopped growing mentally. Interesting comment regarding walking through the terminal and people looking at you. I felt that stopped years ago. The public "allure" of our job in my observation has ceased for the most part. People know that it's not the glamorous job it once was - they just know that now. F/A's hired (sorry to offend if I do) in more recent years don't carry themselves with that same poise and demeanor of class in the way the speak, look, handle passengers, etc....the lifestyle and I mean the "LIFESTYLE" of being a Flight Attendant in my mind has really become nothing more than just a job where you work on a plane! The career has deteriorated in a lot of areas at least for USA airlines - it's very unfortunate!

User currently offlineZvezda From Lithuania, joined Aug 2004, 10511 posts, RR: 64
Reply 6, posted (8 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 12 hours ago) and read 5310 times:

Those with 60+ years experience should move on.

User currently offlineJamake1 From United States of America, joined May 2004, 1009 posts, RR: 2
Reply 7, posted (8 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 5209 times:

Quoting Zvezda (Reply 6):
Those with 60+ years experience should move on.

Sound advice...



United's B747-400. "She's a a cruel lover."
User currently offlineAloha73G From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 2362 posts, RR: 4
Reply 8, posted (8 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 6 hours ago) and read 5107 times:

I have flown with 5 of Aloha's most senior F/As (40+years) and also with many Aloha F/As with 30+ years and they are all amazing!! You can tell they love their jobs and they make sure you know they do.

Hawaiian has many who were hired int he early-mid 80s who are also superb.

I think the ones who stick around do so because they LOVE it, and when people love their jobs, you can tell!!

-Aloha!



Aloha Airlines - The Spirit Moves Us. Gone but NEVER Forgotten. Aloha, A Hui Hou!
User currently offlineStarCityFlyr From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (8 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 6 hours ago) and read 5091 times:

Quoting Zvezda (Reply 6):
Those with 60+ years experience should move on.



Quoting Jamake1 (Reply 7):
Sound advice...

Perhaps those that have 60+ years of experience may not need to be working, but don't disregard the wealth of knowledge and real-time information that could make life for the "newbies" a lot easier. I've learned a lot from people who are senior to me.

I'm reminded of a story from a friend who's an F/A with NW. Seems as though a senior member of a flight crew was taking up meal trays. As she was coming down the aisle, one passenger was insistent that she take one more tray even though they were stacked up to her chin. After much insistence by the rather "dumb" passenger, this "Senior F/A" relented and said "Sure, just stack it on my head; and while you're at it, tie a broom to by a$$ and I'll just sweep the plane at the same time!" While perhaps not exactly a gleaming example of customer service, I laugh every time I think about it. Sometimes you just have to call them as you see them.

Happy Flying Everyone! (Especially to those with 60+ years!!!!)  listen 


User currently offlineLTBEWR From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 13113 posts, RR: 12
Reply 10, posted (8 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 5 hours ago) and read 5056 times:

I would assume that the changes in the airline industry, especially in the USA market, affects the desire for an f/a to stay in the job. Over the last 5-6 years, the bad financial conditions of airlines has led to major pay and benefit cuts has to have a huge affect, when an office job may pay better. I would also assume also that the odd hours, short times for sleep between flights on some assignments, more crowded flights, smaller a/c, more demanding and obnoxious pax all affect the desire to contiune as well.

User currently offlineSkyhawk From United States of America, joined May 2001, 1066 posts, RR: 3
Reply 11, posted (8 years 1 month 2 weeks 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 4937 times:

StarCityFlyr-I love the response you mentioned! Years ago when flying for National we were picking up meal trays(no carts in the cabin yet). I had over six trays in my hands, a short time to landing, and a man said, "Honey, ya' got any matches on you?" I said, "No, but I'll be glad to get you some if you can help me out" He asked how. I put the trays on his lap and calmly walked back to the galley and got him a book of matches. I went back to him, handed him the matches and collected the trays from him. You should have heard the ribbing that he got from all of his buddies!! Bet he never did that again.

User currently offlineRDYNYC From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 65 posts, RR: 1
Reply 12, posted (8 years 1 month 2 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 4771 times:

Starcityflyr.....I gotta laugh. That story about the F/A being handed one tray too many has been an airline urban legend since waaaayyyy back! What's funny about it - every airline claims it was "their" F/A who said it! I heard about it at Pan Am! I gotta say, I'd be almost certain it wasn't Northwest though! Can't say why but I just don't think it would have been them.....

User currently offlineSean-SAN- From United States of America, joined Aug 2002, 769 posts, RR: 1
Reply 13, posted (8 years 1 month 2 weeks 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 4735 times:

I have a co-worker who's now making great money as a project manager... she said she loved the job (ex Pam-Am during the galmour days) but the best thing that ever happened to her was getting out of the industry when Pan-Am died. Otherwise she said she'd still be working there.

User currently offlinePilotaydin From Turkey, joined Sep 2004, 2539 posts, RR: 51
Reply 14, posted (8 years 1 month 2 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 4691 times:

our gals n guys in cabin are really pushing their limits this month, flying around 110 hours per month with duty times always reaching legal max, it's 180 here i think i dont have my FOM with me...

the sucky part is we the pilots and the cabin crew are assigned 4 legs per each day, and we max out almost at 14 hours of duty, and if we do max out, the captain has the right to extend it to 16 hours to bring the a/c home...ech!

can't wait till summer is over lol



The only time there is too much fuel onboard, is when you're on fire!
User currently offlineFlyGuyClt From United States of America, joined Aug 2005, 537 posts, RR: 8
Reply 15, posted (8 years 1 month 2 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 4634 times:

There seems to be airline sentiment lately on the board towards flying and cabin crew. Here is a little experiment. The next time you fly. When you get on board. Look the F/A in the eye, smile, and say Good Morning, Afternoon, Evening or whatever. My guess.....You'll get much better service. Some are burned out yes, some can be lit back up with a simple smile and acknowledgement. Please and Thank You goes a long long long .........way.

Safe Flying  Smile



Florida Express, Braniff II and ......
User currently offlineStarCityFlyr From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 16, posted (8 years 1 month 2 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 4613 times:

Quoting RDYNYC (Reply 12):
Starcityflyr.....I gotta laugh. That story about the F/A being handed one tray too many has been an airline urban legend since waaaayyyy back! What's funny about it - every airline claims it was "their" F/A who said it! I heard about it at Pan Am! I gotta say, I'd be almost certain it wasn't Northwest though! Can't say why but I just don't think it would have been them.....



RDYNYC, if you read carefully  irked  , I said a friend of mine who's an F/A for NW told me the story. I didn't say that it was a NW F/A that came back with the quick witted retort to the misguided passenger. I would suspect that there are quick witted F/A's at all of the airlines who could have and probably have had very similar situations. The point is not based in who they fly for; rather the kudo goes to the person for calling it like it is.

Happy Flying!


User currently offlineS5FA170 From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 534 posts, RR: 4
Reply 17, posted (8 years 1 month 2 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 4549 times:

Quoting FlyGuyClt (Reply 15):
When you get on board. Look the F/A in the eye, smile, and say Good Morning, Afternoon, Evening or whatever. My guess.....You'll get much better service.

When I am the flight attendant working up front, I make it a point to greet every passenger who walks through the door, and also thank them for flying with us at the end. It always irritates me that half the people who walk on the plane don't even acknowledge me as I stand there and welcome them, or acknowledge me on the way out. How fast do you think they'll be acknowledging my existence should we encounter an emergency situation on board that day?

Oh well. Such is the state of the traveling public.

-Tony



Prepare doors for departure and cross-check.
User currently offlineFlyGuyClt From United States of America, joined Aug 2005, 537 posts, RR: 8
Reply 18, posted (8 years 1 month 2 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 4511 times:

Quoting S5FA170 (Reply 17):
When I am the flight attendant working up front, I make it a point to greet every passenger who walks through the door, and also thank them for flying with us at the end. It always irritates me that half the people who walk on the plane don't even acknowledge me as I stand there and welcome them, or acknowledge me on the way out. How fast do you think they'll be acknowledging my existence should we encounter an emergency situation on board that day?

Oh well. Such is the state of the traveling public.

-Tony

I hear you and see you loud and clear ! If the person is on the cell phone and really seems snotty. I just say something like. "Oh is this your first time to Vegas?" really loud. One day the man's wife on the other end of the phone had to talk to me before she believed her husband was not having an affair ! We were going to NYC. When I told her why I did it. She was laughing so hard she could not stop. Appears, even her well bread family knocks him for being rude.

Safe Flying  Smile



Florida Express, Braniff II and ......
User currently offlineRDYNYC From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 65 posts, RR: 1
Reply 19, posted (8 years 1 month 2 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 4486 times:

THAT is too funny!!!! Sounds like something for a movie! Not sure if I'd want to set myself up for the passengers response to me after I did that though!

User currently offlineOutlier From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 20, posted (8 years 1 month 2 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 4477 times:

Quoting Aloha73G (Reply 8):
I have flown with 5 of Aloha's most senior F/As (40+years) and also with many Aloha F/As with 30+ years and they are all amazing!! You can tell they love their jobs and they make sure you know they do.

Hawaiian has many who were hired int he early-mid 80s who are also superb.

I think the ones who stick around do so because they LOVE it, and when people love their jobs, you can tell!!

 checkmark   checkmark   checkmark   checkmark   checkmark 


Quoting FlyGuyClt (Reply 15):
When you get on board. Look the F/A in the eye, smile, and say Good Morning, Afternoon, Evening or whatever. My guess.....You'll get much better service.

I always greet the FAs unless they are obviously working on something.
And I say goodbye, thanks, see ya later (often do), too.

I've had a couple of bad experiences, talked about one here a few weeks ago. But overall 99% have always taken pride in their work so far as I can tell.


User currently offlinePualani From United States of America, joined May 2004, 301 posts, RR: 6
Reply 21, posted (8 years 1 month 1 week 4 days 13 hours ago) and read 4439 times:

I fly alot at the front of the plane but there are the days when I dont and my favorite position is the 4L or 4R doors. Why is that you ask ? Well one reason
is I dont have to say goodbye and thank you at 1L door. People are just getting more and more rude. After the main meal and beverage service is done, we walk periodically through the cabin with water or juice and I just love it when people shake their glass at me and then dont even offer a thank you.

pualani


User currently offlineOutlier From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 22, posted (8 years 1 month 1 week 4 days 13 hours ago) and read 4437 times:

Quoting Pualani (Reply 21):
Why is that you ask ? Well one reason
is I dont have to say goodbye and thank you at 1L door. People are just getting more and more rude.

Don't blame you one bit.

Takes a lot to be "on" all the time. Some of the restraint I've seen on the part of FAs over the years is extraordinary.


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