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Topic: The 727-100
Username: TriJetFan1
Posted 2004-06-01 02:55:04 and read 3086 times.

Was the 721 mainly built for commercial service or cargo service?
What carriers flew them and how many?
Are there any in service in commercial/cargo?

Topic: RE: The 727-100
Username: Jafa
Posted 2004-06-01 02:57:07 and read 3073 times.

Planet Airways flies the 727-100 on charter flights. The aircraft is based in MCO.

Topic: RE: The 727-100
Username: FlagshipAZ
Posted 2004-06-01 03:02:41 and read 3062 times.

United & Eastern were the first to ordered the 721. UA alone had over 100.
AA operated 59 721s. Pan Am, TWA, National, Northeast, Northwest, PSA & Braniff all had them as well. Best place to look at past 721 operators would be the Aeromoe Fleet site. Regards.

Topic: RE: The 727-100
Username: Isitsafenow
Posted 2004-06-01 03:26:15 and read 3039 times.

Some of UA were QC's. NW had 12 QC's and BN first 727's were 727-100QC's.
The QC's had the big cargo door just behind the forward passenger boarding door. Most of the 100's were converted to QC's after life with the carriers.
QC stood for Quick Change. In 30 minutes the seats came out and you had a freighter. I worked em for BN at MKC in the late 60's.
UA could be pegged by the N number. Their 727-100 were N7001-7098 or something like that and the QC's were N7401 to N7424, I think was the last one.
safe

Topic: RE: The 727-100
Username: Arcano
Posted 2004-06-01 03:45:42 and read 3017 times.

Lloyd Aereo Boliviano (Bolivia) and Tame (Ecuador) still flies the 721 in South America. Actually, one of those LB's is the only 721 which remains with the original owner.

)( Arcano

Topic: RE: The 727-100
Username: Dazed767
Posted 2004-06-01 05:27:12 and read 2943 times.

Planet (N1910) is the last -100 series in the US in PAX config.

Aero Continente still has a handful of them.

Topic: RE: The 727-100
Username: Adriaticus
Posted 2004-06-01 08:16:38 and read 2858 times.

FedEx still flies about 37 or 40 of its original B721's... great birds... For as long as you don't intend to fly over the ocean... Mexicana (MX) flew them commercially until 1982.

Glad to be back in the forum... Most specially refering to a bird I am deeply fond of: the Boeing 727. Big thumbs up

__Ad.

Topic: RE: The 727-100
Username: Adriaticus
Posted 2004-06-01 08:24:03 and read 2849 times.


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Photo © Carlos Borda

Topic: RE: The 727-100
Username: JJMNGR
Posted 2004-06-01 13:59:47 and read 2754 times.

I want to know if anyone knows where I can find a plastic model to be built. Need a 1/144 scale.....
I have Transbrasil stickers, old colours!

Topic: RE: The 727-100
Username: American 767
Posted 2004-06-01 14:03:30 and read 2754 times.

In Europe, Lufthansa, Sabena and TAP had them. Lufthansa was the first non US carrier to order the type back in the mid 60's.

Ben Soriano
Brussels Belgium

Topic: RE: The 727-100
Username: Greasespot
Posted 2004-06-01 14:07:16 and read 2749 times.

We at 7F still fly 2 727-100 combis on scheduled service. They are one of the few A/C that can fly into gravel. The 737-200 is payload restricted from YOW to YFB. So we use the 727 on days when we go to YFB and YSR.

GS

Topic: RE: The 727-100
Username: Fallout01
Posted 2004-06-01 14:19:25 and read 2731 times.

Maybe some of you three-holer experts can answer a question for me: didn't the -100 have an oval shaped intake on the #2 engine? If so, it appears that the FedEx version has a round one in the picture. Was there some kind of retrofit? Thanks in advance.

Topic: RE: The 727-100
Username: Dtwclipper
Posted 2004-06-01 14:28:28 and read 2726 times.

Also of interest, the -100 monicker was retroactive. They were known by their two digit code, up until the introduction of the 200 series. For Example, a original order Pan Am 727-121 would have been a 727-21, a BN a/c would have been a 727-27, and an AA would have been a 727-23, and so on.

Topic: RE: The 727-100
Username: AV757
Posted 2004-06-01 15:06:50 and read 2679 times.

Fallout01 yes that is true the 100´s had the oval number 2 engine intake originally, later on some where modified to the round intake, same as the 200´s to optimize air flow to the number 2 engine and prevent engine surges and stalls at high altitude flight; these were called with "mode A" installed by Boeing.

Regards:
AV757

Topic: RE: The 727-100
Username: M404
Posted 2004-06-01 22:06:44 and read 2552 times.

TriJetFan1

Easiest way to see all the 727-100 history is to go to this sites own photo file and do a search by that acft type.

Topic: RE: The 727-100
Username: Milesrich
Posted 2004-06-02 04:46:19 and read 2461 times.

United flew the 727-22 for almost 30 years. Introduced in 1964, the last ones were retired in 1993 or 1994. They were quite a work horse. The prototype, N7001U, was donated to the Boeing Museum of Flight, and another was given to the Museum of Science and Industry. Operating over 120 at one time, they made up about one third of the United Fleet. Originally, they were introduced with S Class One Class 2-3 seating. Later they were configured 24-72, and then the density started to increase. By 1979, they were configured 10-86 with 36" of pitch in coach, and 112 in the Reno All Coach Commuter.

Topic: RE: The 727-100
Username: September11
Posted 2004-06-02 04:57:22 and read 2448 times.

TWA 727-100 ...

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Photo © Frank C. Duarte Jr.



Topic: RE: The 727-100
Username: LVZXV
Posted 2004-06-02 05:32:11 and read 2419 times.

LAB 727-78 "CP-1223" (b. 1964, ff. 05 January 1965). The 2nd oldest passenger-configured 727 still flying, aged 39.5.


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Photo © Rodrigo Egas



A testament to the longevity and excellence of Boeing!

XV

Topic: RE: The 727-100
Username: CV990
Posted 2004-06-02 11:37:30 and read 2358 times.


Hi!

TAP was the 2nd. airline in Europe to order the Boeing 727-100 after LH. The firat order was for 3 airplanes ( CS-TBK, TBL and TBM ), latter TAP ordered 3 more 727's new from Boeing ( CS-TBN, TBO and TBP ), CS-TBO was a QC version ( Quick Change ) and it was mainly used to Azores and Europe. After those TAP got another 2nd. hand 727-100, this time an ex: World Airways 727-172C ( CS-TBQ ). Latter TAP evoluted to the 727-200 Advanced but even then TAP received when the 727-282 ADV CS-TBR crashed in Funchal a leased 727-100 ( CS-TBV ) for about 2 years. I personally flew in 2 of them, both with side cargo door, CS-TBO and CS-TBQ.
regards

Topic: RE: The 727-100
Username: HlywdCatft
Posted 2004-06-02 15:04:00 and read 2300 times.

I remember seeing the red meatball and burnt meatball Continental 727-100s. That was probably when I first noticed the 100. I had been used to the 727-200 at DTW when I was little, but I first I really noticed the 100 was back sometime in the 80s. I knew that a lot were around, but for some reason I only thought that there were the 200s flying (of course back then I didnt know 100 and 200 for the 727, just the short funny looking 727 was what I called the 100.

Topic: RE: The 727-100
Username: Stefandotde
Posted 2004-06-02 17:11:34 and read 2254 times.

As long as the 727-100 is still flying, cerosine is not expensive enough.

Topic: RE: The 727-100
Username: Broke
Posted 2004-06-02 18:21:40 and read 2212 times.

Eastern Airlines was a launch customer for the 727 along with United. The first passenger flights began in December, 1963.
Eastern operated 75 -100's, 50 -025's and 25 -025QC's.
All of their airplanes had P&WA JT8D-7 engines.
There are several differences to determine a -100 from a -200. First, of course, is that the -200 is 20' longer. If you have been around 727's a lot, you really can spot the length difference very easily. Next the #2 engine inlet on the -100 is oval, while it is round on the -200's. I personally do not know of any -100's with a round #2 inlet.
The -100's had a galley service door on the right side, forward of the wing. The -200's had galley service doors on both sides, just forward of the outboard engines.
There were about 600 -100's built and about 1200 -200's built.

Topic: RE: The 727-100
Username: B727-100
Posted 2004-06-04 13:42:07 and read 2105 times.

>>cerosine is not expensive enough.

Looks like you are in the wrong forum...what useless comment really. Bescheuert.

Topic: RE: The 727-100
Username: Stefandotde
Posted 2004-06-04 13:47:44 and read 2089 times.

727-100, you can call it useless and bescheuert.
When you repeat my comments, please repeat whole context: 727-100 used lots of fuel. And if this plane is still flying it seems as if the airlines can afford planes that use that much fuel, it's still too cheap.

You may drink as much vodka as you want. But ever have heared the word "ecology". I fear not. Very sad, dude. So think about it , who is bescheuert.

Topic: RE: The 727-100
Username: Type-rated
Posted 2004-06-04 14:00:03 and read 2068 times.

Years and years ago I took my first serveral airline trips on 727-200's and 707-300's. Then one time I took BN and when I boarded I thought this was very strange, one galley in the center of the plane? Then I walked into the Y section and it was very short back there, it seemed like it only had a few rows of seats compared to the other 727's I had previously been on. I asked the flight crew about this and they told me that the 727 comes in two versions. This was the "abbreviated" version. I thought it was funny that they called it that.

Topic: RE: The 727-100
Username: American 767
Posted 2004-06-04 17:37:45 and read 2007 times.

Broke, it may be true that the first 727-100 series aircraft flew in 1963 but I believe that Eastern and United introduced it in revenue service in 1964, both as co launch customers. It was in Feb of 1964 that Eastern introduced the 727-100. Thanks for the info about the nmb 2 engine inlet on each version, that of the 200 was modified to a round shape to increase the mass flow rate of the air coming into the engine, in the case of the number 2 engine it travels through an S-Duct system before being compressed.

Speaking of Eastern 100's, one was sadly involved in a disaster at JFK in 1975. It departed MSY bound for JFK as flight EA 066. It crashed while trying to land at JFK because of a wind shear, no occupant survived the accident.

Ben Soriano
Brussels Belgium

Topic: RE: The 727-100
Username: LVZXV
Posted 2004-06-04 17:48:19 and read 1994 times.

If I am not mistaken, the 721's first flight was February 9, 1963, and its first revenue service for United was Christmas Day, 1963. Eastern probably followed in early 1964.

XV

Topic: RE: The 727-100
Username: CitationJet
Posted 2004-06-04 17:55:17 and read 1990 times.

It was always easy to identify the 727s when parked at the gate. The -100s had vertically oval #2 inlets, and the -200s had circular inlets. Evidently the re-engined 727-100 used circular inlets also.

727-100 oval:

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727-100 re-engine circular:
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Photo © Derek Pedley - AirTeamImages


727-200 circular:
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Photo © Shane Walker

Topic: RE: The 727-100
Username: Capitol8s
Posted 2004-06-05 01:23:06 and read 1890 times.

Don't forget the interior shots which had many variations....


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Topic: RE: The 727-100
Username: TriJetFan1
Posted 2004-06-05 04:43:52 and read 1825 times.

TriJetFan1

Easiest way to see all the 727-100 history is to go to this sites own photo file and do a search by that acft type


I like to see what people have to say about it. And theres is stuff said on here that you cannot get on the info sheet.


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