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Topic: The Future For Air Travel!
Username: Africawings
Posted 2005-03-16 00:39:08 and read 3189 times.

The Economist Newspaper ran an interesting article last week that talked about the future of air travel. It claims that things are about to change for the better in the aviation industry.

What surprised me is what was described as positive change in terms of technology and creature comforts for the airlines. Looked like more of the same to me.

What do you think?

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http://www.economist.com/displaystory.cfm?story_id=3713929
CHANGE IS IN THE AIR
Mar 10th 2005
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Topic: RE: The Future For Air Travel!
Username: ACYWG
Posted 2005-03-16 01:02:27 and read 3165 times.

Quoting Africawings (Thread starter):
What surprised me is what was described as positive change in terms of technology and creature comforts for the airlines. Looked like more of the same to me.

Could this be referring to the impending 787? I know there was talk that it will be more comfortable because of the ability to have high cabin humidity due to increased use of composites.

Topic: RE: The Future For Air Travel!
Username: Centrair
Posted 2005-03-16 01:27:59 and read 3144 times.

Interesting article.

Here in Japan ANA introduced ticketing via iMode FeliCa data chips. Docomo and some other cell phones have chips in them which are tied directly to one's bank account.

You can go to the corner store without your wallet and buy a cola. Just swipe your phone over the register and the sale is done. You can also use the phone for your train pass and airline tickets domestically.

You go to the ANA check in and you can either use an e-ticket or you use your phone.

1) Buy your ticket via the cell phone (web)
2) Receive your receipt via cell phone email (registers to your FeliCa chip)
3) Swipe your phone over the reader at the ANA desk and you get a boarding pass. The only paper you get is the boarding pass.

Check it out:
ANA's Ticketless Commercial (Japanese) The Commercial is called "osakini" which means "before others" or "excuse me for going first".
ANA's video on using iMode FeliCa
NTT DoCoMo's FeliCa service

Note: Future of airtravel...ANA's website. The top bar used to have a 744 but now is a 787.

Topic: RE: The Future For Air Travel!
Username: Centrair
Posted 2005-03-16 01:29:34 and read 3142 times.

Interesting article.

Here in Japan ANA introduced ticketing via iMode FeliCa data chips. Docomo and some other cell phones have chips in them which are tied directly to one's bank account.

You can go to the corner store without your wallet and buy a cola. Just swipe your phone over the register and the sale is done. You can also use the phone for your train pass and airline tickets domestically.

You go to the ANA check in and you can either use an e-ticket or you use your phone.

1) Buy your ticket via the cell phone (web)
2) Receive your receipt via cell phone email (registers to your FeliCa chip)
3) Swipe your phone over the reader at the ANA desk and you get a boarding pass. The only paper you get is the boarding pass.

Check it out:
ANA's Ticketless Commercial (Japanese) The Commercial is called "osakini" which means "before others" or "excuse me for going first".
ANA's video on using iMode FeliCa (Japanese)
NTT DoCoMo's FeliCa service (English)

Note: Future of airtravel...ANA's website. The top bar used to have a 744 but now is a 787.

Topic: RE: The Future For Air Travel!
Username: Lehpron
Posted 2005-03-16 01:42:45 and read 3124 times.

Quoting Africawings (Thread starter):
The Future For Air Travel!

I do realize how easily subjective the title of the article can be, I see it not as a future for air travel, more like a future for air travelers. This near term revolution will concentrate on the real customers: pax. It's a market by itself, done mainly through the actions of airports and airlines.

Quoting Africawings (Thread starter):
It claims that things are about to change for the better in the aviation industry.

No offense, I found that to be surprising. Overall, the aviation industry is thesedays is very boring. Look around, all we are doing is tweeking current technology and applying it is different areas with the same result, nothing new at all. To me atleast. I'm looking at it from a business perspective and I see it as very dangerous to depend on "one size fits all".

Quoting Africawings (Thread starter):
It claims that things are about to change for the better in the aviation industry.

IMO, it explained jack about the aviation industry, this article had nothing to do with airplanes. This synopsis by the author was what he/she was told how the future consisted of streamlining the air travel "experience", not the aviation technology per se. The focus in this market is to get people through an airport and onto their airplane with as little inconvinience and as fast as possible. This is a type of streamlining, the kind with no human interaction.

Topic: RE: The Future For Air Travel!
Username: PA110
Posted 2005-03-16 02:36:59 and read 3071 times.

This report goes much further down the road in dividing the public between those who are capable of interacting with a kiosk, website, or using their cell phone to access services, and those who are not.

With the advent of self-service kiosks, I figured it will simply be a generational thing. Most under the age of 50 who have had some exposure to self serve machines (like bank ATMs) would have no problem using the airport kiosks. Left in line would be the older generation who's exposure and/or comfort with automation is limited. In actuality, it's not just grandma and grandpa who chose to wait in line for a customer service agent, it is also all those who for lack of income, education or other resources, don't have the required familiarity or comfort using a self service device. On top of all these folks are those who need a live person to resolve some irregularity or special request.

I'm very comfortable with technology and take advantage of it at every opportunity. However many in this world are not. If the industry does plow ahead even close to the pace this article describes, we will soon see even more of a two-tier airport experience than we do now. The "fast lane" for the tech savvy, and a much slower cumbersome experience for those not comfortable with technology.

Airlines and airports are going to have to be sensitive to this.

edited for clarity

[Edited 2005-03-16 02:52:28]


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