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Topic: Can An Aircraft Turn While Landing?
Username: OD-BWH
Posted 2006-04-14 13:05:57 and read 3248 times.

Hello,
I know (and correct me if i'm wrong) that the outermost airleron on the wing is used as a flap in landing!! If so, can an aircraft make hard turns while flaps are fully deployed? I guess aircraft make their final turn and align with the runway before deploying the flaps. Is it correct?

Thanks anyways
OD-BWH

Topic: RE: Can An Aircraft Turn While Landing?
Username: Fr8Mech
Posted 2006-04-14 13:21:25 and read 3212 times.

Only certain aircraft have ailerons that deflect with the flaps. Those ailerons still act as ailerons. Most aircraft that have both outerboard and inboard ailerons restrict the travel and/or usage of the outboard ailerons at high speed and give full authority at low speed. So to answer your question, yes the aircraft can turn while landing.

Topic: RE: Can An Aircraft Turn While Landing?
Username: RichardPrice
Posted 2006-04-14 13:25:41 and read 3208 times.

Quoting OD-BWH (Thread starter):
Hello,
I know (and correct me if i'm wrong) that the outermost airleron on the wing is used as a flap in landing!! If so, can an aircraft make hard turns while flaps are fully deployed? I guess aircraft make their final turn and align with the runway before deploying the flaps. Is it correct?

Take a look at the Kunazi (sp?) approach to JFK, its a long sweeping curved approach to miss some noise abatement areas at the end of the runway, and involves very little straight flight during the approach.

Topic: RE: Can An Aircraft Turn While Landing?
Username: ANCFlyer
Posted 2006-04-14 13:28:32 and read 3197 times.

Fly the River Visual approach into DCA for Rwy 19 and that'll answer it for you!

http://204.108.4.16/d-tpp/0603/00443RIVER_VIS19.PDF

Topic: RE: Can An Aircraft Turn While Landing?
Username: TheSorcerer
Posted 2006-04-14 13:29:40 and read 3197 times.

Which A/C have ailerons that are used as flaps in landing?
thanks
Dominic

Topic: RE: Can An Aircraft Turn While Landing?
Username: NAV20
Posted 2006-04-14 13:31:33 and read 3188 times.

OD-BWH, all the control surfaces are in use all the time when landing. The aeroplane wouldn't stay on line (or on the correct glidepath) for a moment if they weren't.

Topic: RE: Can An Aircraft Turn While Landing?
Username: HAWK21M
Posted 2006-04-14 20:04:30 and read 2923 times.

What Type are you reffering to.
regds
MEL

Topic: RE: Can An Aircraft Turn While Landing?
Username: Fr8Mech
Posted 2006-04-14 20:18:34 and read 2894 times.

Quoting TheSorcerer (Reply 4):
Which A/C have ailerons that are used as flaps in landing?

They are not used as flaps. Their nuetral position is reset to a drooped condition which acts as a continuation of the flap. The aileron still acts as an aileron and responds to flight deck inputs appropriately.

The only 2 types I know about are the MD11 and A300. Though I'm sure juat about any of the newer airframe types have this feature.

Topic: RE: Can An Aircraft Turn While Landing?
Username: Nudelhirsch
Posted 2006-04-14 20:23:38 and read 2886 times.

Quoting RichardPrice (Reply 2):
Take a look at the Kunazi (sp?) approach to JFK, its a long sweeping curved approach to miss some noise abatement areas at the end of the runway, and involves very little straight flight during the approach.

That would be the Canarsie one, or Parkway Visual for 13 L/R as the official name is.

Link:
http://www.myairplane.com/databases/...oach/pdfs/00610PARKWAY_VIS13LR.PDF

Topic: RE: Can An Aircraft Turn While Landing?
Username: Coronado990
Posted 2006-04-14 21:37:21 and read 2768 times.

The old Kai Tak gave you full flap turns 9 seconds prior to landing every time...


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