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Topic: What Were The First Frequent Flyer Programs?
Username: UAL747
Posted 2006-08-09 01:51:30 and read 5596 times.

Simple Question:

Just wondering who started the first frequent flyer program and what the guidlines were to receive rewards for frequent flyers.

UAL

Topic: RE: What Were The First Frequent Flyer Programs?
Username: AeroWesty
Posted 2006-08-09 02:01:13 and read 5582 times.

Contrary to conventional wisdom that gives the nod to American, it was actually Western, with their Travel Pass system that awarded $50 in travel certificates for every 5 trips. American developed the mileage-based system we know today.

An excellent reference to the early days of FF programs is here:

http://www.insideflyer.com/articles/article.php?key=2926

When I was going back through my old statements a while back, I could only sit and drool at the rewards available back in the early days. I'll dig them out again later and post a few examples.

My best redemption came from OnePass around 1988. For flying 20 segments, I was awarded a free coach ticket to Europe, 7 nights at any Marriott worldwide, and a free rental car for the week. I believe I also earned triple miles while earning those segments, but would have to check. Quite the haul.

Topic: RE: What Were The First Frequent Flyer Programs?
Username: DesertAir
Posted 2006-08-09 02:03:25 and read 5579 times.

The first milage program I participated in was PSA. They often rewarded participants 500 miles as a bonus. I cashed in miles for a trip to Los Cabos.

Topic: RE: What Were The First Frequent Flyer Programs?
Username: AeroWesty
Posted 2006-08-09 02:52:53 and read 5526 times.

A little correction to my post above. The OnePass award to Europe with hotel and car was from a "Fall Bonanza 1987" award for flying 20 segments between Oct-Dec '87, and I earned elite miles while earning the segments. In 1988 triple miles kicked in industry-wide, and I earned that on top of my elite bonus.

OnePass awards valid on Continental and Eastern from the back of my 2/28/88 statement:

Within Mainland U.S. & Canada:

Round-trip upgrade - 10K miles
Round-trip Coach companion ticket - 15K miles MileageSaver, 25K miles standard
Round-trip Coach - 20K miles MileageSaver, 35K miles standard
Round-trip First - 45K miles
Two round-trip Coach - 35K miles MileageSaver, 50K miles standard
Two round-trip First - 75K miles

Between Mainland U.S. & Mexico, the Caribbean or Central America OR between cities in Central America and South America:

Round-trip upgrade - 10K miles
Round-trip Coach companion ticket - 20K miles MileageSaver, 25K miles standard
Round-trip Coach - 25K miles MileageSaver, 35K miles standard
Round-trip First - 45K miles
Two round-trip Coach - 40K miles MileageSaver, 50K miles standard
Two round-trip First - 75K miles

Between Mainland U.S. or Canada and Hawaii, OR between Hawaii and the South Pacific:

Round-trip upgrade - 20K miles
Round-trip Coach companion ticket - 30K miles
Round-trip Coach - 30K miles off-peak, 50K standard
Round-trip Business - 60K miles
Round-trip First - 70K miles
Two round-trip Coach - 45K miles off-peak, 80K miles standard
Two round-trip Business - 90K miles
Two round-trip First - 100K miles

Between Mainland U.S. and Europe or South America:

Round-trip upgrade - 20K miles
Round-trip Coach companion ticket - 30K miles off-peak, 40K miles standard
Round-trip Coach - 35K miles off-peak, 50K standard
Round-trip Business - 65K miles
Round-trip First - 80K miles
Two round-trip Coach - 55K miles off-peak, 80K miles standard
Two round-trip Business - 100K miles
Two round-trip First - 140K miles

Between Mainland U.S. and the South Pacific:

Round-trip upgrade - 30K miles
Round-trip Coach companion ticket - 40K miles off-peak, 60K miles standard
Round-trip Coach - 55K miles off-peak, 70K standard
Round-trip Business - 90K miles
Round-trip First - 110K miles
Two round-trip Coach - 75K miles off-peak, 115K miles standard
Two round-trip Business - 150K miles
Two round-trip First - 170K miles

International Airline Awards:
(Partners - Air France, Alitalia, British Caledonian, Aer Lingus, SAS and Sabena)

Round-trip upgrade - 40K miles
Round-trip Coach companion ticket - 60K miles
Round-trip Coach - 65K miles
Round-trip Business - 85K miles
Round-trip First - 125K miles
Two round-trip Coach - 100K miles
Two round-trip Business - 125K miles
Two round-trip First - 225K miles

Topic: RE: What Were The First Frequent Flyer Programs?
Username: Mhtmdw
Posted 2006-08-09 05:25:16 and read 5451 times.

My dad was one of the first to be signed up as he was an Admirals Club member at the time. He was flying pretty much weekly at the time so we ended up with LOTS of free First Class tickets. Those were the days.

Topic: RE: What Were The First Frequent Flyer Programs?
Username: SP90
Posted 2006-08-19 15:03:51 and read 5280 times.

I was going to start a new thread until I found this.

How are FF miles calculated by the airline? Is it the great circle route distance between point A and B? So another words, if the flight was diverted or makes a few circles because of weather I won't be seeing the extra miles flown right?

[Edited 2006-08-19 15:04:49]

Topic: RE: What Were The First Frequent Flyer Programs?
Username: American 767
Posted 2006-08-19 15:55:26 and read 5236 times.

I do think it was American Airlines that first started with the mileage calculation, the AAdvantage program started back in 1981, within the first year of existance there were already 300000 members! Of course at that time there wasn't aa.com, it was Eaasy Sabre on Compuserve, and you could not see your account online, you had to wait till they mailed it to you on paper. I joined the AAdvantage program in 1989.

Quoting SP90 (Reply 5):
So another words, if the flight was diverted or makes a few circles because of weather I won't be seeing the extra miles flown right?

No. You get your miles based on the distance of the scheduled route, whether or not your flight got diverted. Six years ago, I was flying from BRU to ORD, the flight got diverted to Indianapolis because of the weather in Chicago, I got the same number of miles as if the flight had gone as planned.

Ben Soriano

Topic: RE: What Were The First Frequent Flyer Programs?
Username: Star_world
Posted 2006-08-20 05:53:48 and read 5126 times.

Quoting American 767 (Reply 6):
No. You get your miles based on the distance of the scheduled route, whether or not your flight got diverted. Six years ago, I was flying from BRU to ORD, the flight got diverted to Indianapolis because of the weather in Chicago, I got the same number of miles as if the flight had gone as planned.

And to take this a stage further, if you fly a "direct" flight (all on one flight number) eg: BWI-DFW-LAX then on most airlines you'll only get the miles between BWI-LAX, which for some routes could be dramatically lower. Frequent flyers who are aiming to maximise their miles earned usually try to avoid these direct flights for this reason - if you fly on two separate flight numbers you'll get the full miles for each segment.

Topic: RE: What Were The First Frequent Flyer Programs?
Username: SP90
Posted 2006-09-02 04:20:54 and read 4946 times.

Hey if I wanted to maximized my miles I'll fly something like this. =)

5 segment path: 5709 mi
LGA - MIA 1097 mi
MIA - ORD 1197 mi
ORD - DFW 802 mi
DFW - SEA 1660 mi
SEA - LAX 954 mi

Topic: RE: What Were The First Frequent Flyer Programs?
Username: FLY2LIM
Posted 2006-09-02 06:02:33 and read 4905 times.

Quoting American 767 (Reply 6):
No. You get your miles based on the distance of the scheduled route, whether or not your flight got diverted. Six years ago, I was flying from BRU to ORD, the flight got diverted to Indianapolis because of the weather in Chicago, I got the same number of miles as if the flight had gone as planned.



Quoting Star_world (Reply 7):
And to take this a stage further, if you fly a "direct" flight (all on one flight number) eg: BWI-DFW-LAX then on most airlines you'll only get the miles between BWI-LAX, which for some routes could be dramatically lower. Frequent flyers who are aiming to maximise their miles earned usually try to avoid these direct flights for this reason - if you fly on two separate flight numbers you'll get the full miles for each segment.

On the other hand, if you are scheduled to fly, say, SFO-MIA non stop but you agree to get voluntarily bumped and they send you SFO-ORD-MIA, you get added miles since they count the miles for each segment, even if your original ticket was for a smaller amount of miles.
Furthermore, if they give you a voucher for getting bumped (which has happened to me a lot), you then purchase a ticket for future travel, and get full miles for the future ticket. And if the first ticket was purchased with your airline's credit card, you get even more miles.
And that's how you maximize your miles.

FLY2LIM


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